Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Counseling Jewish Americans

No description
by

Katherine Hoarn

on 15 November 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Counseling Jewish Americans

Jewish Americans By: Adria Barnes
Daniel Fioramonti
Kayla Priefer
Kimberly Young Counseling Being Jewish: An Ethnic Minority Category According to Fouad and Brown (2000), an ethnic group may be defined as:
“A group of people who live, or once lived, in close proximity to one another and, as a consequence, share ways of thinking, feeling and behaving; and learning from similar life circumstances over shared generations.” Fouad, N. A., & Brown, M. T. (2000). Role of race and social class in development: Implications for counseling psychology. In S. W. Brown and R. W. Lent (Eds.),Handbook of counseling psychology (3rd ed.) (pp. 379–408). NY: Wiley and Sons (as cited in Schlosser, 2006).
Defining Jewishness Judaism: “A culture, a religion, an ethnicity, and a set of traditions that is embedded in Jewish people’s expectations, believe systems, and family dynamics.” (Schlosser, 2006)
“There are many ways to be Jewish; there are many ways to express one’s Jewish identity and degrees of adherence to Jewish law. Furthermore, there is no uniform way to be Jewish.” (Schlosser, 2006) Schlosser, L. (2006). Affirmative Psychotherapy for Jewish Americans. American Psychological Association, 43(4), 424-435. doi:10.1037/0033-3204.43.4.424 Inter-Group Variations Jews vary in:
cultural and ethnic background
adherence to religious orthodoxy
practice of cultural customs and observance of holidays Friedman, M. L., Friedlander, M. L., & Blustein, D. L. (2005). Toward an understanding of Jewish identity: A phenomenological study. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 52, 77–83 (as cited in Schlosser, 2006).
Three Main Groups of Individuals who Self-Identify as Jews: Those of Jewish descent who practice Judaism to some degree Those of Jewish descent who do not practice Judaism (Secular/Cultural Jews) Converts to the religion of Judaism Sue, D. & Sue, D. (2008). Counseling Jewish Americans. Counseling the Culturally Diverse Theory and Practice (pp. 415-422). New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Regional Genealogy Langman (1999) identifies three main lineage groups:

Ashkenazim – Eastern Europe (Most prominent in the popular imagination; also the largest group numerically)
Sephardim – Spain or Portugal
Mizrachim – Northern Africa or Western Asia
Other subgroups include Greek Jews and Italian Jews Langman, P. F. (1999). Jewish issues in multiculturalism: A handbook for educators and clinicians. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson Inc. (as cited in Schlosser, 2006). Jewish Population by Numbers Worldwide
Estimated between 12 and 17 million

United States
2010 US Census: 6,543,820
Percent of Population: 2.1%
Jewish Population in Florida: 613,235
Percent of Population: 3.3% Schlosser, L. (2006). Affirmative Psychotherapy for Jewish Americans. American Psychological Association, 43(4), 424-435. doi:10.1037/0033-3204.43.4.424

U.S. Census Bureau. (2012a). 2012 Census: Christian Church Adherents, 2000, and Jewish Population, 2010—States. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0077.pdf Jewish Presence at Florida State University Enrollment:
Undergraduate: 2,964
Graduate: 837
9% of student population

Number of Jewish Studies courses: 30

The university has a study program in Israel.

FSU rated #5 according to “Hillel's Top 10 Jewish Schools” in America. Hillel. (2006, February 16). Hillel's top 10 Jewish schools. Retrieved from www.hillel.org

