Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

CHINUA ACHEBE -THINGS FALL APART

Things Fall Apart
by

Ezekiel Olagoke

on 9 October 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of CHINUA ACHEBE -THINGS FALL APART

Things Fall Apart
chinua Achebe Setting African Savannah (Nigeria) Igbo Tribe (9 Villages) Village of Umofia Early to mid 1800s 1st wife Catherine of Aragon Gives birth to princess Mary The Relation to the Novel Okonkwo desperation for a true son Love for Ezinma "Lord" of his household. Post Colonialism European Colonization of Africa British Territory of Nigeria Controlled 2/3 of the world by the late 1800s Negative effect on the Igbo people Spread of Christianity Symbols Evil Forest Negative place Christians build church on the forest lands In viewpoint of the Africans their Religion is evil Some believe it is truly powerful for thriving on the evil lands. Feminism Eco-Critcism Yam farming Controlled by weather Objectional Treatment of Women In The Novel Society is controlled by the farming Used in almost every dish fr Role of the WOmen in The novel cook- Ikemefuna Each of Okonkwo's wives prepare him a meal every night. Stepson of Okonkwo Male "son" figure Okonkwo ordered to sacrifice Ikemefuna Haunted him until his death Okonkwo Attempts to shoot wife (Page 28) Okonkwo's Gun Strength, Power, Authority Okonkwo teaches son to 'control his woman folk (Page 37) Rise of Colonization Okonkwo would appreciate his daughter better if she were a boy (Page 32) Woman was beaten and sent back to her husband 'Woman' is used as an insult among the men Child Care- Women teach the children how to act, how to work and how things are done. Major Themes Fear: Ambition: Karma (Justice): Okonkwo fear of being weak Of defying their gods Of change (Christians) Okonkwo to become clan chief Church to convert the Africans Okonwko kills himself in the end Rash behavior causes exile Characters Okonkwo -Protaganist -Arrogant -Hypocrit -Warrior -Caring for family Christians -Greedy
-One sided
-Stubborn
-Ignorant Ezinma -Eldest daughter
-Masculine
-Loved her the most Nwoye -Eldest son
-Disgrace
-Lazy and weak
-Under pressure Ikemefuna -Compensation
-Very masculin
-Sacrificed by Okonkwo
-Haunted Okonkwo Plot Death of a girl in the village Umofia. Ikemefuna brought from the village who killed the girl in compensation. Few years past and Ikemefuna is sacrificed by Okonkwo. Things begin to fall apart for Okonkwo. Ezinma becomes very sick. Okonkwo is banished for an accidental killing of a young boy due to his gun exploding. Europeans start to enter the story and scene. After Okonkwo's return he is captured by the British with his leaders and held for ransom After his release, in anger he kills a British messenger and is ordered to be caught. Okonkwo hangs himself in fear of being caught. Any guesses of why these are here? What do you think the main message is in this book? Women truly do have an important role? So where was this? When did it happen? The British are coming !!! Chinua Achebe Born in 1930 in Nigeria


Was apart of the Christian Missionary
society. Recived Nigerias highest award for
intellectual acheivment Locust Locusts settled over everything in the book.

The christans settle in Africa to and ruin the peaceful way the Igbo people lived. Tolerance Chapter 14-17: Okonkwo's Exile Reception by Uchendu, his mother’s younger brother.

Starting all over again; despair and dejection, admonishment by Uchendu.

Mother is Supreme – “Nneka” – running to his mother’s abode, when beaten.

Reminder that strength is not synonymous with force and violence; nor is strength uniquely a male domain.

Chapter 15:

Visit by Obierika – second year of his exile

Disturbing news: Abame is destroyed ( a neighboring village cluster like Umuofia).

Iron horse and the white man: interpretation of the coming of the white man: cf. Native Americans

Killing of the white man and tying up his iron horse.

Retribution – the entire village wiped out.

Reaction: “men of Abame are fools.”

Foreshadows of the future of Umuofia.

Murder of one man, excessive killing of many Ibos.

Cf. thoughtfulness of Uchendu, and the fear of fear
Chapter 16
White missionaries are now in Umofia;
Nwoye is among the Christians
Missionaries now in Mbanta; only Christian God is the real God.

Okonkwo’s response: anger.

Disintegration of Ibo society
Central to the book.
Christianity and division in society;
Dividing father and son, attack on the very heart of Ibo culture.

Chapter 17:

Space requested for church.; plot given in the Evil Forest

The forest is full of malevolent spirits/energies.

