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Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

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Sara Bonito

on 16 April 2015

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Transcript of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

Evidence
Romeo and Juliet
Evidence
Shakespeare's
Romeo and Juliet

by Sara Bonito
Romeo and Juliet
Characters:

Capulets:
Juliet Capulet
Lord Capulet
Lady Capulet
Tybalt

Montagues:
Lord Montague
Lady Montague
Romeo Montague

Others:
Mercutio
Benvolio
Friar Laurence
Rosaline
Paris
Nurse
Romeo and Juliet meet at a party and fall in love with each other. But they quickly find out that their families are enemies. They marry each other in secret, but Juliet is forced to marry someone else, a young man named Paris, a few days later after she married Romeo. To avoid marrying Paris, Juliet drinks a potion that makes her appear dead for 24 hours, so when her Nurse came to wake her up, they would think that Juliet died. Someone was supposed to deliver a letter to Romeo saying that when Juliet woke up, Romeo was supposed to be there to take Juliet and flee, but Romeo never got the letter, so he thought that Juliet had died. On his way to visit Juliet's "dead body," Romeo bought a poison so he could kill himself. He saw Juliet and gave her one last kiss, then drank the poison. Juliet woke up a few minutes later only to find Romeo dead, so she stabs herself with Romeo's dagger and falls dead. When the Capulets (Juliet's family) and the Montagues (Romeo's family) find them both dead, they end the war in sorrow of the dead of their children.
Shakespeare's
Romeo and Juliet
by Sara Bonito
Topic:

The topic is focusing on the Nurse and her importance and value in
Romeo and Juliet
.
11/19/14
Opinion:

The Nurse is the most valued character in Shakespeare's
Romeo and Juliet
because of her relationship with Juliet.
Act 1, Scene 3: A room in Capulet's house.


Enter LADY CAPULET and Nurse

LADY CAPULET:
Nurse, where's my daughter? call her forth to me.

JULIET:
How now! who calls?

NURSE:
Your mother.

JULIET:
Madam, I am here.
What is your will?
In Act 1, Scene 5, Lady Capulet asks the Nurse to call her daughter, Juliet. When Juliet arrives, she asks who calls her, and when the Nurse declares that her mother called, Juliet says "Madam, I am here. What is your will?" Here, Juliet addresses her own mother as "madam," but in scene 5, Juliet gives the Nurse orders to go find out who that man is. She speaks differently with the Nurse and Juliet doesn't address the Nurse with "madam," like she does to Lady Capulet.
JULIET: Act 1, Scene 5
Come hither, nurse. What is yond gentleman?

NURSE:
The son and heir of old Tiberio.

JULIET:
What's he that now is going out of door?

NURSE:
Marry, that, I think, be young Petrucio.

JULIET:
What's he that follows there, that would not dance?

NURSE:
I know not.

JULIET:
Go ask his name: if he be married.
My grave is like to be my wedding bed.
In Act 1, Scene 5: A hall in Capulet's house, Romeo and Juliet first meet. The Nurse introduces who they are by telling Juliet that Romeo is a Montague. Juliet tells her Nurse that her only hate is now her only love. She talks to the Nurse about Romeo but doesn't mention him when her parents are nearby.
ROMEO:
Act 2, Scene 4
Nurse, commend me to thy lady and mistress. I protest unto thee--

NURSE:
Good heart, and, i' faith, I will tell her as much:
Lord, Lord, she will be a joyful woman.

ROMEO:
What wilt thou tell her, nurse? thou dost not mark me.

NURSE:
I will tell her, sir, that you do protest; which, as
I take it, is a gentlemanlike offer.

ROMEO:
Bid her devise
Some means to come to shrift this afternoon;
And there she shall at Friar Laurence' cell
Be shrived and married. Here is for thy pains.
NURSE:
No truly sir; not a penny.

ROMEO:
Go to; I say you shall.

