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Jackie Grant

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Stage 6
Global Challenges
Population Geography the changing nature, rate and distribution of the world’s population Enhancing literacy spatial patterns of fertility and mortality Worksheets and videos Outcomes Students learn to types, volumes and directions of population movements such as rural-urban migration, labour migration and refugee migration Worksheets and ICT Outcomes Students Learn to Enhancing Literacy Lessons Structure Enhancing Literacy Lessons Overview
This dot point will go over 4 lessons. The order of the work goes as follows:
1. We will quickly discuss the last lesson on the changing nature, rate and distribution of the world’s population.
2.I will present the PowerPoint to the class answering any questions as they come up.
4.We watch the videos on family planing and birth rates. Students list five reasons why family planing is important in Uganda and five challenges the UNFPA faces in implementing contraceptives and family planing.
4 The students will complete the activity on the last slide.
5 Students will complete the activity on the wiki page
6 students will use the information from the last lessons and their own research to complete the following question.
What are the factors that effect spacial patterns of fertility and mortality? Use examples of specific countries to support your argument. You may include maps and diagrams
Extension Task: Students who finish before the rest of the class are to go to UNFPA State of the Worlds Population p.43 and describe three factors that influence fertility P4 analyses changing demographic patterns and processes
P7 formulates a plan for active geographical inquiry P8selects, organises and analyses relevant geographical information from avariety of sources P9uses maps, graphs and statistics, photographs and fieldwork to conductgeographical inquiries
P10 applies mathematical ideas and techniques to analyse geographical data P12 communicates geographical information, ideas and issues using writtenand/or oral, cartographic and graphic forms. investigate and communicate geographically
use geographical skills and tools UNFPA By choice not by chance: Uganda family planing http://www.unfpa.org/swp Census data video China internal migration videos and worksheet Syrian Refugees http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php China's Development Project Video P4 analyses changing demographic patterns and processes
P5 examines the geographical nature of global challenges confronting humanity
P7formulates a plan for active geographical inquiry P8selects, organises and analyses relevant geographical information from avariety of sources
P9uses maps, graphs and statistics, photographs and fieldwork to conductgeographical inquiries
P12 communicates geographical information, ideas and issues using writtenand/or oral, cartographic and graphic forms. investigate and communicate geographically
use geographical skills and tools Chernobyl Ukraine: The site of the 1986 Nuclear Disaster which resulted in the evacuation and permanent desertion of the entire town Forced migration is the displacement of people due to:
-conflict (refugees and internally displaced people)
- natural disasters, chemical or nuclear disasters, famine or development projects. Forced Migration Syrian refugees queue for relief items at Jordan's Za'atri camp. Photo: UNHCR/S. Malkawi Forced Migration: The Facts -Over 70 million people are forced migrants (more than one in every 100 of the world’s citizens) displaced by conflict, political upheaval, violence and disasters but also by climate change and development.

-The cost of forced migration globally is $8billion a year.