Nothing happens to the Christians

Treatment of twins in Ibo culture

Attack of Nwoye by his father upon seeing him in church; the boy left for Umofia for missionary school

Comfort in Christianity, rebel against his father too, for Nwoye, undermining of the hierarchies of the cultures. Women too: Nneka and four pairs of twins perished, now the new religion: Mother is supreme.

Land and the church – difficulty to unlodge

Okonkwo never learns. Chapter 18:
Rescuing twins from the forest by Christians
New religion: ostrazism of the convers; denial of privileges
Outcasts – their roles
Okonkwo – again calls for war
Chapter 19:

End of exile, money sent to Obierika to build new huts
Feast given before his return to Umofia

Chapter 20:
Church is now powerful in Umofia,
Men of titled joined the church, court house is also there.
DC imposes white law, prison;
Okonkwo is angry, difficulty of resistance
He has put a knife on the things that held us together and we have fallen apart, pages 126-27
Umofia has changed.

Chapter 21: Christian led by Mr. Brown, very nice
Learns about the local religion, recruitment
Nwoye is now called Isaac
Attends Teacher College in Umaru;
Visit by Mr. Brown: not pleasant as Okonkwo chased him outTrouble with the new religion, new government
Chapter 22:
Mr. Brown is replaced with Rev. James Smith.
Not tolerant like Mr. Brown
Battle between Egwugwu and Christians; unmasking of the Egwugwu by Christian Enoch.
Destruction of the church.
Chapter 23:
Okonkwo pleased with the destruction of the church.
Return of the DC: invited six leaders of Umofia, a trap – the men were taken prisoners
Okonkwo in prison, humiliated and beaten.
Fine of 250 bags of cowrie to be paid.
Theme of justice.
Justice is impossible under the new system

Chapter 24:Okonkwo seethes with anger and hatred.Okonkwo resolves to fight, even if alone.
5 court messengers came up;
Okonkwo struck them with matchet, killing one, walks away.
Chapter 25:
Okonkwo hanged himself.
Suicide a crime against the earth goddess.
Will be buried like an animal. Part II - Exile of okonkwo Okonkwo’s exile – new life
Both personal and communal disaster
Okonkwo compared to a fish out of water.
Despair and hopelessness of Okonkwo
Comfort, comfort , O people:
Motherland: fatherland – roles of each –
Okonkwo was back with his mother’s clan –
Page 134 “mother is supreme.
Seven years of exile should not dampen faith
Colonial Policy: Anglophone, Lusophone,
Francophone revisited:
"Iron horse." what is it?
Gods, Allah or juju
Nwoye - Isaac,
Enoch, Osu, I fear the younger generation: they do not know the bond of kinship - page 167
Abominable religion is here
Tradition versus modernity
Does the white man understand our custom
We are falling apart - page 176

MISSIONARY ZEAL
Mr. Brown and Mrs. Smith Contrasted
Accommodation versus compromise

