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Brewer and Treyens (1981)

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by

Jean Maneepong

on 26 December 2013

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Transcript of Brewer and Treyens (1981)

Brewer and Treyens (1981)
Experiment on memory of objects in a room

Aim
To investigate whether people’s memory for objects in a room (an office) is influenced by existing schemas about what to expect in an office
Participants
30 university students
Theory
Schema theory
Results
Most of the participants recalled the schematic objects (e.g. desk, typewriter)

Many participants also recalled the skull (unexpected objects)

Some participants reported things that were not in the room but would be expected to be in the room (e.g. telephone, books)


Procedure
The participants arrived individually to the laboratory and waited in an office that was contained with office objects (e.g. desk, typewriter,coffee-pot, calendar.) But here were also other objects in the office (e.g. skull,piece of bark, a pair of pliers)

The participants were let out after some amount of time and they were supposed to write down everything that they could remembered from the room
Evaluation
Strengths:
It confirms schema theory (and reconstructive memory)
Debriefed
Limitations:
Laboratory experiment
Deception
Sample bias
Not generalize
Full transcript