- Forced migration results in destroyed livelihoods, increased vulnerability especially of women and children, lost homelands and histories, fractured households and disempowered communities, and the destruction of the common bonds and shared values of humanity. Some sites to help you start
https://www.ifrc.org/PageFiles/99703/1216800-WDR%202012-EN-LR.pdf
http://books.google.com.au/books?id=F7CcCuPDZ5cC&q=environment#v=snippet&q=environment&f=false
http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Safety-and-Security/Safety-of-Plants/Chernobyl-Accident/#.UYYXGXCUAy4
http://www1.american.edu/ted/ICE/china-dam-impact.html
http://www.forcedmigration.org/research-resources/expert-guides/palestinian-refugees-in-the-west-bank-and-the-gaza/fmo043.pdf In groups of 3-4 choose a case study that has been briefly covered in this powerpoint compile a fact file for the forced migration of people.
Include:
The location of the forced movement.
A timeline of events/ continuing impacts of forced migration
The causes for the forced migration
Number of displaced people
government initiatives to rectify displacement
On going costs of displacement for both the displaced people and the countries or areas they have moved to.
You have the rest of this lesson and all of next lesson to finish the fact file. Once you have finished it upload it to the class wiki. Group Task Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant after explosion The city Chernobyl in the Ukraine is the site of the largest nuclear disaster to date.
In 1986 an accident caused by a faulty reactor in the Chernobyl nuclear plant resulted in an explosion and fire that caused at least 5% of the radioactive reactor core into the atmosphere and downwind.
The entire town was evacuated and the relocation of people is still on going. The main resettlement area is Belarus. Case Study: Chernobyl the current construction of China’s Three Gorges Dam China’s Three Gorges Dam
The Three Gorges Dam is the world’s largest hydroelectric project, it will be more than 600km long.
China’s Three Gorges Dam Project will displace upwards of 1.2 million people and will flood 13 cities, 140 towns, 1,350 villages.
The project will cost $25billion and is funded completely by the Chinese government as they did not want to be bound by regulations from funders. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60s1CVW1XUA Case Studies: China Palestinian refugees 1948 The influx of Jewish people to Palestine resulted in claims to land and civil war. Almost all Arabs residing in what is now Israel have been displaced at least once, resulting in the forced internal migration and movement to neighbouring countries such as Jordan. In 1882 24,00 Jews lived in Palestine. By 18919 the umber was over 70,000. During British mandate Jewish immigrants reached 4.3 million with 90% of immigrants being from Europe. In 1988 the Jewish population was 6.5 million. Those migrating from the middle east were largely poor and illiterate
This rapid influx of immigrants placed a large strain on the state and both socially and economically. The creation of Israel in 1947 resulted in the forced outflow of Arabs. It is so closely linked with other nations coercion of people that it comes under forced migration. Case Studies: Palestine-Israel Rooftop travel on India’s trains is illegal but common Topic 3: Population Geography The changing nature, rate and distribution of the world’s population Global Patterns of Population Increase -Growth rates are highest in countries that are least able to cope with a growing population.

-The developing world have 80% of the worlds population and are responsible for 98%of the world’s population increase.

-The greatest increase is in Africa where population is expected to double between 2007 and 2050.

-Furthermore 42% of Africa’s population is under 15.

-In the developed world the rate of population growth has slowed significantly. In Europe for example the fertility rate is 1.5 which is too low to replenish the population A heavily laden vessel in the Sundarbans 1. What is the world’s approximate population?

2.What is population growth?

3. Is the population in every country growing?

4What are some concerns about population? Before we start lets answer some questions Overcrowding is a serious issue in Chinese pools -In the twentieth century the population has grown at an exponential rate.

-In 1999 the worlds population reached 6billion people and by 2007 it had reached 6.6billion people. This is a significant growth seeing as in 1950 the population was 2.5billion people.

-Every year the population grows by more than 77 million people. This increase is inevitable seeing as 28% of the world’s population is under the age of 15.