NURSE:
This afternoon, sir? well, she shall be there.
ROMEO: Act 1, Scene 5
What is her mother?
NURSE:
Marry, bachelor,
Her mother is the lady of the house,
And a good lady, and a wise and virtuous
I nursed her daughter, that you talk'd withal;
I tell you, he that can lay hold of her
Shall have the chinks.
ROMEO:
Is she a Capulet?
O dear account! my life is my foe's debt.
JULIET: Act 1, Scene 5
Come hither, nurse. What is yond gentleman?
NURSE:
The son and heir of old Tiberio.
JULIET:
What's he that now is going out of door?
NURSE:
Marry, that, I think, be young Petrucio.
JULIET:
What's he that follows there, that would not dance?
Nurse
I know not.
JULIET:
Go ask his name: if he be married.
My grave is like to be my wedding bed.
NURSE:
His name is Romeo, and a Montague;
The only son of your great enemy.
JULIET:
My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me,
That I must love a loathed enemy.
CAPULET: Act 4, Scene 2
We shall be much unfurnished for this time.
What, is my daughter gone to Friar Laurence?
NURSE:
Ay, forsooth.
CAPULET:
Well, he may chance to do some good on her:
A peevish self-will'd harlotry it is.
NURSE:
See where she comes from shrift with merry look.
Enter JULIET

CAPULET:
How now, my headstrong! where have you been gadding?
JULIET:
Where I have learn'd me to repent the sin
Of disobedient opposition
To you and your behests, and am enjoin'd
By holy Laurence to fall prostrate here,
And beg your pardon: pardon, I beseech you!
Henceforward I am ever ruled by you.
CAPULET:
Send for the county; go tell him of this:
I'll have this knot knit up to-morrow morning.
JULIET:
I met the youthful lord at Laurence' cell;
And gave him what becomed love I might,
Not step o'er the bounds of modesty.
Evidence
In Act 2, Scene 4: A Street, the Nurse asks Romeo if he arranged the wedding, and he tells her yes. The Nurse goes to tell Juliet the good news.
Here, the Nurse asks as "Shakespeare's pawn to guide events." Juliet feels safe letting the Nurse know about the wedding but she doesn't feel safe letting her mother or father know about the wedding. This shows that Juliet and her Nurse have a strong relationship and bond together, and they also share a lot of information and "gossip" together, while Juliet makes no attempt to tell Lady Capulet and Capulet about her affairs with Romeo.
In Act 2, Scene 5, Juliet asks the Nurse what Romeo said about the wedding. The Nurse tells Juliet that Romeo arranged a wedding, and she should go to "Friar Laurence' cell," to a priest who will help get Romeo and Juliet married because he believes that the marriage will help end the feud between their families.

Juliet doesn't mind talking to the Nurse about Romeo and her marriage, and she makes the Nurse ask Romeo if the marriage is ready, and such. But in Act 4, Scene 2, Juliet and the Nurse are talking to Juliet's father, Capulet, and they don't mention Romeo to Capulet, so this supports the claim that the Nurse and Juliet have a strong bond.
CAPULET: Act 4, Scene 2
Go, be gone.
Exit Second Servant
We shall be much unfurnished for this time.
What, is my daughter gone to Friar Laurence?
NURSE:
Ay, forsooth.
CAPULET:
Well, he may chance to do some good on her:
A peevish self-will'd harlotry it is.
Nurse
See where she comes from shrift with merry look.
Enter JULIET

CAPULET:
How now, my headstrong! where have you been gadding?
JULIET:
Where I have learn'd me to repent the sin
Of disobedient opposition
To you and your behests, and am enjoin'd
By holy Laurence to fall prostrate here,
And beg your pardon: pardon, I beseech you!
Henceforward I am ever ruled by you.
JULIET: Act 2, Scene 5
Here's such a coil! come, what says Romeo?

NURSE:
Have you got leave to go to shrift to-day?

JULIET:
I have.

NURSE:
Then hie you hence to Friar Laurence' cell;
There stays a husband to make you a wife:
Now comes the wanton blood up in your cheeks,
They'll be in scarlet straight at any news.
Hie you to church; I must another way,
To fetch a ladder, by the which your love
Must climb a bird's nest soon when it is dark:
I am the drudge and toil in your delight,
But you shall bear the burden soon at night.
Go; I'll to dinner: hie you to the cell.