OKONKWO'S END Closing section More works by Achebe: No Longer At Ease, Arrow of God, Anthills in the Savanah
Taught in Universities in US: UniMassachusset, Amherst
Bard College – New York – where he currently teaches with his wife Achebe is married with four children
1990 – Motor Accident from Lagos-Ibadan road left him paralyzed from the waist down – permanently on the wheel chair. Achebe Background continued Language
Mr. Brown and Mr. Smith – critique of evangelism
Things fall apart – the center does not hold – page 183 “Okonkwo was deeply grieved. And it was not just a personal grief. He mourned for the clan, which he was breaking up and “falling apart.” and he mourned for the warlike men of Umuofia who had so unaccountably become soft like women.”
Okonkwo’s suicide Gospel in cultures Achebe
Wole Soyinka
V.Y. Mudimbe
Crisis of faith Achebe and the Christian faith Mr. Brown and Mr. Smith: contrasted.
Accommodation condemned no compromise with gods of wood and stone. Missionary Zeal “Osu” – the wretched of the earth – first converts to Christianity.
“I fear the younger generation – they do not know the bond of kinship” 167
You do not speak again with one voice – abominable religion is among you.
Old ways: tradition versus modernity.
Missionaries and colonialism – often colluded with the British
Land in traditional life
“Does the white man understand our custom about land? (page 176) “We are falling apart” Closing Section Ibo gods or deities – challenge of the scripture – i.e. Elijah.
Missionary challenge and tales of faith
Evangelism in action – singing and the gospel tradition
Argument about the trinity – Okonkwo and the christians – does your god have a wife (page 147)
Nwoye – and his captivation with the new religion – “the poetry of the new religion.” Soul searching questions: Ikemefuna; lost souls, twins; the existential search for meaning.
“Secret Christian” for a while “FBI type of Christianity.” His dad’s reaction 151 – 6 abandoning the gods of his fathers Gods, Allah; or juju Variation according to the colonial powers
British – Indirect rule
French – Assimmilation
Destruction of Abame – consequences of disobeying colonial subjects – see Yoruba examples too
Views of whites
Use of educated Ibos or non-Ibos as intermediaries
Dynamics of power structure
White man’s iron horses – its common place in the villages Colonial Policy Okonkwo’s exile – new life
Not just a personal disaster, but a communal one
Okonkwo compared to a fish out of water.
Despair and hopelessness of Okonkwo – he became depressed.
Comfort, comfort , O people:
Motherland: fatherland – roles of each – Okonkwo was back with his mother’s clan – page 134 “mother is supreme.
Seven years of exile should not dampen his faith Part II The tortoise story – the significance of the tortoise in Nigeria folk tales and stories – page 97
Characteristics of the tortoise
Cunning, sweet tongue, charming. – the orator
“All of you.” – name of the tortoise in the story
Fall of tortoise – why it has a crooked shell.
Note the use of “Agbala” on page 100-01 – oracular invocation – Priestess of Agbala
Traditional village and the market place Festivals What are Okonkwo’s virtues?
What has his faults and vices?
What does the proverb “when a man says yes to his chi, his chi also says yes – what does it mean?
How would you describe Nwoye’s affection for Nkemefuna? See page 34.
Theory of Just War – how was this manifested
Possession of cowries – page 7 (significance of cowries)
How do you assess Ibo belief systems?
Death of children – what is attributed to this?
Notice the words “ogbanje” – or “abiku.” Okonkwo – the man -questions Introduction to the prowess of Okonkwo,
Visit by Okoye, the musician, orator, - exchange of kola
Description of Okonkwo father, Unoka – lazy, without title – he was a musician (flute player)
Drum of war? Meeting of the elders of the villages
Powerful Umofia in war and magic
Oracle; Village democracy (mostly men)
Fear of being “agbala “ - “woman” (page 13)
Priestess – Chika – Agbala Oracle – consultation.
Unoka’s death – bad “chi” – buried in the forest
What did he die of? Chapters 1,2 3 “If a child knows how to wash his hands, he or she will eat with kings and elders.”
“Eneke the bird says since men have known how to shoot without missing, he has decided to fly without perching.” – page 22
“A tree does not make a forest.”
“The lizard that jumped from the high iroko tree to the ground said he would praise himself if no one else did.” – page 21 Notable Proverbs Berlin Conference 0 1884-1885
Partition of Africa into many spheres of colonial control:
Anglophone
Francophone
Lusophone
External versus internal colonialism
Vestiges of colonialism – still prevalent or not? Colonial policy: Africa Kola – stimulant – comparable to tea or coffee
Kola is one ingredient after which Coca Cola is named
Ritual of sharing cola – Ibo customs – also Yoruba and other cultures in Nigeria as well.
Importance of titles
Palm oil; palm tree; palm wine; palm kernel
