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Transitivity Analysis - Reading Scheme

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by

Matthew Barton

on 12 March 2013

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Transcript of Transitivity Analysis - Reading Scheme

By Paige, Nicola and Matthew Transitivity Analysis What is a 'Transitiviwhatsit'? So is there a Conclusion? Transitivity Analysis Theory(Systematic functional Grammar) Analysis by Paige Walker Ok, now a real Transitivity Analysis, right here, just for you. I'll tell you. So what did
that all mean? On of the biggest points you notice in the text is it's use of a simplistic lexis, and sticking to mainly Material processes such as: In the summery we can collate the data and try to imagine the writer's intentions when using certain processes. Of course. Participants
Processes
Circumstances Transitivity analysis Participants, whose doing what or rather which process is attached to which participant allowing us to see how the participant sees the world around them.
Processes, be they material (physical), Mental (perception), Behavioural, verbal, relational, or existential.
Circumstances, providing more detail (adverbial) Take the text (any text), clause by clause.
Locate all processes and categorise them (verbs)
Identify which processes go with which
participant (nouns) and how many
participants there are.
Circumstances – using the adverbs to find
out what else the text is saying. In Application: The Text: Here is Peter. Here is Jane. They like fun.
Jane has a big doll. Peter has a ball.
Look, Jane, look! Look at the dog! See him run!
Here is mummy. She has baked a bun.
Here is the milkman. He has come to call.
Here is Peter. Here is Jane. They like fun.
Go Peter! Go Jane! Come milkman, come!
The milkman likes Mummy. She likes them all.
Look, Jane, look! Look at the dog! See him run! Here are the curtains. They shut out the sun.
Let us peep! On tiptoe Jane! You are small!
Here is Peter. Here is Jane. They like fun.
I hear a car, Jane. The milkman looks glum.
Here is daddy in his car. Daddy is tall.
Look, Jane, look! Look at the dog! See him run!
Daddy looks very cross. Has he a gun?
Up milkman! Up milkman! Over the wall!
Here is Peter. Here is Jane. They like fun.
Look, Jane, look! Look at the dog! See him run!

(Wendy Cope) Right, theory over, lets crack on, shall we? Looking Closer at Clauses

Participants – Those involved
Processes – Verbal group – Tells about the event
Circumstances – Prepositional and Adverbial
This is ideational metafunction Examples in the Text

Participant (Nominal Group) Process (verbal Group) Circumstance
The Milkman Looks Glum
I Hear
You Are Small Types of Processes with examples from the text:


Material

Active Process.

Come
Baked
Up
Run
Shut
Go Mental

Process of sensing. Voluntary or involuntary.

Look
Like
See
Hear Behavioural Existational Relational

Conscious being carrying out psychological behaviours. Something posited as existing. Someone being related to or identified with. Is
Are
His
Looks Run Shut Go This effectively draws the reader into the mindset of a child... ...And together with the short sentence length, gives the poem a fast, excited style pace, again linking to a child's mindset. On such a small poem, it is difficult to find lots of examples of the use of processes to create an atmosphere, but in 'Reading Scheme' you can see how the very select use of the linguistic elements in this area can have a profound effect on the reader. This has been Paige, Nicola and Matt We hope you enjoyed our presentation. Click 'HERE' for a picture of a cat with a smiling face. Here is Peter. Here is Jane. They like fun.
Jane has a big doll. Peter has a ball.
Look, Jane, look! Look at the dog! See him run!
Here is mummy. She has baked a bun.
Here is the milkman. He has come to call.
Here is Peter. Here is Jane. They like fun.
Go Peter! Go Jane! Come milkman, come!
The milkman likes Mummy. She likes them all.
Look, Jane, look! Look at the dog! See him run! Here are the curtains. They shut out the sun.
Let us peep! On tiptoe Jane! You are small!
Here is Peter. Here is Jane. They like fun.
I hear a car, Jane. The milkman looks glum.
Here is daddy in his car. Daddy is tall.
Look, Jane, look! Look at the dog! See him run!
Daddy looks very cross. Has he a gun?
Up milkman! Up milkman! Over the wall!
Here is Peter. Here is Jane. They like fun.
Look, Jane, look! Look at the dog! See him run!

(Wendy Cope) The absence of more complex processes
such as behavioral or relational. Peep Three
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