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Appositives

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by

Ally Spitery

on 15 November 2013

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Transcript of Appositives

Appositives
What is an appositive?
A noun or pronoun
Explains another noun or pronoun
Single world or descriptive phrase
Use: Appositive before the Noun
A known perfectionist
,
Haley Crimmins
is often credited for her flawless and detailed work.
Use: Appositive after the Noun
Maggie's racing
shoe
,
a lightweight electric blue spike
, was found hours after the race ended in a thick pile of mud.
Punctuation
Does the sentence contain all vital information if the appositive is taken out?
In red, see the
appositive.
In black, see the
noun
it describes.
Perfectionist describes Haley.
In red, see the
appositive.
In black, see the
noun
it describes.
Lightweight, electric blue, and spike describe Maggie's shoe
Yes
No
Use commas around the appositive (before and after).
No commas around the appositive.
Punctuation: when commas are not appropriate
The intriguing HHS class

Honors American Literature 10
is known for being more challenging than the basic tenth grade language arts course.
In red, see the
appositive.
In black, see the
noun
it describes.
We must know the appositive, HAL 10, in order to understand what is being compared to basic tenth grade language arts. The appositive is essential information, so NO COMMA IS USED.
The sentence is too general without the appositive.
The sentence has enough detail without the appositive.
Punctuation: when commas are appropriate
In red, see the
appositive.
In black, see the
noun
it describes.
Brooke Martin
, a charismatic tenth grader,
is recognized for her good work ethic and dedication at Holly High School.
This information is not essential to the sentence. The appositive can be taken out and the sentence is not over generalized, so COMMAS ARE USED.
An enthusiastic and captivating performer
,
Caylin Luebeck
has spent much of her time at the dance studio over the years pursuing her passion.
Appositive
Noun being explained
Rule: The appositive can come before or after the noun it describes.
When used first, the apposite often draws more attention to itself.
Do not use commas if the sentence meaning is clear only when the appositive is present.
When the appositive is 'extra' information, or not essential to the sentence, use commas. A dash is also acceptable.
Multiple Appositives in One Sentence
To make a more complex sentence, multiple appositives can be used in one sentence.
The natatorium, Emma's favorite place in the school, contains the swimming pool, an eight lane lap pool with a bone-chilling temperature.
Natatorium is described by the appositive "Emma's favorite place in the school"
Swimming pool is described by the appositive "an eight lane lap pool with a bone-chilling temperature"
By Allison Spitery
An appositive after the noun is an extra bit of information added. It can be seen as a 'side note'.
Check For Understanding
Identify the appositive and the noun it describes in the following sentence:
Legan, the dedicated Harry Potter fan, was overcome with joy when she heard the homecoming theme was Harry Potter.
Advance to check your answers
Legan, the dedicated Harry Potter fan, was overcome with joy when she heard the homecoming theme was Harry Potter.
Noun appositive describes
Appositive
"Dedicated Harry Potter fan" is the appositive because 'dedicated' and 'Harry Potter fan' explains the noun Legan.
Commas are added because the appositive is not essential to the meaning of the sentence.
Remember:
An appositive explains a noun or pronoun
Use commas around the appositive when it is 'excess' information
The appositive can come before or after the noun it describes.
Full transcript