-Population growth is expected to decrease and stabilise in the late 21st century Population Growth The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne Both of these are a result of advances in medical science and public health, nutritional improvements and greater access to education -There are several reasons for the rapid growth of population, which include
-significantly lowered child mortality rates
Since the early 1950s the child mortality rate has more than halved from 198 deaths /1000 live births in 1960 to 52 deaths/ 1000 live births in 2007.
-higher life expectancy Causes of the Rapid Growth Introduction PowerPoint Worksheet 1 Worksheet 2 7 Billion and Counting video
http://www.npr.org/series/141810687/7-billion-people-one-planet Worksheets and ICT Lessons Structure This dotpoint will go across two lessons. The structure is as follows.
1. Introduce the topic and let the students know what the topic will encompass. Students complete glossary worksheet
2. As a class we go through the introduction PowerPoint. Students will answer the questions in their books then go through the questions as a class.
3. As a class we will watch the video 7 billion and counting and discuss the impacts of a growing population. As a class we will create a mindmap
4. As a class we will watch the Census video and discuss data collection and it's importance and possible problems.
5. Students complete worksheet 1. We go through it as a class when the students have finished .
6. Students complete worksheet 2 and create the PowerPoint. These will be uploaded to the class Wiki and the issues will be covered in class.
Extension Task: Students who finish work before the rest of the class will go to the UNFPA State of the worlds population p.29 and explain the role of the elderly in China, Finland and Ethiopia P4analyses changing demographic patterns and processes P5examines the geographical nature of global challenges confronting humanity
P7formulates a plan for active geographical inquiry
P8selects, organises and analyses relevant geographical information from avariety of sources
P9uses maps, graphs and statistics, photographs and fieldwork to conductgeographical inquiries
P10 applies mathematical ideas and techniques to analyse geographical data
P12 communicates geographical information, ideas and issues using writtenand/or oral, cartographic and graphic forms.Content Outcomes Students Learn To investigate and communicate geographically
use geographical skills and tools Glossary Terms Worksheet Forced Migration PowerPoint Migration Video Rural- Urban Migration Worksheet Changing Fertility Rates Factors Affecting Fertility Rates Spacial Patterns of Fertility and Mortality Power Point Class Wiki Worksheet Lessons Structure This dotpoint will be covered over 3 lessons. The structure is as follows:
Lesson 1.
1. Students are asked to write what they think migration is and list the types that they can think of. Once the students have written their definition we will compile a class definition.
2. As a class we watch the video on migration. Students are asked to write how this video changed or affirmed their beliefs and understanding of migration. Their answer should be a least a paragraph, and we will go through some responses as a class.
4.As a class we will read through types of internal migration in Global Explorations 1 on page 244 and internal migration on page 250. Students are asked to list push and pull factors and explain the counter-ubanisation movement.
5. Students read through rural-urban migration sheet and create a mindmap .
6. As a class we watch the videos on China's internal migration movements and students complete the fill in the blanks sheet that accompanies the video.
Lesson 2.
7. As a class we go through the forced migration PowerPoint. Students organise themselves into groups and decide on a case study.
8. Students present case study to the class
9. Teacher presents case study on Syria using the video and website.
Lesson 3.
10. Students are asked what they think labour migration is. As a class we discuss why labour migration is popular. Looking at the ease of movement due to the breaking down of boarders and the ability to send money home.
11. The class is informed that they are going to be creating a fact file on labour migration in the EU. Before they start their research they are asked why the EU has high levels of labour migration. The economic crisis in the eurozone will be looked at. If students do not know what is currently happening in the EU there are to research Greece, Spain, Cyprus and France's financial problems before starting the fact file so that they can further understand what is happening.
12. Students are told to go to the website http://www.labourmigration.eu/research/report/15-part-1-migration-and-the-labour-markets-in-the-european-union-2000-2009 and download Home Research
Part 1: Migration and the Labour Markets in the EU (2000-2009) and Migration and the Economic Crisis in the European Union: Implications for Policy. They are to choose one country fro mthe case studies to focus on.
There are to look at the causes and impacts of labour migration in the EU. Once they have completed their fact file they are to upload it to the class wiki issues arising from the changing size and distribution of population including environmental, economic and social impacts. Worksheets and ICT the changing nature, rate and distribution