Hillel. (2012). Florida State University campus information. Retrieved from http://www.hillel.org/HillelApps/JLOC/Campus.aspx?AgencyId=17394 Largest urban centers include New York City, Miami, and Los Angeles.More generally, the Jewish population is concentrated in the Northwest and along the East Coast, in California, and in Chicago. Estimated Jewish Population in the United States by County, 2011. (2011). [Visual map]. Jewish Data Bank. Retrieved from http://www.jewishdatabank.org/Archive/N-JewishMapUS_2011_Estimated_Jewish_Persons_by_County.pdf Many American Jews feel bi-cultural, both American and Jewish.
Internal cultural self-concept is not necessarily a static reality and can evolve over the lifespan. Friedman, M. L., Friedlander, M. L., & Blustein, D. L. (2005). Toward an understanding of Jewish identity: A phenomenological study. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 52, 77–83 (as cited in Schlosser, 2006). Bi-Cultural Identification Changes in Population Dramatic decline in self-described religious affiliation of American Jews (Jews who identify themselves as associated with a religious community)
1990: 3.14 Million
2001: 2.84 Million
2008: 2.68 Million
Recent Jewish population fluctuation:
1990: 5.5 Million
2000: 5.2 Million
2011: 6.5 Million U.S. Census Bureau. (2012b). 2012 Census: Self-Described Religious Identification of Adult Population: 1990, 2001, and 2008. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0075.pdf
Sheskin, I. & Dashefsky, A. (2011). Jewish population in the United States, 2011. I. Sheskin, A. Dashefsky, & S. DellaPergola (Eds.). Retrieved from http://www.jewishdatabank.org/Reports/Jewish_Population_in_the_United_States_2011.pdf Religious and Cultural Traditions  Major Denominations:
Hasidic
Orthodox
Conservative
Reconstructionist
Reform Central Religious Rituals The Sabbath (Shabbat)
Social visits & time for quiet reflection
From sunset Friday to late Saturday
For more traditional Jews: religious services, no electricity or driving
Yom Kippur
Synagogue services, a day of fasting & atonement Common Core Values The importance of life and freedom
Ecological sensitivity
Tikkun Olam (“to heal the world”) – often leads to a focus on social justice and peace
The importance of family life
Tradition
Education Schlosser, L. (2006). Affirmative Psychotherapy for Jewish Americans. American Psychological Association, 43(4), 424-435. doi:10.1037/0033-3204.43.4.424 Hate Crimes Against
Jewish Americans FBI Statistics
In 2010, 6,628 hate crimes were reported
1,409 or 20% of those crimes were inspired by religious biasOf those crimes, 65.4% were anti-Jewish Hate crime statistics: Incidents and offenses. (2010). Retrieved from http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/hate-crime/2010/narratives/hate-crime-2010-incidents-and-offenses Religious bias motivation for hate crimes Hate crime statistics: Incidents and offenses. (2010). Retrieved from http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/hate-crime/2010/narratives/hate-crime-2010-incidents-and-offenses In an annual Audit by The Anti-Defamation League, the number of Anti-Semitic Incidents recorded in the United States in 2011, fell to 1,080, representing a 13% decrease 2011 audit of anti-semitic incidents overview: About the 2011 audit. (2012, October 29). Retrieved from http://www.adl.org/main_Anti_Semitism_Domestic/2011-Audit-of-Anti-Semitic-Incidents 2011 Audit of Anti-Semitic Incidents (STOP AT 1:22) Anti-Semitism in Higher Education Zeveloff, N. (2012, March 13). Coming up empty on title vi. Retrieved from http://www.jewishresearch.org/quad/12-11/Alone%20on%20the%20Quad.pdf Anti-Semitic Rhetoric Zeveloff, N. (2012, March 13). Coming up empty on title vi. Retrieved from http://www.jewishresearch.org/quad/12-11/Alone%20on%20the%20Quad.pdf Discrimination Based on Religion Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act
Prohibits discrimination based on race, color, or natural origin.
October 2010, Secretary of Education issued a letter stating that Title VI would cover religious groups henceforth.

Jewish students yet to succeed in overcoming anti-Semitic activity on college campuses. Zeveloff, N. (2012, March 13). Coming up empty on title vi. Retrieved from http://www.jewishresearch.org/quad/12-11/Alone%20on%20the%20Quad.pdf Anti-Semitism Within the Counseling Profession Scheduling of conferences and presentations during Jewish holidays
The NBCC scheduled the administration of the National Counseling exam during Yom Kippur
63% of a sample of prominent texts on multicultural counseling failed to list terms including “Jew”, “Judaism”, or “anti-Semitism,” among others Kiselica, M. S. (2003). Anti-Semitism and Insensitivity Towards Jews by the Counseling Profession: A Gentile's View on the Problem and His Hope for Reconciliation-- A Response to Weinrach (2002). Journal Of Counseling & Development, 81(4), 426-440.

Weinrach, S. G. (2002). The Counseling Profession's Relationship to Jews and the Issues That Concern Them: More Than a Case of Selective Awareness. Journal Of Counseling & Development, 80(3), 300. Advocacy for
Jewish Americans AJC – Global Jewish Advocacy
Focuses on domestic as well as international issues
Work with Congress, foreign governments and religious groups
Promotes religious liberty, equality in education, civil liberties and national security and human rights abuses AJC global jewish advocacy: Advocacy. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.ajc.org/site/c.ijITI2PHKoG/b.838567/k.DB07/Advocacy.htm AJWS
Global Hunger
Debt Relief
Foreign Assistance
Gender Equality
Get Involved
Donate
Fundraise
Events Counseling Jewish Americans As a counselor, it is important to be aware of experiences of discrimination and harassment
68% account for the most hate crimes
Become aware of biases and assumptions about Jewish Americans
Greedy, stingy, dark skin, curly black hair
Assimilation into the majority culture
Christian Privilege Issues in Counseling Jewish Americans Jewish Americans are more likely to seek mental health services than Protestants, Catholics, and those with “no religion”. (Yeung & Greenwald, 1992)
Non-Orthodox Jews have favorable attitudes towards psychotherapy whereas Orthodox and Hasidic Jews associate it with insanity & believe it could negatively impact marriage prospects (Wikler, 1986) Before Counseling The therapist should understand the client’s:
adherence to the practice of Judaism
relationship with the dominant culture
relationship to other Jews

