Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

MOOCs

No description
by

Chiara Varisco

on 19 June 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of MOOCs

MOOCs
Models
MOOCs?
These initiatives launched in 2012 with the support of prestigious universities offering
online
courses taught by national and international professors
accessible
(open) mostly for
free
to anyone.
The number of participants in each course is on average equal to several thousands (sometimes 100,000 +) from which the term
massive
.
Brand + Teacher Based:
MOOCs comparison
“Education, and higher education in particular, should be as
widely available as possible
. It’s essential to human flourishing, and it’s immoral to confine access to something so valuable to a tiny group of people.”
Terry Fisher, Hardvard Law School
are based on the attractiveness of the idea of following a course of a prestigious university, taught by a teacher great renown.
Business oriented:
content, activities and services are born from close relationships with businesses.
Guru centred:
the focus is placed on knowledge sharing by teachers and prestigious personalities from the world of culture and business
Content based:
educational organization founded with the goal of providing "a high level of education to anyone, anywhere".
for-profit start-up founded by two Stanford professors, Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng in 2011
partership with prestigious universities.
multidisciplinary approach
certification fee
1,850,000 students
69 member universities (La Sapienza is the only Italian University)
joint venture between MIT e Hardvard
subsidized by Bill e Melinda Gates Foundation
no profit
certification fee
360.000 students
19 Universities
founded by 3 Stanford professors Sebastian Thrun, David Stavens, e Mike Sokolsky
explicitly for profit
possibility that the college tuition is paid by companies in exchange of students' ideas and design
certification fee
753.000 students
5 Universities
The MOOCs birth
The key moment for MOOCs birth is to be placed at Stanford in
September 2011
when a free online course in
Artificial Intelligence
by Peter Norving and Sebastian Thrun attracts more than 160,000 students from all over the world (23,000 have completed the course). This has promoted the launch of Coursera in 2012.
The humus: il WebC
After the
2.0 Web
whose peculiarity was the user's ability to shape the Web (e.g. YouTube), it did not appear the much announced
3.0 Web
but

the
WebC
that is based on services/initiatives born in the philosophy of
crowdsourcing
, where the
huge participation
of users (crowd) is the key element and the
connectivist approach
is the primary reference methods.
CrowdSoucing>CrowdLearning>MOOCs
"In general we consider
crowd things

the new web based on the involvement of
huge quantity
of people all over the world
sharing
a common objective."
Collective Intelligence
Principles
AGGREGATION:
The
massive amount of contents
has to be

aggregated
on an open platform accessible to everyone who is interested in them. This is in contrast to traditional courses, where the content is prepared step by step and there is not the possibility to access them in their entirety.
REMIXING:
to
associate
materials created within the course with each other and with materials elsewhere.
RE-PURPOSING
FEED FORWARD
of aggregated and remixed materials to
suit the goals of each participant
.
sharing
of re-purposed ideas and content with other participants and the rest of the world.
Connectivism: Learning as Network- Creation
The pedagogy behind the MOOCs (by George Siemens, 2005)

1.Learning is a process that creates and develops a
network of connections
.

2. Nurturing and maintaining
connections
is needed to facilitate
continual learning.

3.
Ability to see
connections
between fields, ideas, and concepts.

4.
Currency
, accurate and up-to-date knowledge is the intent of all
connectivist learning
activities.

5.
Decision making
is itself a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the incoming of new informations re-organizes learner's knowledge.
Visualizing knowledge domains as a neural network
Target audience:
International student on course
- cost savings on volume courses
International student not on course
-expanding student experience
Lifelong learners
- late and lifelong adult learners
Professionals
-related to professions and work
Government
- launch of new educational initiatives
Critical aspect:
are MOOCs a disruptive innovation?
The connectivism in the E-Learning
Christensen's theory (2003)
"What is needed is not a new
stand-alone theory
for the digital age, but a model that
integrates the different theories
to guide the design of online learning materials"

Mohamed Ally, Athabasca University, Canada
The problem of Big Data: how can we re-organize our knowledge?
Implications for Higher Education
K. Borner, C. Chen, K. Boyack, Indiana University2003
Rhizomatic Learning
"A rhizome, sometimes called a creeping rootstalk, is a stem of a plant that sends out roots and shoots as it spreads. It is an image to describe the way that ideas are
multiple, interconnected and self-replicating
. A rhizome has no beginning or end… like the learning process".
Globalisation
and the increased momentum for
internationalisation
in higher education.

Worldwide growth
and increasing demand for access to higher education, with the projection that there will be 120 million students worldwide by 2020.
Changing of
learner demographics, experience and demands
and the dramatically increasing numbers of lifelong adult learners.
The
need for changes
in cost, affordability and economic models for higher education.
Open your mind and share your knowledge.
Astrophysics
Quantum physics
Applied physics
Physical Chemestry
Organic Chemestry
Biology
Infectious
Diseases
Virology
Therapeutic
Research
Health Care
Mental Health
Social Science
Computer Science
Brain Research
Central nervous
system
Ecology
Materials
Funding
Full transcript