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Copy of Question tags

grammar
by

Lisa Paavilainen

on 26 November 2014

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Transcript of Copy of Question tags

English speaking people get fidgety
in silence.
To avoid uncomfortable silence
they often add a question to the
end of their statement


so that their
listener will have to answer.
This is very typical in spoken English.
It goes like this:



The weather is nice today, isn't it?
Or like this:





You don't like spaghetti, do you?
Or maybe like this:



Your dad bought a new car, didn't he?
Let's take a
closer look


at how to make
question tags.
Our example sentences were:

1. The weather
is
nice today,
is
n't
it?
2. You
do
n't
like spaghetti,
do
you?
3. Your dad bought a new car,
did
n't
he?
So what

can we conclude

from these


examples?
First of all,
if the statement is positive, the question tag is negative:




The weather
is
nice today,
is
n't
it?
Your dad bought a new car,
did
n't
he?
And the other way around:
if the statement is negative , the question tag is positive :



You
do
n't
like spaghetti,
do
you?
the question tag repeats the
auxiliary
(apuverbi) of the statement. These are eg.
be, have, do, can, will.

The weather

is
nice today,

is
n't
it?
You
do
n't
like spaghetti,
do
you?
However,
if the statement does
not

contain an auxiliary,
the question tag is made with the auxiliary
do
.

Your dad bought a new car,
did
n't
he?
And finally,

the question tag is in the same
tense
(aikamuoto)
as the statement.

The weather

is
nice today,

is
n't
it?
Your dad
bought
a new car,
did
n't
he?
Now comes the fun part:



intonation.
If the tag is a
true
question to which you do
not
know the answer, the question tag
rises
.

Your dad bought a new car,
did
n't
he?
But if the tag is only a reinforcement of the
statement
,
the question tag goes
down
.

The weather
is
nice today,
is
n't
it?
Your dad bought a new car,
did
n't
he?
Let's


practice!

Which of the next tags is correct?

The cat climbed up the tree,

a)
doesn't it?
b)
wouldn't it?
c)
didn't it?
d)
did it?
The train will be late,

a)
won't it?
b)
will it?
c)
doesn't it?
d)
isn't it?
Sarah can't come,

a)
will she?
b)
can she?
c)
does she?
d)
won't she?
You didn't eat the last cookie,

a)
ate you?
b)
didn't you?
c)
wouldn't you?
d)
did you?
Secondly,
QUESTION TAGS
???????
That man is your brother,

a)
doesn't he?
b)
is he?
c)
does he?
d)
isn't he?
And now it's your turn.
Add a question tag
to the next statements.

You haven't seen


my dog,

Tim can sing well,
That tree





looks pretty interesting,
You had never been




to Paris before,
A bird

just flew past,
There is one exception, though.
So, you want to play with me, do you?
Full transcript