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Baroque and Dutch-Flemish Period

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Jenn Martinez

on 17 December 2013

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Transcript of Baroque and Dutch-Flemish Period

Baroque History
Baroque Style is similar to that of Renaissance
Began around the 1600 in Rome, Italy
Spread around Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries
Baroque Architecture
Artist
Italian Artist
Characterized great drama, rich, deep color, and intense light and dark shadows
Greatest sculptor of the 17th century and an outstanding architect
The style he evolved was carried on for two more generations in various parts of Europe
Created artwork expressing pressure and sensuality and less about religion
Gian Lorenzo Bernini
(December 7, 1589-November 28, 1680)
Began when the Catholic Church became corrupt
Floral Arrangements

During the era, they were used for more then just religion, expressed everyday circumstances
Traditionally the arrangements were in a tall urn-shaped vase, about 1 1/2 the height of the vessel itself.
Well-proportioned and quite compacted
Artists of that period never actually arranged the flower bouquets or painted their pictures using an actually arrangements.(This explains why short-stemmed flowers are positioned high and flower from all seasons are placed side by side.)
Another distinguishing characteristic of the arrangement is the great variety of flowers within one bouquet.
Dutch-Flemish
Baroque and Dutch-Flemish Era
By: Evelyn Matinez

&
Zara Taylor
By 1650, Baroque arrangements could be seen in paintings and tapestries of the period.
Early in the baroque period, arrangements were typically massed and overflowing.
They were often created as symmetrical, oval-shaped designs.
Later in the period, asymmetrical curves in the shape of an S or a crescent became popular
European culture generated a new artistic style after the 16th century, which is now known as the Baroque.
The term Baroque means "irregular" and is applied generally to the dynamic and undisciplined artistic creativity during the 17th century.
Continued...
Large containers held flamboyant arrangements that containing a variety flowers.
Popular flowers: iris, marigold, lily, peony, canna, narcissus, hollyhock, and roses
Accessories often incorporated in these arrangements.
Common people could afford flowers
Curved lines rather than straight
Massed and overflowing
"Flemish" refers to people from the medieval country of Flanders, which now covers parts of Belgium, France and Holland.
Flemish designs are inspired by the Flemish paintings of artists during the medieval period between the 15th, 16th and early 17th centuries.
Flemish painters depicted a wide variety of flowers that were gathered by British and Dutch merchants during their travels.
Flemish designs are inspired by the Flemish paintings of artists during the medieval period between the 15th, 16th and early 17th centuries.
Like the Baroque, Flemish had a Varitey of flowers in one arrangement and they used curing lines
Usually only one or two stems of a particular flower in a Flemish flower arrangement.
Flowers commonly seen in Flemish paintings are tulips, peonies, roses, marigolds, snowballs, iris and crown imperials.
Dutch-Flemish Arrangements
It is
common to see only one or two stems of a particular flower in a Flemish flower arrangement.
Although anything is permissible now, flowers commonly seen in Flemish paintings are tulips, peonies, roses, marigolds, snowballs, iris and crown imperials.
Flowers in Flemish style arrangements typically feature warm hues such as
yellow,

orange and red.
Art
Flemish Baroque painting are similar to those found in Dutch Golden Age painting, with artists specializing in such areas as history painting, portraiture, genre painting, and landscape painting.
Artist emphasized intense movement, color, and sensuality.
The Ecstasy of St Theresa (1647–1652)
Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi (1648-1651)
Work Cited
"Peter Paul Rubens - The Complete Works." Peter Paul Rubens - The Complete Works. N.p., 2002. Web. 17 Dec. 2013.

Donne, John. "THE PRE-MODERN." Baroque Culture. N.p., 2013. Web. 5 Dec. 2013.

"Gabriel Metsu - The Complete Works." Gabriel Metsu - The Complete Works. N.p., 2002. Web. 6 Dec. 2013.

Estrella, Espie. "Baroque Time Period." About.com Music Education. N.p., 2013. Web. 9 Dec. 2013.
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