of the world’s population spatial patterns of fertility and mortality types, volumes and directions of population movements such as rural-urban migration, labour migration and refugee migration issues arising from the changing size and distribution of population including environmental, economic and social impacts. Revision and consolidation lesson Worksheets and ICT Revision Lesson Lessons Structure The revision and consolidation of this topic will
go over two lessons. The structure is as follows
Lesson 1
1.We watch the National Geographic 7 billion video as a confirmation of what we have covered in this topic.
2.Lesson one is an individual research task. Students may choose from the following questions
1.Describe the changing nature, rate and distribution of the world’s population
2. Describe the causes and impacts of spacial patterns of fertility and mortality.
3.Choose one type of migration and describe it's causes and the impacts it has on those migrating and the areas they are migrating too
4.Choose one issue arising from the changing size and distribution of population. Explain how it has occurred, how size and distribution exaggerated the problem and possible solutions to the problem.
For each question use a case study to support your argument (I suggest you use one we looked at in class) and include graphs and diagrams.
They have the entire lesson to conduct research and answer their chosen question. The extended responses will be uploaded to the class Wiki.
Lesson 2.
1. Students will compete in geography stations worksheet. This is a good chance for them to test what they know
2. Students will play Geographical Pursuit Population and Climate Change Framework of UNFPA’s Agenda http://www.unfpa.org/pds/climate/docs/climate_change_unfpa.pdf Urban Challenges in South-East Asia
http://www.unescap.org/apuf-5/documents/updates/Southeast-Asia-Second-Draft.pdf A short history of farming in Latin America
http://www.grain.org/article/entries/413-a-short-history-of-farming-in-latin-america WWF Environmental Impacts of Farming
http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/footprint/agriculture/impacts/ Australian Bureau of Statistics: Environmental impacts of agriculture
http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Previousproducts/1301.0Feature%20Article162003?opendocument&tabname=Summary&prodno=1301.0&issue=2003&num=&view= Lessons Structure Before We Start Time Allocated For this unit: 18 hrsLesson Length: 77 minutes Where does Population Geography sit in the Preliminary Curriculum? Population geography is the mandatory topic for the unit Global Challenges. Global Challenges is the second unit in the Preliminary Syllabus and occupies 45% of the preliminary course. It follows Biophysical Interactions. Therefore when the issue of environmental impact of population growth is taught the students should have a sound understanding of the water cycle and the role of water in geomorphological processes, and parent material, slope processes, weathering, mass movements, erosion, transport and deposition, and the fluvial, aeolian and/or coastal geomorphological processes. Though they should have an understanding of these concepts it should not be assumed that the students remember it. As such prior learning must be assessed. These lessons aim to enhance literacy in the following ways:
Visual Literacy: Through the use of images and videos.
Computer Literacy and New Media Literacies: By making the students create a PowerPoint and use websites for research
Cultural literacy: By presenting case studies and examples from a verity of places around the world. Differentiation By going through the answers as a class it gives students who had limited understanding to develop answers and ask questions.
By providing different types of work and information presented in different mediums it allows for different types of learners. There is an extension task for higher level students. Enhancing Literacy This lesson aims to enhance literacy in the following ways:
Visual literacy: Through the presentation of videos
Mathematical or Numeracy Literacy: Through the reading and understanding of figures and completing tasks such as constructing graphs
Computer literacy and Technology Literacy: Through the use of computers and internet for research Differentiation Differentiation is achieved through questions that build on each other and build in difficultly allowing lower order students to answer some questions and attempt others and higher order student to answer all questions. Comprehension questions allow lower order students to answer questions and higher order to go into further depth. There is extension tasks for students who are at a higher level than other students These lesson aims to enhance literacy
in the following ways:
Visual literacy: Through the presentation of videos
Cultural literacy: Through the study of cultures around the world and the impact of population growth and migration on those cultures
Computer literacy: through the use of websites and computer based activities Differentiation This lesson has been differentiated to meet different learners needs and levels in several ways. The choice of case studies allows for different learners to research different areas of interest. The questions build in difficulty so that students can attempt all questions but higher order students can go into more depth. The coast of Mumbai, India’s largest city The large number of people in concentrated areas has significantly contributed to environmental degradation.
-High numbers of people in small areas places high levels of strain on the biophysical environment.
-High levels of water, noise and atmospheric pollution are common.
