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Bataan Death March

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by

Lacey Riggans

on 5 December 2014

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Transcript of Bataan Death March

March to Hell
Background
Who: American and Filipino prisoners that were captured by the Japanese. There were between 70-80,000 prisoners, mostly Filipinos.

What: In the picture they are arriving at Camp O'Donnell at the end of the march.

When: It started around noon on April 9, 1942. It went on for around 6 days and ended on April 15, 1942.

Where: They started in Mariveles (the southern end of the Bataan Peninsula). Prisoners were marched 55 miles from Mariveles to San Fernando. Then traveled by train to Capas. From Capas they marched the last 8 miles to Camp O'Donnell.

Why/How: Hours after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, they also struck American-held airbases in the Philippines. They followed the attack with a ground invasion. While the Japanese headed toward the capital (Manila), American and Filipino troops retreated to the Bataan Peninsula. The soldiers were quickly cut off from food and supplies by the Japanese. Slowly they used up all their supplies by decreasing rations little by little. Months in the jungle barely surviving on what little they had, the soldiers decided to surrender.

The Japanese would often beat and just be plain cruel to them. Many did not survive the march because of all the harsh conditions. I believe the only reason the Japanese did this is to feel superior. It was an entirely unnecessary and inhuman thing to do.

Summary of the poem

The poem mostly describes the brutality of the war, how the conditions were and the remembrance of the march.. It starts of describing the bombing and ground invasion, but then when it get to "they feel a club and blade of steel" it is when they are being beaten during the march.
Citations
Rosenberg, Jennifer. "What Was the Bataan Death March in World War II?" About. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Dec. 2014.
"Bataan Death March Begins." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 01 Dec. 2014.
"Defenders of the Philippine." Poetry. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Dec. 2014.
Bataan Death March-- WWII
Lacey Riggans
CANNONS ROAR, WE FIGHT FOR TIME,
WE LOOK FOR SHIPS, BUT SEE NO SIGN.
THE WOUNDED BLEED, LIFE SLIPS AWAY
THESE BRAVE YOUNG MEN, ARE HERE TO STAY

THE FLAG IS DOWN, OUR EYES HAVE TEARS,
THE GENERAL SIGNS, SILENCE HE HEARS.
WE MOVE ACROSS, THE LAND THAT FELL,
AND START OUR MARCH, OUR MARCH THROUGH HELL.

NOW DEATH AWAITS, ALONG THE WAY,
OUR ONLY HOPE, OUR GOD WE PRAY.
THE WEAK AND SICK, WILL SOON BE STILL,
THEY FEEL A CLUB AND A BLADE OF STEEL.


WE MUST GO ON, THERE IS NO SLEEP,
THE DEAD NOW STILL, NO MORE THEY WEEP.
WE LIVE, WE PRAY FOR THOSE THAT FELL,
NO MORE THEY PAIN, THEY’VE SEEN THEIR HELL.

ACCEPT THEM LORD, WITH ALL YOUR LVOE,
AND PRAY FOR US, FROM FAR ABOVE.
THESE SCARS WE BARE, WILL NEVER FADE.
WE’LL NOT FORGET THE PRICE THEY PAID.

For my friend Capt. Kermit Lay, U.S. Army (survivor) Awarded
Silver Star Bronze Star (2) Purple Heart (2)

Poem by Frank R. Tiscareno, VFW
BATAAN By Frank Tiscareno
Full transcript