Usages: building, drinking, export, etc.
Attitude toward women.
Polygamy
Chi – personal spirit (Daemon of Socrates) – “Oracle”
Ranking system in the society Notable words continued Okonkwo: - strongman “the Cat”
existential struggle internally and externally
Ibo village: Nigeria and social change (1890)
Unoka – Okonkwo’s father
Umofia, Mbaino – collection of villages (Umofia is translated in Ibo as “people of the forest.”
Nwoye – Okonkwo’s son – convert to Christianity
Ikemefuna
Agbala/Agbala
Proverbs - “the palm oil with which words are eaten.”
Egwugwu festival – see Yoruba “egungun.” Notables in the book CONTEXT OF YEATS WRITING OF
THE SECOND COMING
(collapse of confidence after the greatwar): great heritage of Western civilization is crumbling – barbarism is unleashed)
NIGERIAN BRITISH EDUCATION:
Personal excursus:
From Shakespeare to American experience Yeats THE SECOND COMING:
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the center cannot hold
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity William Butler Yeats Language spoken: Ibo
Administrative Language of Nigeria: English
Achebe was born in 1930
Graduate of Government College, Umuahia
University College, Ibadan (University of Ibadan
Major: English, History and Theology
Other African/Nigerian Writers: Amos Tutuola Wole Soyinka, James Ngugi (now Nwa-thiongo – from Kenya.
English Name: Albert – named after the husband of Queen Victoria of England. Achebe continued Chinua Achebe: “God hear !!! God Keep!!! – ejaculatory prayer – David, Peter, Paul.
Importance of names in Africa: “Abolade”
Country of Origin: Nigeria
Nigeria was a former British Colony
Nigeria became independent from Britain in 1960
Achebe from the eastern part of Nigeria (Ogidi)
Ethnic Origin: Igbo or Ibo
Major Nigerian Ethnic groups: Hausa, Yoruba, and Ibo
Population of Nigeria: 140 Million – growing
Similarities with the Yoruba: Chinua Achebe - Background Map of Nigeria Africa Map Class Lecture: Ezekiel Olagoke
Waynesburg University, fall 2011 Feast of the new yam –
Foofoo – or fufu (pounded yam)– staple like marshed potato eaten with stew.
Drums revisited.
Role of locusts – biblical examples – page 55
Oracle of the Hills and the Cave – death of Ikemefuna and Okonkwo’s indictment – could not eat for two days
Ezinma – the daughter
Okonkwo’s attitude towards his daughter – affectionate
Young women and marriageable age. Okonkwo - continued Kola nut sharing in ceremonies MACBETH Accursed be that tongue that tells me so, For it hath cow'd my better part of man! And be these juggling fiends no more believed, That palter with us in a double sense; That keep the word of promise to our ear, And break it to our hope. I'll not fight with thee. MACDUFF Then yield thee, coward, And live to be the show and gaze o' the time: We'll have thee, as our rarer monsters are, Painted on a pole, and underwrit, 'Here may you see the tyrant.' MACBETH I will not yield, To kiss the ground before young Malcolm's feet, And to be baited with the rabble's curse. Though Birnam wood be come to Dunsinane, And thou opposed, being of no woman born, Yet I will try the last. Before my body I throw my warlike shield. Lay on, Macduff, And damn'd be him that first cries, 'Hold, enough!' Exeunt, fighting. Alarums Why should I play the Roman fool, and die On mine own sword? whiles I see lives, the gashes Do better upon them. Enter MACDUFF
MACDUFF Turn, hell-hound, turn! MACBETH Of all men else I have avoided thee: But get thee back; my soul is too much charged With blood of thine already. MACDUFF I have no words: My voice is in my sword: thou bloodier villain Than terms can give thee out! They fight
MACBETH Thou losest labour: As easy mayst thou the intrenchant air With thy keen sword impress as make me bleed: Let fall thy blade on vulnerable crests; I bear a charmed life, which must not yield, To one of woman born. MACDUFF Despair thy charm; And let the angel whom thou still hast served Tell thee, Macduff was from his mother's womb Untimely ripp'd. Shakespeare - Macbeth Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second coming is at hand;
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in the sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man
A gaze bland and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?
  Yeats continued
THINGS FALL APART:
First published in 1958 – two years before Nigerian independence
Title of the book, “Things Fall Apart” derived from William Butler Yeats; “The Second Coming” (1921)
Yeats was attracted to spiritual and occult world
Yeats was captivated to explain human experience.
Second Coming was written after the catastrophic event of the First World War.
Era of Communism, fascism rising.
Second Coming – first advent, Jesus irruption into the human history
Later to be followed by other cataclysmic events Things Fall Apart Aesthetic significance
Political significance
Economic significance
Religious significance
Communicative significance
Ceremonial significance