-The disposal of waste in these areas is another key contributor to the environmental degradation of the world Urbanisation As population increases so does the need for food as a result there has been an explosion of cultivation and grazing of the land.
-Increases in farm land increases levels of erosion and deforestation. It has also increased seasonal flooding and droughts, the silting of rivers and coastal areas and the loss of countless species of plants and animals.
-Due to attempts to make farming more efficient erosion has been further execrated and runoff is also high.
-Agricultural fertilisers have their own consequences which include salinity, algal blooms and chemical residues. Agriculture The rapid growth in population impacts the environment in several different ways. Agriculture, urbanisation and industrialisation all place strain on the environment. Flooding in New Orleans Environmental Issues Arising from Rising Population Coal factories have a huge impact on natural resources and pollute air and waterways Countries going through the process of industrialisation tend to adapt inexpensive and inefficient practices as such this process has significant impacts on the environment.
Although this is the case developing countries tend to be less harmful to the environment than developed nations. It tends to be more affluent countries that use more energy than poorer nations.
Industry itself however has huge impacts on the environment. The impacts of industrial waste and the limited safe disposal of this waste are major issues that have resulted due to the growth in population. Industrialisation Environmental Impacts PowerPoint UNFPA State of the World's Population http://www.unfpa.org/webdav/site/global/shared/documents/publications/2011/EN-SWOP2011-FINAL.pdf UNFPA State of the World's Population 2011
http://www.unfpa.org/webdav/site/global/shared/documents/publications/2011/EN-SWOP2011-FINAL.pdf Spacial Patterns of Fertility and Mortality ‘The number of children a woman is expected to have in her reproductive years, dropped by more than half, from about 6.0 to 2.5, partly because of countries’ economic growth and development but also because of a complex mix of social and cultural forces and greater access by women to education, income-earning opportunities and sexual and reproductive health services, including modern methods
of contraception. In some regions, the total fertility rate
declined drastically between 1950 and today. In Central America, for example, the totalfertility rate was about 6.7 children, while 61 years later it dropped to 2.6, a half percent- age point above the population “replacement level” of 2.1 children, one of them a girl. In East Asia the total fertility rate in 1950 was about 6 children per woman and today is 1.6, well below replacement level. In some parts of Africa, however, there has been only a modest drop in total fertility, which today remains at more than 5 children per woman.But despite global fertility declines, about 80 million people are added to the world each year, a number roughly equivalent to the population of Germany or Ethiopia.’
-UNFPA State of the Worlds Population 2011 Changing Fertility Rates Birth Rates
Birth rates change considerably around the world.
There is several reasons for this which include:
-religious reasons (for example many religions are against the use of contraceptions
-lack of sex education or education in general
-government policy (such as China’s previous one child policy)
-cultural reasons
-In developed countries birth rates tend to be lower this may be because of widely available
and affordable contraceptives, people tend to focus more so on career than family and it is too expensive to have large families.
Please note there are exceptions to these such as the Dugger family in North America which has 19 biological children. Why is there different fertility and mortality rates? Jakarta, Indonesia faces huge sanitation, water and waste problems Factors affecting mortality rates include:
-nutritional standards
-personal hygiene and effluent standards
-access to safe drinking water and instances of infectious disease
-access to medical and public health technology. Including immunisations, antibiotics and insecticides Factors Affecting Mortality Rates Shigechiyo Izumi was the oldest recorded man. Born June 29, 1865, and died February 21, 1986 he lived to be 120 years and 237 days old. Mortality Rates
Similarly mortality rates change considerably around the world.
There are several reasons for this which include:
-Infant mortality rates. Countries such as Australia have low infant mortality rates this is due to education and knowledge of risk factors during pregnancy and avalible infrastructure i.e hospitals and specialists. On the other hand countries such as the Congo and Chad have high infant mortality rates as much of the country is in poverty and lacks infrastructure to care for the mother and child.
-Deaths at the workplace. Countries that do not have safe work practices or followup care (such as workers compensation) have higher mortality rates.
-Life Expectancy. the life expectancy of people changes drastically between countries. In countries such as Australia a high life expectancy means that Australia’s population demographic is changing to an ageing population.
-Health Services. Some countries and regions lack any health services meaning that people are not diagnosed or treated for preventable but deadly diseases. Fertility: The average number of childern a women will have during her productive years.

