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understanding adolescent development

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kristyll salen

on 24 February 2011

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Transcript of understanding adolescent development

Understanding
Adolescent Development what is adolescence? Adolescence is a transitional stage of human development characterized by a number of cognitive, emotional, physical and behavioral changes from age 11-19 Erikson's Psychosocial Stage of Devlopment Adolescent Developmental Tasks

8. DESIRING AND ACHIEVING.

Robert Havighurst (1972) 1. ACHIEVING NEW, MORE MATURE RELATIONS WITH AGE-MATES OF BOTH SEXES. 2. ACHIEVING A MASCULINE OR FEMININE SOCIAL ROLE. 4. ACHIEVING EMOTIONAL INDEPENDENCE OF
PARENTS AND OTHER ADULTS. 3. ACCEPTING ONE'S PHYSIQUE AND USING BODY EFFECTIVELY. 5. PREPARING FOR MARRIAGE
AND FAMILY LIFE.
6. PREPARING FOR AN
ECONOMIC CAREER.
7. ACQUIRING A SET OF VALUES AND AN ETHICAL SYSTEM AS A GUIDE TO BEHAVIOR.
DEVELOPING AN IDEOLOGICAL SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE BEHAVIOR. Psychosocial Stage 5 -
Identity vs. Confusion

During adolescence, children are exploring their independence and developing a sense of self.
• indicators related to developmental lag What are the physical changes that you noticed in your body? physical changes
11 to 14 years old how these physical changes affect adolescence? what do you think will help you go through these changes? cognitive changes how these cognitive changes affect adolescence? what do you think will help you go through these changes? emotional
changes what are the emotional changes that you're experiencing depression, suicide attempts
sense of isolation,
loneliness impulsiveness,
extreme rebellion denial of feelings
poor hygiene fantasy as an escape
from problems drug/alcohol abuse
sexual activity to provide
missing nurturance or prostitution stealing,
pathological lying,
running away, psychosis, fire-setting,
violent assault, truancy hatred and rejection
of family juvenile delinquency, pregnancy
early marriages that are likely to fail ACTIVITY Development of Secondary Sex Characteristics due to Hormonal Change
(1) Growth of pubic hair;
(2) menarche (first menstrual period for girls) or penis growth (for boys);
(3) voice changes (for boys);
(4) growth of underarm hair;
(5) facial hair growth (for boys); and
(6) the increased production of oil, increased sweat
gland activity, and the beginning of acne


Is concerned with appearance. Frequently sleep longer. On average, teens need about nine and a half hours of sleep a night. (Strauch, 2003) Maybe clumsy because
of growth spurts. Teen girls may become overly sensitive about their weight. May be concerned because they are not physically developing at the same
rate as their peers. Teens may feel awkward about demonstrating affection to the
opposite sex parent Begins to have interest and curiosity about sex or may feel awkward talking about it with parents or teachers Acne appears, especially with
certain types of skin. Rapid gains in Height
and Weight Girls are gradually reaching physical and sexual maturity. Boys are beginning to mature physically and sexually. Is concerned with appearance. How to cope with
these changes? get enough sleep Don’t criticize or compare
yourself to others. Practice healthy
eating habits Have physical activity e.g. sports, dancing, daily exercise Ask questions or issues about sex to your parents, teachers or guidance counselor
Allot enough time for
grooming habits Explain to your parents the your
need for own physical space what are the cognitive changes
that you noticed? ACTIVITY under construction Prefrontal cortex – responsible
for organizing, setting priorities, strategizing, controlling impulses Brain functions that help plan
and adapt to the social environment Connections between neurons affecting emotional, physical, and mental abilities are INCOMPLETE. (Strauch, 2003) Connections between neurons affecting emotional, physical, and mental abilities are INCOMPLETE. (Strauch, 2003) Early Adolescents 11-13 years old
* Use of more complex thinking is focused on personal decision making in school and home environments

(*) Begins to form and verbalize his/her own thoughts and views on a variety of topics, usually more related to his / her own life (*) Begins to demonstrate use of formal logical operations in schoolwork. (*) Begins to question authority and society standards. increasing ability to organize and reflect on the information which allows engagement to more readily higher-order thinking process capable of abstract thinking begins to use reasoning skills begins to increse
decision-making abilities Middle adolescence 15-18 years old Often questions and analyzes
more extensively Use of systematic thinking begins to influence relationship with others thinks about different posibilities and begins to develop own identity thinks about and begins to make his/her own plans shows desires to achieve his plans Begins to think long term.
During late adolescence, complex thinking processes are used to focus on less self-centered concepts as well as personal decision making Thinks about and begins to form his / her own code of ethics Demonstrate a heightened level
of self-consciousness. As a way of demonstrating their independence would make decisions without other significant persons consent Teens tend to become very
reactive Tends to exhibit a “justice” operation
based on own perception Teens demonstrate a heightened sense of curiosity and risk-taking behavior.
Teens tend to exhibit
“it can’t happen to me” How to cope with
these changes? Build a genuine relationship with your parents and teachers or other trusted adults talk about your views and be open to other opinions think independently and develop your own ideas Understand how your emotions may influence your thinking and behavior understand how your choices or decisions affect others Learn from concrete situations
"GOFER"- goals, options, facts, effects, and review;
"GOOP"- goals, options, outcomes, and probabilities Gradually, make decisions of your own. ask for assistance in re-evaluating poorly made decisions for yourself Find positive ways to correct your mistakes. Don’t discount
adult experiences Try to discuss your
behavioral rules and consequences with your parents or guardians Participate in controlled risky
behavior, however do it with your parents consent Get involved in community service
and other purposive activities Focus on self intense preoccupation with
one's own feelings Lack of connection to feelings of others anxiety from more challenging school work eating problems usually start during this phase has better ability to express feelings begins to experience emotional instability from time to time Less affection shown toward parents. Expressing anger struggles with the need to exercise independence from authority figures and be accepted by own peers Greatly influencea by peer group Find association with those who have similar interest, values and make them feel understood and secure. Shows curiosity Begins to formulate and revise self concept Exhibit interest and personal satisfaction towards achievement and recognitiom Finds support and recreation from peers. Tends to be critical of people increase interest in relating with opposite sex tends to demand the right of coping with their own problems Social insight improves as a result of broader opportunities for social participation how these emotional changes affect adolescence? Social competency is greater Gain self-confidence able to judge members of the opposite sex may tend to be choosey in the selection of associates and friends Socio-Emotional Issues Establishing an identity Establishing autonomy Establishing intimacy Becoming comfortable with
one’s sexuality Achievement What do you think will help you go through these changes? SHOUTOUT!!! conclusion
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