Drum from Yoruba and Ibo Perspectives - The African Drum Language
Mr. Brown and Mr. Smith – critique of evangelism
Things fall apart – the center does not hold – page 183 “Okonkwo was deeply grieved. And it was not just a personal grief. He mourned for the clan, which he was breaking up and “falling apart.” and he mourned for the warlike men of Umuofia who had so unaccountably become soft like women.”
Okonkwo’s suicide Gospel in cultures Mr. Brown and Mr. Smith: contrasted.
Accommodation condemned no compromise with gods of wood and stone. Missionary Zeal “Osu” – the wretched of the earth – first converts to Christianity.
“I fear the younger generation – they do not know the bond of kinship” 167
You do not speak again with one voice – abominable religion is among you.
Old ways: tradition versus modernity.
Missionaries and colonialism – often colluded with the British
Land in traditional life
“Does the white man understand our custom about land? (page 176) “We are falling apart” Closing Section Ibo gods or deities – challenge of the scripture – i.e. Elijah.
Missionary challenge and tales of faith
Evangelism in action – singing and the gospel tradition
Argument about the trinity – Okonkwo and the christians – does your god have a wife (page 147)
Nwoye – and his captivation with the new religion – “the poetry of the new religion.” Soul searching questions: Ikemefuna; lost souls, twins; the existential search for meaning.
“Secret Christian” for a while “FBI type of Christianity.” His dad’s reaction 151 – 6 abandoning the gods of his fathers Gods, Allah; or juju Variation according to the colonial powers
British – Indirect rule
French – Assimmilation
Destruction of Abame – consequences of disobeying colonial subjects – see Yoruba examples too
Views of whites
Use of educated Ibos or non-Ibos as intermediaries
Dynamics of power structure
White man’s iron horses – its common place in the villages Colonial Policy The tortoise story – the significance of the tortoise in Nigeria folk tales and stories – page 97
Characteristics of the tortoise
Cunning, sweet tongue, charming. – the orator
“All of you.” – name of the tortoise in the story
Fall of tortoise – why it has a crooked shell.
Note the use of “Agbala” on page 100-01 – oracular invocation – Priestess of Agbala
Traditional village and the market place Festivals Feast of the new yam –
Foofoo – or fufu (pounded yam)– staple like marshed potato eaten with stew.
Drums revisited.
Role of locusts – biblical examples – page 55
Oracle of the Hills and the Cave – death of Ikemefuna and Okonkwo’s indictment – could not eat for two days
Ezinma – the daughter
Okonkwo’s attitude towards his daughter – affectionate
Young women and marriageable age. Okonkwo - continued What are Okonkwo’s virtues?
What has his faults and vices?
What does the proverb “when a man says yes to his chi, his chi also says yes – what does it mean?
How would you describe Nwoye’s affection for Nkemefuna? See page 34.
Theory of Just War – how was this manifested
Possession of cowries – page 7 (significance of cowries)
How do you assess Ibo belief systems?
Death of children – what is attributed to this?
Notice the words “ogbanje” – or “abiku.” Okonkwo – the man -questions “If a child knows how to wash his hands, he or she will eat with kings and elders.”
“Eneke the bird says since men have known how to shoot without missing, he has decided to fly without perching.” – page 22
“A tree does not make a forest.”
“The lizard that jumped from the high iroko tree to the ground said he would praise himself if no one else did.” – page 21 Notable Proverbs Berlin Conference 0 1884-1885
Partition of Africa into many spheres of colonial control:
Anglophone
Francophone
Lusophone
External versus internal colonialism
Vestiges of colonialism – still prevalent or not? Colonial policy: Africa Kola nut sharing in ceremonies Kola – stimulant – comparable to tea or coffee
Kola is one ingredient after which Coca Cola is named
Ritual of sharing cola – Ibo customs – also Yoruba and other cultures in Nigeria as well.
Importance of titles
Palm oil; palm tree; palm wine; palm kernel
Usages: building, drinking, export, etc.
Attitude toward women.
Polygamy
Chi – personal spirit (Daemon of Socrates) – “Oracle”
Ranking system in the society Notable words continued Okonkwo: - strongman “the Cat”
existential struggle internally and externally
Ibo village: Nigeria and social change (1890)
Unoka – Okonkwo’s father
Umofia, Mbaino – collection of villages (Umofia is translated in Ibo as “people of the forest.”
Nwoye – Okonkwo’s son – convert to Christianity
Ikemefuna
Agbala/Agbala
Proverbs - “the palm oil with which words are eaten.”
Egwugwu festival – see Yoruba “egungun.” Notables in the book CONTEXT OF YEATS WRITING OF
THE SECOND COMING
(collapse of confidence after the greatwar): great heritage of Western civilization is crumbling – barbarism is unleashed)
NIGERIAN BRITISH EDUCATION:
Personal excursus:
From Shakespeare to American experience Yeats Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second coming is at hand;
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in the sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man
A gaze bland and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?
  Yeats continued
THINGS FALL APART:
First published in 1958 – two years before Nigerian independence
Title of the book, “Things Fall Apart” derived from William Butler Yeats; “The Second Coming” (1921)
Yeats was attracted to spiritual and occult world
Yeats was captivated to explain human experience.
Second Coming was written after the catastrophic event of the First World War.
Era of Communism, fascism rising.
Second Coming – first advent, Jesus irruption into the human history
Later to be followed by other cataclysmic events Things Fall Apart More works by Achebe: No Longer At Ease, Arrow of God, Anthills in the Savanah
Taught in Universities in US: UniMassachusset, Amherst
Bard College – New York – where he currently teaches with his wife Achebe is married with four children
1990 – Motor Accident from Lagos-Ibadan road left him paralyzed from the waist down – permanently on the wheel chair. Achebe Background continued Language spoken: Ibo
Administrative Language of Nigeria: English
Achebe was born in 1930
Graduate of Government College, Umuahia
University College, Ibadan (University of Ibadan
Major: English, History and Theology
Other African/Nigerian Writers: Amos Tutuola Wole Soyinka, James Ngugi (now Nwa-thiongo – from Kenya.
English Name: Albert – named after the husband of Queen Victoria of England. Achebe continued Aesthetic significance
Political significance
Economic significance
Religious significance
Communicative significance
Ceremonial significance