Death Rates: The total number of deaths per 1000 people in a population per year.

Birth Rates: The total number of live births in a year for every 1000 people in a population per year. Key Terms 1. Which countries have the highest and the lowest birth rate per year?
2.Which countries have the highest and lowest death rate per year?
3.Which countries have the highest and the lowest infant mortality rates per year?
4. Which countries have the highest and lowest life expectancy?
4. Using the power point information and the information provided on the interactive maps discuss why the rates in questions 1-4 change between each country. For further information on the countries go to https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/rankorderguide.html
Your answer should be at least a page. Using the website bellow answer the questions provided
http://www.ined.fr/jeux2.php?_movie=/CartePopulation/cartePopulation.php?html=true&titre=Interactive%20maps%20of%20the%20world%20population&lg=en Activity Time A child worker in a textile factory in Dhaka -Levels of economic and social wellbeing. Fertility rates generally decline in developed ares.
-The importance of the child as part of the families labour force. In developing countries large families are seen as beneficial as children can collect water and wood and work on farms.
-Levels of urbanisation. Areas that are more urbanised tend to have lower fertility rates.
-Education and employment opportunities for women. Fertility rates tend to be higher in areas where women do not have access to education or paid work.
-Average age of marriage. As the average age of marriage increases fertility rates decrease. Factors Affecting Fertility Rates Social Impacts Extended Response National Geographic 7 Billion video Environmental Impact Websites Economic Impacts worksheet This dotpoint will go over 3 lessons. The structure is as follows:
Lesson 1.
1.As a class we will go through the PowerPoint on environmental impacts.
2. Students are to look at the websites provided and discuss the differences in the NGO and government's approaches in environmental impact and the government's justification.
Lesson 2.
3. Students are to brainstorm possible social impacts and as a class create a mindmap of the social impacts they came up with.
4. As a class we read through the extended response. In pairs students are to rewrite the extended response they may ad their own research to further develop their response.
Lesson 3.
5. As a class we read through the worksheet.
6. Students are to complete the task.
Extension task: Students are to go to p.78 of UNFPA State of the World's Population 2011and explain the perspectives on urbanisation. Outcomes P4analyses changing demographic patterns and processes
P5examines the geographical nature of global challenges confronting humanity
P7formulates a plan for active geographical inquiry
P8selects, organises and analyses relevant geographical information from avariety of sources
P9uses maps, graphs and statistics, photographs and fieldwork to conductgeographical inquiries
P10 applies mathematical ideas and techniques to analyse geographical data
P12 communicates geographical information, ideas and issues using writtenand/or oral, cartographic and graphic forms. Students learn to investigate and communicate geographically
use geographical skills and tools
identify geographical methods applicable to, and useful in, the workplace
Enhancing Literacy These lessons aim to enhance literacy in the following ways:
•Media Literacy: Through the students creation of a news report and evaluation of government and no government media releases
Computer Literacy: Through research on the internet and use of computer programs Differentiation This lesson has been differentiated in several ways in order to meet the different needs of the students. Students are provided with different options to present their research.Students may work in pares so that they can help and teach each other. Lastly there is an extension task for students who finish with extra time Outcomes P1differentiates between spatial and ecological dimensions in the study of geographyP4analyses changing demographic patterns and processes
P5examines the geographical nature of global challenges confronting humanity
P6identifies the vocational relevance of a geographical perspective
P7formulates a plan for active geographical inquiry
P8selects, organises and analyses relevant geographical information from avariety of sources
P9uses maps, graphs and statistics, photographs and fieldwork to conductgeographical inquiries
P10 applies mathematical ideas and techniques to analyse geographical data
P12 communicates geographical information, ideas and issues using writtenand/or oral, cartographic and graphic forms. Students learn to investigate and communicate geographically
use geographical skills and tools such
identify geographical methods applicable to, and useful in, the workplace Enhancing literacy These lessons aim to enhance literacy in the following ways:
Mathematical literacy: through the reading and interpreting of graphs and maps
Visual literacy: through the watching of videos and interpreting of photographs
Cultural literacy: through the study of different regions around the world Differentiation The verity of tasks available to consolidate learning allow for different types and levels of learners. Geographical Pursuit board and cards
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