Determine to what degree their Jewish identity is part of the reason for them coming to therapy Types of Therapy Small amount of research on interventions for Jewish Americans
Eisenberg & Milevsky (2012) Spiritually oriented treatment with Jewish clients
Spirituality oriented cognitive-behavioral therapy is beneficial
Psychotherapy
Most Jewish Americans value insight, introspection, & intellectual discussion OHEL Mental Health Professionals Common Reasons for Coming to Therapy Jewish identity issues
Body image and gender identity
Child rearing practices among interfaith and non-interfaith couples
Interdenominational couples
Issues around converting to/from Judaism
Anti-Semitism-related experiences
Sexual orientation and religion Barriers Cultural Beliefs
To the Orthodox Jewish American, therapy may be seen as weakness or be admitting that their religion does not have the answers (Strean, 1994)
Orthodox Jewish Americans also fear that therapists will not respect their values (Sublette & Trappler, 2000). 2011 audit of anti-semitic incidents overview: About the 2011 audit. (2012, October 29). Retrieved from http://www.adl.org/main_Anti_Semitism_Domestic/2011-Audit-of-Anti-Semitic-Incidents
AJC global jewish advocacy: Advocacy. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.ajc.org/site/c.ijITI2PHKoG/b.838567/k.DB07/Advocacy.htm
American jewish world service: Get involved. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://ajws.org/get_involved/donate/personal_fundraising_pages.html
Anti-Defamation League. (2005). 2005 Survey of attitudes toward Jews in America. Retrieved on November 13, 2012, from http://www.adl.org/PresRele/ASUS_12/4680_12.htm.
Estimated Jewish Population in the United States by County, 2011. (2011). [Visual map]. Jewish Data Bank. Retrieved from http://www.jewishdatabank.org/Archive/N-JewishMapUS_2011_Estimated_Jewish_Persons_by_County.pdf
Fouad, N. A., & Brown, M. T. (2000). Role of race and social class in development: Implications for counseling psychology. In S. W. Brown and R. W. Lent (Eds.),Handbook of counseling psychology (3rd ed.) (pp. 379–408). NY: Wiley and Sons.
Friedman, M. L., Friedlander, M. L., & Blustein, D. L. (2005). Toward an understanding of Jewish identity: A phenomenological study. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 52, 77–83. http://psycnet.apa.org.proxy.lib.fsu.edu/journals/cou/52/1/77.pdf
Hillel. (2012). Florida State University campus information. Retrieved from http://www.hillel.org/HillelApps/JLOC/Campus.aspx?AgencyId=17394
Hillel. (2006, February 16). Hillel's top 10 Jewish schools. Retrieved from www.hillel.org
 Kiselica, M. S. (2003). Anti-Semitism and Insensitivity Towards Jews by the Counseling Profession: A Gentile's View on the Problem and His Hope for Reconciliation-- A Response to Weinrach (2002). Journal Of Counseling & Development, 81(4), 426-440.
Langman, P. F. (1999). Jewish issues in multiculturalism: A handbook for educators and clinicians. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson Inc.
Milevsky, A., & Eisenberg, M. (2012). Spiritually oriented treatment with jewish clients: Meditative prayer and religious texts. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 43(4), 336-340. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0028035
Schlosser, L. (2006). Affirmative Psychotherapy for Jewish Americans. American Psychological Association, 43(4), 424-435. doi:10.1037/0033-3204.43.4.424
Sheskin, I. & Dashefsky, A. (2011). Jewish population in the United States, 2011. I. Sheskin, A. Dashefsky, & S. DellaPergola (Eds.). Retrieved from http://www.jewishdatabank.org/Reports/Jewish_Population_in_the_United_States_2011.pdf
 Strean, H. (1994). Psychotherapy with the Orthodox Jew.Northvale, NJ; Aronson.
Sublette, E. and Trappler, B. (2000). Cultural Snesitivity training in mental health: treatment of Orthodox Jewish Psychiatric inpatients. The International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 46, 122-134.
Sue, D. & Sue, D. (2008). Counseling Jewish Americans. Counseling the Culturally Diverse Theory and Practice (pp. 415-422). New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
U.S. Census Bureau. (2012a). 2012 Census: Christian Church Adherents, 2000, and Jewish Population, 2010—States. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0077.pdf
U.S. Census Bureau. (2012b). 2012 Census: Self-Described Religious Identification of Adult Population:1990, 2001, and 2008. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0075.pdf
US government hate crime statistics: Incidents and offenses. (2010). Retrieved from http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/hate-crime/2010/narratives/hate-crime-2010-incidents-and-offenses
Weinberg, A. Institute For Jewish & Community Research, (2011). Alone on the quad: Understanding jewish student isolation on campus. Retrieved from website: http://www.jewishresearch.org/quad/12-11/Alone on the Quad.pdf
Weinrach, S. G. (2002). The Counseling Profession's Relationship to Jews and the Issues That Concern Them: More Than a Case of Selective Awareness. Journal Of Counseling & Development, 80(3), 300.
Wilker, M. (1986). Pathways to treatment: How Orthodox Jews enter therapy. Social Casework: The Journal of Contemporary Social Work, 67, 113–118.
Yeung, P. P., & Greenwald, S. (1992). Jewish Americans and mental health: Results of the NIMH Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 27, 292–297.
Zeveloff, N. (2012, March 13). Coming up empty on title vi. Retrieved from http://www.jewishresearch.org/v2/2012/Articles/March/title-vi.htm References
Full transcript