Drum from Yoruba and Ibo Perspectives - The African Drum Map of Nigeria Africa Map Class Lecture: Ezekiel Olagoke
Waynesburg University, fall 2012 Achebe
Wole Soyinka
V.Y. Mudimbe
Crisis of faith Achebe and the Christian faith Okonkwo’s exile – new life
Not just a personal disaster, but a communal one
Okonkwo compared to a fish out of water.
Despair and hopelessness of Okonkwo – he became depressed.
Comfort, comfort , O people:
Motherland: fatherland – roles of each – Okonkwo was back with his mother’s clan – page 134 “mother is supreme.
Seven years of exile should not dampen his faith Part II Introduction to the prowess of Okonkwo,
Visit by Okoye, the musician, orator, - exchange of kola
Description of Okonkwo father, Unoka – lazy, without title – he was a musician (flute player)
Drum of war? Meeting of the elders of the villages
Powerful Umofia in war and magic
Oracle; Village democracy (mostly men)
Fear of being “agbala “ - “woman” (page 13)
Priestess – Chika – Agbala Oracle – consultation.
Unoka’s death – bad “chi” – buried in the forest
What did he die of? Chapters 1,2 3 THE SECOND COMING:
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the center cannot hold
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity William Butler Yeats Chinua Achebe: “God hear !!! God Keep!!! – ejaculatory prayer – David, Peter, Paul.
Importance of names in Africa: “Abolade”
Country of Origin: Nigeria
Nigeria was a former British Colony
Nigeria became independent from Britain in 1960
Achebe from the eastern part of Nigeria (Ogidi)
Ethnic Origin: Igbo or Ibo
Major Nigerian Ethnic groups: Hausa, Yoruba, and Ibo
Population of Nigeria: 140 Million – growing
Similarities with the Yoruba: Chinua Achebe - Background MACBETH Accursed be that tongue that tells me so, For it hath cow'd my better part of man! And be these juggling fiends no more believed, That palter with us in a double sense; That keep the word of promise to our ear, And break it to our hope. I'll not fight with thee. MACDUFF Then yield thee, coward, And live to be the show and gaze o' the time: We'll have thee, as our rarer monsters are, Painted on a pole, and underwrit, 'Here may you see the tyrant.' MACBETH I will not yield, To kiss the ground before young Malcolm's feet, And to be baited with the rabble's curse. Though Birnam wood be come to Dunsinane, And thou opposed, being of no woman born, Yet I will try the last. Before my body I throw my warlike shield. Lay on, Macduff, And damn'd be him that first cries, 'Hold, enough!' Exeunt, fighting. Alarums Why should I play the Roman fool, and die On mine own sword? whiles I see lives, the gashes Do better upon them. Enter MACDUFF
MACDUFF Turn, hell-hound, turn! MACBETH Of all men else I have avoided thee: But get thee back; my soul is too much charged With blood of thine already. MACDUFF I have no words: My voice is in my sword: thou bloodier villain Than terms can give thee out! They fight
MACBETH Thou losest labour: As easy mayst thou the intrenchant air With thy keen sword impress as make me bleed: Let fall thy blade on vulnerable crests; I bear a charmed life, which must not yield, To one of woman born. MACDUFF Despair thy charm; And let the angel whom thou still hast served Tell thee, Macduff was from his mother's womb Untimely ripp'd. Shakespeare - Macbeth
Full transcript