Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Grammar Boot Camp #2: Making the Write Connections to Avoid Comma Splices, Fused Sentences, and Fragments

No description
by

Kaley Keene

on 2 March 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Grammar Boot Camp #2: Making the Write Connections to Avoid Comma Splices, Fused Sentences, and Fragments

Dependent Clauses
What makes a DC a DC if it still has a subject and a verb too? Answer: subordinating conjunctions or relative pronouns.

ex.
Before
I go to class...

Who
lights up my day...

They don't make sense, do they? If someone were to approach you saying one of the above, and just that alone, you'd be utterly confused. You'd be left saying "And...?"
Formulas to create a sentence.
IC.
IC; IC. (Don't capitalize the first word after the semicolon unless it is a proper noun.)
IC; transitional word, IC.
ICDC.
IC, FANBOYS IC.
DC, IC.



Common Subordinating Conjunctions
After, Although, Before, Because, Even if, If, Now that, Since, Though, Whenever, While

*More subordination conjunctions are on you handouts and in your
Little Seagull Handbook
.
I am Kaley. (IC.)
I enjoy school; I love to read. (IC;IC)
I have poor eyesight; therefore, I have to wear glasses. (IC; trans. word, IC.)
I exercise before I go to work every morning. (ICDC.)
I feed my cat before work, but I sometimes forget to change her litter until after wok. (IC, FANBOY IC.)
Before I go to bed, I brush my teeth. (DC, IC.)
Thank you!
There are two kinds of clauses...
Independent Clauses (IC) and Dependent Clauses (DC) are where subjects and verbs live. In order to create a sentence, there must be at least one IC within a sentence.

ex. of an IC: "
She

loves
to eat cake."

Subject
: She;
verb
: loves.
Now that you know how to use IC's and DC's, go forth and practice using them and identifying them!
Grammar Boot Camp #2: Making the Write Connections to Avoid Comma Splices, Fused Sentences, and Fragments
By SL. Kaley Keene
Transitional Words
Also, Besides, Finally, Furtherore, However, In addition, Indeed, On the other hand, Otherwise, Still, Then, Therefore, Thus, Undoubtedly

*Look at your handouts or look in your
Little Seagull Handbook
for more transitional words.
Realtive Pronouns:
Who/Whom, Which/That, Whoever/Whomever, Whose
Common Mistakes when Ignoring these rules
Fused Sentence: You believe in Santa you're a child. Corrected: If you believe in Santa, you're a child.
DC, IC.

Comma Splice: I love cats, I have a cat.
Corrected: I love cats. I have a cat.
IC. IC.

Fragment: When I go to class.
Corrected: When I go to class, I sometimes fall asleep.
DC, IC.
Minor Errors
Before I go to work I brush my teeth.

Corrected: Before I go to work, I brush my teeth. (DC, IC.)

I believe that my bother will do well this year, because he has really changed as a person.

Corrected: I believe that my brother will do well this year because he has really changed as a person. (ICDC.)
Full transcript