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4 Waves of Immigration to the U.S.

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by

Frank McCormick

on 28 March 2016

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Transcript of 4 Waves of Immigration to the U.S.

Germany
England
Ireland
Italy
West Africa
China
Eastern Europe
Mexico
Caribbean
The Four Waves of Immigration to America
Wave #1: 1609-1775
Wave #2: 1820-1870
Wave #3: 1881-1920
Wave #4: 1965- Present
Push: Emigrated from Mexico due to poverty


Push: Religious intolerance and lack of freedom in England

Pull: New world with unlimited possibilities
Europe (Primarily English)
Africa (forced migration-slaves)
New England
Ellis Island,
New York
Massive Jewish migrations from Russia (Antisemitism and Pogroms)
Why they came?
Recap: Potato Famine
The Irish were very religious: Roman Catholic. They were persecuted by the English because of their faith.
Most Poles and Italians were Catholic.
Pulled to the U.S. because of the availability of jobs out West- lure of gold and railway jobs (transcontinental railroad)
Mostly single men came hoping to make money and send it back to their families. Many of them ended up staying.
Many Americans viewed the Chinese as bizarre and "too foreign".
Poor economy in Germany, overcrowded cities, over-productive farms, a failed revolution, and the availability of cheap farmland in the U.S.
Primarily from Southern and Eastern Europe (Italy, Russia, and Poland)
Transit across Atlantic became easier and cheaper... That and the need for cheap laborers for factories was a big pull.
Primarily Protestant
Primarily Catholic
Latin America: Primarily Mexico
Pull: Availability of jobs in America that require no education/technical training
San Francisco
The Irish
The Chinese
The German
Full transcript