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FDR's Pearl Harbor Speech

College English
by

Kelsey Beeler

on 28 November 2012

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Transcript of FDR's Pearl Harbor Speech

Franklin Delano Roosevelt's

Pearl Harbor Speech He manipulated.... Rhetorical Devices by using: Pathos Ethos Logos Repetition Syntax Parallelism Point of View Pathos "Our people, Our territory, and
Our interests." Roosevelt used Pathos to give the listener a feeling
of unity and togetherness, which America needed to succeed against Japan. "I regret to tell you that very
many American lives have been
lost." This quote said by Roosevelt causes the listener
to be angry and... seek revenge. Ethos Ethically justified to
declare war on... The use of Ethos the listener agree with Roosevelt's tactic of Japan Attacks the United States! "On December 7th, 1941... the U.S. was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of Japan." This attack caused lots of debate on whether to declare war on Japan in return. In response Franklin Delano Roosevelt wrote a speech explaining how he felt about how the United States should react. Logos Allows the listener to see the logic behind the attack "Yesterday, December 7th, 1941 -- a date which will live in infamy -- the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan." Roosevelt believes the logical thing to do would be to fight back against Japan. By using Logos that causes his listeners to agree with his plan. Repetition Roosevelt uses repetition to reiterate his points "... the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked..." "The American people in their righteous might will win through to absolute victory." "Last night, Japanese forces attacked Hong Kong. Last night, Japanese forces attacked Guam. Last night, Japanese forces attacked the Philippine Islands..." The word "deliberately" allows the listener to understand that the attack
was for a reason and was planned ahead of time. It also
demonstrates the offense towards the Japanese
because of this attack. The word "righteous might" in this quote helps to
give reason to American's actions. It also gives people the idea
that the country will be protected by God no matter
what they do. Repeating those phrases emphasizes to the listener
the amount of burden Japan has brought upon not
only the U.S. but to numerous other people. It also
makes the listener realize that Japan planned all these
attacks to pursue in one night. This can cause a
listener to be angry and feel betrayed. Point of View Roosevelt uses the words
"we" and "our" throughout the speech. These
words help to bring everyone listening to the speech
together as one big family. These words allow Roosevelt
to bring himself to an equal level with
his audience. Syntax The point in the speech where Roosevelt lists off the
places that were attacked by Japan in the last 48 hours allows the listener to learn of all the places Japan has attacked in such a short time frame all by surprise. This also allows Roosevelt to prove the point that the attacks were all planned... The anger that is developed by the audience because of all
the attacks would help persuade them to agree to go to
war with Japan. Parallelism Roosevelt started by saying what happened
and then told Congress that because
of the peace they had with Japan
they never thought anything like the attack
could happen. This would cause the audience to feel a sense
of betrayal. This helps Roosevelt reach his goal because the audience would want to seek revenge against their enemy Japan. "I regret, I believe, I interpret, I assert, I ask," are all used by Roosevelt throughout the speech. Using these allows the listener to take control and put the power in their own hands. 1st Person Plural 1st Person Singular Throughout the speech FDR uses "I" and "me."
Using these words shows the listener that
he is helping the cause and taking matters into
his own hands. Pinpointing the Enemy Pinpointing the Enemy Roosevelt clearly states that the enemy is the... Using this method of propaganda lets the
listener know that Japan is the one to blame
for all the hardships that have been brought
upon the U.S. The main intent of Pinpointing the Enemy is to persuade
the listener to follow FDR and agree to declare war on Japan. Franklin Delano Roosevelt's
Pearl Harbor Speech ended up
being successful. His goal was to
persuade the citizens of the U.S. to
declare war on Japan and he did just that. The use of Rhetorical Devices is what helped him get there by persuading his listeners. His
speech led to the first two atomic bombs
on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Works Cited
“Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Pearl Harbor Address to the Nation.” American Rhetoric. Ed. Michael E. Eidenmuller. 2001-2007. 6 Nov 2012 http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/fdrpearlharbor.htm

Times, N. Y., and N. Y. T. Company. The New York Times page one, one hundred years of headlines as presented in the New York Times. Galahad Books, 2000. Print.

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YouTube Works Cited
“Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Pearl Harbor Address to the Nation.” American Rhetoric. Ed. Michael E. Eidenmuller. 2001-2007. 6 Nov 2012 http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/fdrpearlharbor.htm

Times, N. Y., and N. Y. T. Company. The New York Times page one, one hundred years of headlines as presented in the New York Times. Galahad Books, 2000. Print.

Google Images

YouTube
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