JULIET:
Hie to high fortune! Honest nurse, farewell.


Exeunt

In conclusion, the Nurse can be described as Shakespeare's "pawn to guide events." If the Nurse did not exist in
Romeo and Juliet
, then a lot of events would not have occurred. For instance, Romeo and Juliet would have not known each other belonged to enemy families, because in Act 1, Scene 5, the two lovers first meet each other, and the Nurse explains to Romeo that Juliet is a Capulet, and the Nurse tells Juliet that Romeo belongs to the Montague family.
Play Summary
Topic Summary
The Nurse also has a very strong relationship with Juliet. The Nurse is more like a mother to Juliet than Lady Capulet, who is Juliet's actual mother. Juliet shares everything with the Nurse, but keeps secrets from her own parents. The Nurse is responsible for making Romeo and Juliet know each other's name and family. The Nurse is also responsible for passing the wedding arrangements from Romeo to Juliet so each know when and where they should go for the marriage. The Nurse makes the play run smoothly is a very valuable character.
But what do you think would happen in the Nurse did not exist?
Shakespeare Biography
Shakespeare was a poet and an amazing playwright.
My opinion on Shakespeare is that he was very talented and I believe he was the first person to turn writing into plays. Shakespeare was able to create different genres of playwright ranging from tragedy, to comedy, and love. William Shakespeare was the first successful person to write poetry and create plays. He made the English language known in London and was the first official English poet and playwright.
William Shakespeare Timeline
April 23, 1564 - Shakespeare is born at Stratford-upon-Avon. (Researches believe this is the day Shakespeare was born, but they can't be sure.)
1569 - Shakespeare enters King's New School. (The exact date is not known for when Shakespeare started school.)
November 28, 1582 - At 18 years old, Shakespeare marries Anne Hathaway at 26 years old.
May 26, 1583 - Susanna, William Shakespeare's first child, is born and baptized.
1585 - Anne Hathaway gives birth to twins. Daughter Judith and son Hamnet.
1590 - William Shakespeare writes his first play Henry VI, Part One, also around this time, Shakespeare leaves Stratford to begin work as an actor and playwright in London.
1592 - Playwright Robert Greens "pens a scathing critique" of Shakespeare and calls him an "upstart crow." Thanks to this "diatribe," we now know that Shakespeare has already became an enough successful playwright by 1592 to make others jealous.
January 1593 - A plague closes theaters, and Shakespeare uses that time to write poetry.
April 1593 - William Shakespeare publishes "Venus and Adonis," his first long published poem. "Venus and Adonis" is dedicated to Henry Wriothesley, his patron, the Earl Southampton.
1594 - The theaters reopen to the public and over the next five years, William Shakespeare's troupe, "the Chamberlain's Men," and it becomes one of the most "popular acting groups in London."
May 1594 - William Shakespeare publishes "The Rape of Lucrece," which is also dedicated to the Earl Southampton.
August 11, 1596 - William Shakespeare and Anne Hathaway's only son, Hamnet, dies of an unknown cause.
May 1597 - William is wealthy now, and he buys "New Place," the second-largest house in Stratford-upon-Avon.
1598 - William Shakespeare's work is praised by writer Francis Meres, who publishes a "glowing review" of Shakespeare's work. We know that by this time, William Shakespeare was a well-known playwright with at least a dozen plays written.
1599 - The globe theather is built by "the Chamberlain's Men."
1601 - Shakespare's father dies and so does his patron, Earl Southampton. "Shakespeare's plays over the next few years take a dark, brooding tone."
March 24, 1603 - Queen Elizabeth I dies and King James takes the throne. "The Chamberlain's Men" change their name to "the King's Men," and perform for King James many times.
1608 - "The King's Men" start performing in Blackfriar's theater. The "the gloomy tone" Shakespeare took in his plays changed a bit to a "lighter tone."
1609 - A collection of William Shakespeare's sonnets (154 sonnets) are printed by publisher Thomas Thorpe.
1611 - Shakespeare returns to Stratford-upon-Avon where his wife and married daughters live.
1613 - Shakespeare composes his final plays, and the Globe theater catches on fire during a performance of
Henry VIII
and "burns to the ground."
March 25, 1616 - Shakespeare calls his laywer and they revise his will.
April 23, 1616 - William Shakespeare dies.
Apr 25, 1616 - William Shakespeare is buried in "
Holy Trinity Church
" in Startford-upon-Avon, which is the same church where Shakespeare was baptized.
1623 - William Shakespeare's former colleagues in "
the King's men,
" Henry Condell and John Heminge, collect 36 of Shakespeare's plays and publish them together. The collection of William Shakespeare's 36 plays is in a volume which is now knows as "
the First Folio
."
Cites
Shmoop Editorial Team. "William Shakespeare Timeline of Important Dates." 11 Nov. 2008. Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 15 Nov. 2014. <http://www.shmoop.com/william-shakespeare/timeline.html>
"Wiliam Shakespeare Biography." 2014. The Biograhpy.com website. 14 Nov. 2014 <http://www.biography.com/people/william-shakespeare-9480323#synopsis>
Hylton, Jeremy. "The Complete Works of William Shakespeare." 1993. The Tech. 12 Nov. 2014 <http://shakespeare.mit.edu/romeo_juliet/index.html>
"Romeo and Juliet First Meeting: "Love Pop." 2014. Flocabulary. 14 Nov. 2014 <https://www.flocabulary.com/romeo-and-juliet-first-meeting/>
Gill, Jeff. "Romeo & Juliet: Juliet." Towson University. 10 Nov. 2014 <http://pages.towson.edu/quick/romeoandjuliet/juliet.htm#Paragraph 1>
Creel, Angie. "Romeo and Juliet: The Nurse." Towson University. 11 Nov. 2014 <http://pages.towson.edu/quick/romeoandjuliet/nurse.htm>
Evidence
ROMEO: Act 2, Scene 2
O blessed, blessed night! I am afeard.
Being in night, all this is but a dream,
Too flattering-sweet to be substantial.
Re-enter JULIET, above

