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Persuasive Appeals and Propaganda Techniques

Details on Logos, Ethos, Pathos and different techniques to persuade
by

Lindsey Corley

on 24 March 2015

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Transcript of Persuasive Appeals and Propaganda Techniques

Persuasion and Propaganda
Persuasion
Persuasive Appeals
Pathos
Name Calling
Propaganda Techniques for the "Pathos" Appeal
Humor
Glittering Generalities
~We use the concept of persuasion to try to get
people to come to OUR way of thinking.
~We ask others to BELIEVE us, to LISTEN to us,
to TRUST us.
There are THREE Main ways we use our powers
of persuasion to win an argument:

1) An appeal to Pathos
2) An appeal to Logos
3) An appeal to Ethos
The "emotional" argument.
Techniques are specific ways appeals can be made in arguments.
Making one product look bad and the other look better
Grabs the audience's attention by making them laugh
Use of 'virtue' words; the opposite of name-calling
or how to win an argument
When an author or speaker tells a story, or uses examples, or is just very passionate about their topic and delivery, an appeal to Pathos has been made.
Name Calling
Humor
Glittering Generalities
Loaded Words
Nostalgia
Sex Appeal
Fear
Patriotism
Transfer
Loaded Words
New! Fantastic! Gorgeous!

Strong statements listed in the ad
Fear
Anything meant to scare us into believing or buying something
Sex Appeal
Using pretty people to sell an idea or product
Patriotism
Shows American values, strong family ethics, beautiful countrysides, and hardworking cowboys
Nostalgia
Using pictures, words or phrases that evoke memories of the past or 'the good old days'
Logos
The Logical Appeal
An appeal to logos is made when an argument or an advertisement uses the truth, the facts, the LOGICAL information to persuade.
Techniques:
Repetition
Salience
Omission
Unwarranted Extrapolation
Black and White Fallacies
Repetition
repeating the same thing over and over again so the audience remembers it
Salience
when consumers remember a specific part of an ad and are more likely to buy because they can associate something they remember with the product.
Omission
The facts are not the focus of the ad
Unwarranted Extrapolation
making huge predictions about the future on the basis of a few small facts.
Ethos
The Ethics of the Speaker/Presenter
An appeal to Ethos is made when the audience must consider WHO is speaking/making a claim. Is the speaker trustworthy? Is the speaker believable?
Techniques:
Testimonials
Image
Association
Plain Folks
Bandwagon
Patriotism/Sex Appeal
Testimonials
Using "real stories" of people who have used the product or have done what you're saying
Image
Links products or arguments to attractiveness and enjoyment
Association
Associated with having fun, being popular or feeling good with a specific product or idea
Plain Folks
Using 'real' people to sell 'down home' ideas or products
Bandwagon
Everyone is doing it/following it/believing it.
Transfer
projecting positive or negative qualities (praise or blame) of one person or idea to another in order to make something more acceptable or discredit it.
example: "Our candidate is an active member of his church. He will make an excellent Senator!!
Black and White Fallacies
To present only two choices, with the author's idea or product being better than the other choice.
ex: "Drive a hybrid car. Otherwise, YOU are part of the air-pollution problem!"
Full transcript