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Suzanne Aubert

Inspiring Men and Women Assignment
by

Georgia Chapple

on 25 September 2012

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Transcript of Suzanne Aubert

Suzanne Aubert Suzanne was born on the 19th of June, 1835 in St Symphorien-de-Lay, France. She grew up in a Catholic environment: Suzanne's Mother, Clarice worked for Church welfare organizations and her Father, Louis was a type of church usher. Suzanne's Family Suzanne's parents had organized for her to be married to a family friends son. When she grew up though, she refused to do it, because she didn't think it was right. Her mother took her to the priest, who told Suzanne that she had made the right decision, and that God had other plans for her, and it was just what she needed to hear. Missionary Calling Suzanne arrived in NZ in 1860, and joined the English speaking Sisters of Mercy. She then opened the Congregation of the Holy Family In 1862 to educate Maori Children. She was now called Sister Mary Joseph, and the Maori people called her "Meri".
Suzanne had a mentor who taught her everything about Maori culture and language, called Hoki, also known as Peata. She had been baptized by Bishop Pompallier in 1840 just before the Singing of the Treaty of Waitangi, and became a sister of the Holy Family Life In NZ When Suzanne was about two years old, she fell through thin ice on a pond into the icy water, and was temporarily blind and crippled. Because of this and her disabled brothers death as a baby, she began to empathise with those with disabilities.Suzanne later regained use of her limbs but was left with a cast in one eye. She went to boarding school under the care of the Benedictine nuns of La Rochette and made up lost ground caused by her disability. She learnt music, fine arts, needlework, languages and literature. Bibliography http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzanne_Aubert
http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/biographies/2a18/1
http://www.catholic.org.nz/our-story/dsp-default.cfm?loadref=47
http://www.compassion.org.nz/aubert/aubert.htm Leaving for New Zealand In 1859 Bishop Pompallier, came to Lyon to recruit people for a diocese in Auckland, and Suzanne wanted to go. At the age of 19, Suzanne had made up her mind that she wanted to do missionary work in New Zealand. Despite her parents telling her not to, she left with Bishop Pompalleir anyway in 1860 with 23 other missionaries, telling her parents she'd gone to a funeral. The Aubert family's contacts with the Marist in Lyon and many other missionary movements inspired her to go and do missionary work herself. By Georgia Chapple She then opened the Congregation of the Holy Family In 1862 to educate Maori Children. She was now called Sister Mary Joseph, and the Maori people called her "Meri".
Suzanne had a mentor who taught her everything about Maori culture and language, called Hoki, also known as Peata. She had been baptized by Bishop Pompallier in 1840 just before the Singing of the Treaty of Waitangi, and became a sister of the Holy Family Suzanne had a mentor who taught her everything about Maori culture and language, called Hoki, also known as Peata. She had been baptized by Bishop Pompallier in 1840 just before the Singing of the Treaty of Waitangi, and became a sister of the Holy Family 1871-1883:Hawks Bay Now 35 years old, Suzanne
went to Hawks Bay, where
she became well kown for
her good nursing skills. 1883-1899: Hiruharama-Jerusalem Suzanne was asked to lead a
branch of the Marist Third
Order Regular of Mary. As well as running this school, she and the other sisters she was working with opened up an orphanage. This was how the Sisters of Compassion order began. 1899-1913:Wellington Suzanne and two other
sisters went to Wellington. There they set up a soup kitchen that still runs today as well as a childrens creche and the impressive Home Of Compassion Suzanne Aubert
"Home of Compassion" 1920 - 1926: Wellington Suzanne wanted to ensure security for the sisters and good hospital treatment and nursing for the poor of NZs post-war depression. She arranged all of this to happen. On the 1st of October 1926, aged 91, Suzanne Aubert died. Crowds gatherd to come to pay their respects. Her funeral was said to be the greatest funeral of any NZ women recorded. Aubert inspires me because she knew what God had planned out for her and just went for it, leaving him completly in control, and that takes a lot of courage. Also the way she saw what needed to be done in the places she went, and she just did them. ‘Let us always be ready to share the pains, the cares, the sorrows of others.’
-Suzanne Aubert Suzanne and her students
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