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Abraham Lincoln

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tyler abner

on 13 April 2015

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Transcript of Abraham Lincoln

Work Experience
Photos
Chief Administrator
Chief Citizen
During the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln did not get much respect as a military leader. Lincoln himself deprecated his expertise even as he pushed West Point generals into more aggressive action. He gave advice to the commander of the Army of the Potomac in May 1863 after the Battle of Chancellorsville.
Abraham Lincoln was committed to preserving the Union and thus vindicating democracy no matter what the consequences to himself, the Union was indeed saved. He understood that ending slavery required patience, careful timing, shrewd calculations, and an iron resolve, slavery was indeed killed. Lincoln managed in the process of saving the Union and killing slavery to define the creation of a more perfect Union in terms of liberty and economic equality that rallied the citizenry behind him.
Education
Lincoln attend a log cabin school as a boy
He wasnt very well educated at this point
In 1834 however he started law school
In 1836 he receive his license to law.
Lincoln farmed worked as a young boy
He had always shown his ability to be a speaker
His first earned money was rowing people to a steamboat midstream of the Ohio river.
He served in the service for 90 days never saw a fight.
He ran for state legislator in 1832 but dint have much of a campaign do to the black hawk war.
Born in Larue, Kentucky in 1809.
In 1816 moved to Spencer county, Indiana.
1830 Abe and his dad moved to Illinois.
Abe moved to Springfield and met Mary Todd
Chief of Party
Early living
Abraham Lincoln
February 12, 1809 April 15, 1865

Lincoln believed in the Whig theory of the presidency, which left Congress to write the laws while he signed them, vetoing only bills that threatened his war powers.

Head of State
During the Civil War, Lincoln appropriated powers no previous President had wielded: he used his war powers to proclaim a blockade, suspended the writ of habeas corpus, spent money without congressional authorization, and imprisoned 18,000 suspected Confederate sympathizers without trial. Nearly all of his actions, although vehemently denounced by the Copperheads, were subsequently upheld by Congress and the Courts.
Lincoln's Presidency
Lincoln's Death
Commander in Chief
Family
Lincoln was a self-taught strategist with no combat experience, Abraham Lincoln saw the path to victory more clearly than his generals
Lincoln's only military experience had come in 1832, when he was captain of a militia unit that saw no action in the Black Hawk War
A historian T. Harry Williams states "Lincoln stands out as a great war president, probably the greatest in our history, and a great natural strategist, a better one than any of his generals."
Lincoln has 4 children, William Wallace Lincoln, Robert Todd Lincoln, Edward Baker Lincoln, and Tad Lincoln.
His parents names were Thomas and Nancy Lincoln.
Lincoln's wives name was Mary Todd Lincoln.
Slavery was a heated subject during Lincoln's election.
He lost the race for U.S. Senate and then spent 16 months traveling the Northern States of the U.S. campaigning to the Republicans.
The election of 1860 positioned the nation on the brink of fundamental change.
When the votes were tallied, Lincoln, who was not on the ballot in any southern state, carried all of the North but one state in the popular vote.
Abraham Lincoln's presidential campaign victory lit the fuse that would explode into the Civil War.
On April 3, 1865, Abraham Lincoln entered Richmond, Virginia, the Confederate capital.A few miles away, the commander of the Confederate Army of Virginia, General Robert E. Lee and his army of 35,000 men, confronted Grant's 120,000 blue coats. Five days later, as the victorious Lincoln watched Laura Keen's light comedy Our American Cousin at Ford's Theater in Washington, D.C., a darkly clad figure burst through the door of Lincoln's box in the balcony and shot the President in the back of the head.The assassin, John Wilkes Booth, leaped from the box to the stage to make his escape, shouting "Sic semper Tyrannies!"(The South is avenged!)
Chief Legislator
Chief Executive
Chief Diplomat
The Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act, also signed in 1862, provided government grants for agricultural universities in each state. Lincoln also signed the Pacific Railway Acts of 1862 and 1864, which granted federal support to the construction of the United States' first transcontinental railroad, which was completed in 1869. Other important legislation involved money matters, including the first income tax and higher tariffs. Also included was the creation of the system of national banks by the National Banking Acts of 1863, 1864, and 1865 which allowed the creation of a strong national financial system.


Abraham Lincoln kept Britain and France from helping the Confederates, by issuing the Emancipation Proclamation, turning the war into an official crusade against slavery while acting as Chief Diplomat.
During the Civil War, Lincoln appropriated powers no previous President had wielded: he used his war powers to proclaim a blockade, suspended the writ of habeas corpus, spent money without congressional authorization, and imprisoned 18,000 suspected Confederate sympathizers without trial. Nearly all of his actions, although vehemently denounced by the Copperheads, were subsequently upheld by Congress and the Courts.
Sources
(2015).
A Life in Brief
. from http://www.millercenter.org/presidents

The Economist Newspaper. (2015).
The Life and Administration of Abraham Lincoln.
Jul 29th, 1865. http://www.economist.com

Joshua Zeitz (February 2014).
The History of How We Came to Revere Abraham Lincoln.
From http://www.smithsonianmag.com



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