JULIET:
Three words, dear Romeo, and good night indeed.
If that thy bent of love be honourable,
Thy purpose marriage, send me word to-morrow,
By one that I'll procure to come to thee,
Where and what time thou wilt perform the rite;
And all my fortunes at thy foot I'll lay
And follow thee my lord throughout the world.
NURSE:
[Within] Madam!
The people at Shmoop University and Towson University both know that Romeo and Juliet were the probably "the most famous pair of lovers in Western literature," says Shmoop. And the Nurse helps guide them. Like the students at Towson University said, "The Nurse acts as Shakespeare's pawn to guide events."

In Act 2, Scene 2 (The famous balcony scene), Romeo and Juliet are talking together when the Nurse interrupts.

The Nurse was watching out for Juliet, and the Nurse was calling for her when she was talking to Romeo. What I can tell from this scene is that the Nurse was calling Juliet so she could come inside. The way this connects to the topic and opinion is that the Nurse played a role in the famous balcony scene, where Romeo and Juliet were talking a lot together. She was valuable in that scene because she stopped Romeo and Juliet from talking into the night and after the sunrise. If they kept on talking, one of Juliet's parents would have spotted her. The Nurse plays a very important role in the actions of Romeo and Juliet.
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Romeo and Juliet Questions." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. 11 Nov. 2014 <http://www.shmoop.com/romeo-and-juliet/questions.html>
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Romeo and Juliet Questions." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. 11 Nov. 2014 <http://www.shmoop.com/romeo-and-juliet/questions.html>
Gill, Jeff. "Romeo & Juliet: Juliet." Towson University. 10 Nov. 2014 <http://pages.towson.edu/quick/romeoandjuliet/juliet.htm#Paragraph 1>
Full transcript