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Social Studies New Teacher Training

Training Presentation for August 17, 2012
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Steve Simpson

on 17 August 2012

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Transcript of Social Studies New Teacher Training

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New Social Studies Teacher Training
Friday, August 17, 2012
8:00 am - 3:30 pm
TODAY'S PRESENTERS:
MANDY GENT - SOCIAL STUDIES INSTRUCTIONAL SPECIALIST

STEVE SIMPSON -
SOCIAL STUDIES INSTRUCTIONAL SPECIALIST

JULI WARNER - SOCIAL STUDIES DEPT. CHAIR, MHS
KATHY RIGGLE
SOCIAL STUDIES
COORDINATOR
TODAY'S OBJECTIVES:
Recognize your colleagues by name and teaching assignment after completing an "Inner Circle - Outer Circle" activity.
Identify the two parts of every TEKS and generalize and understand the purpose for "Unpacking the Standards"
Comprehend the organizational structure of the vertically aligned curriculum document and locate the documents on Curriculum Central.
State the importance of TAKS assessment and STAAR testing, and outline AISD testing procedures.
Analyze a primary source document as an example of "Doing History" and explore web resources.
Compare and contrast various techniques of effective vocabulary instruction.
Identify the variety of assessment options, from formal to informal.
Identify and categorize goals for the first day of school, then share ideas with a "Think, Pair, Share" activity.
Collaboratively create
a Unit overview plan
and a concept-based lesson plan for your course.
Raise unanswered questions during a final question & answer session.
Welcome to the Arlington ISD
Social Studies Department!
History is in a Name
Take a few minutes to complete the following information on an index card:
Your full name - first, middle, last
The history of your name (ex. who chose the name & why)
Something funny or memorable about the name (prefer a nickname, like or dislike it, people mispronounce it or confuse it with others, etc.)
Inner Circle - Outer Circle Activity
A teaching strategy that helps to facilitate student conversations, especially amongst reluctant English speakers (English Language Learners)
Students form two concentric circles facing one another, an inner circle and an outer circle
Students will participate in a short guided discussion or review with their partner (the individual standing across from them)
After a round of discussion, students in the outer circle rotate one position to the right while the inside circle remains in position (a signal is helpful to cue rotation)
With their new partner, students will participate in another guided discussion and/or review
With your index card in hand, form two circles: an inner circle and an outer circle
With your first partner, share the three pieces of information about your name
When you hear the signal, the outer circle will rotate one position to the right
Share with your new partner & repeat
Activity Debrief
Likes?
Dislikes?
Ideas for classroom application?
TEXAS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS (TEKS)
"Unpacking a Standard"
THE AISD SOCIAL STUDIES CURRICULUM DOCUMENT
Every curriculum document is divided into units, and units are divided by topic
The Scope & Sequence document provides an overview of units and topics by semester
More about Universal Generalizations, Essential Questions, and Conceptual Lenses in a few minutes . . .
The number of days to spend per topic is a recommendation, and should be adhered to whenever possible.
Each grade level curriculum document contains identical language explaining Celebrate Freedom Week and Constitution Day.
The curriculum document consists of five columns of information - each is important when determining how to teach your course.
COLUMN ONE:
TEKS / SEs WITH
SPECIFICATIONS
COLUMN TWO:
INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Curriculum writers determined which TEKS were relevant to the topic, and placed the TEKS into teachable order
Additionally, Focus Standards were identified for every Topic. These are standards that teachers determined were fundamental to the topic. They are a starting point for instructional decision making, but do not eliminate the need to teach all the standards.
Following the TEKS, specificity is included that helps interpret the TEKS and pinpoints essential knowledge.
COLUMN THREE:
RESOURCES
COLUMN FOUR:
ACADEMIC VOCABULARY
COLUMN FIVE:
ASSESSMENT
This column contains suggested activities and/or instructional strategies that could be incorporated into lessons
These suggestions may provide teachers with new ideas, may be incorporated into the classroom as written, modified to suit the needs of various groups of students, etc.
In many cases, more activities are listed than could possibly be taught within the allotted time frame; it may be necessary to pick and choose the best activity that matches the teacher's comfort level and best addresses your students' needs.
The Resources column provides references to materials that are available on every AISD campus, including adopted textbook materials
Additionally, hyperlinks are found throughout the documents that allow you to access rich and useful Internet content
The vocabulary column identifies a number of important vocabulary identifications and concepts, including:
Vertically aligned vocabulary is underlined
Mental Map items are accompanied by an asterisk (*)
Vocabulary strategies will be discussed later in the day
The Assessment column contains questions that would help assess a student's grasp of facts, concepts, and conceptual relationships (generalizations)
Types of assessment will also be discussed later in the day
In many instances, Social Studies skills TEKS have been paired with content TEKS
This reinforces the necessity of teaching social studies content through a variety of skills
Skills should not be taught in isolation, but always in support of content objectives
Curriculum Central
The most updated version of curriculum documents will always be available on AISD's Curriculum Central website.

Reasons to utilize Curriculum Central include:
Saving electronic copies of the curriculum documents to your computer allows you to access the entire document (hyperlinks)
The documents are subject to ongoing updates and editing
Curriculum Central is linked to AISD's external website, so it is accessible from home
There's a lot more to Curriculum Central than just the curriculum itself . . .
Password is central
TESTING 101
This is the last year that the state of Texas will assess student knowledge with the Texas Assessment of Knowledge & Skills (TAKS) and this test will only be administered to students enrolled in high school prior to the '11-'12 school year.
8th Grade Social Studies, World Geography, World History, and U.S. History are assessed under the new and more rigorous State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR)
Arlington ISD takes several measures to assess student preparedness for state assessments, including:
Locally-developed Curriculum Assessments for all tested areas (8th, WG, WH, US) and World Cultures and Texas History
Additionally, campus level teams working as PLCs will write additional common assessment items that address local needs and concerns
You'll receive a copy of testing dates at the Social Studies session on August 22nd
ONGOING DEVELOPMENTS . . .
STAAR
This assessment system is being phased in.
Like last year, all 8th graders will take the 8th grade Social Studies STAAR
Any student who entered high school last year is subject to an EOC exam for any social studies course they are enrolled in . . .
While you won't have to escape an "extra strong and large travelling basket" and locks, chains, and ropes, the State and TEA have "raised the bar" with STAAR.
End of Course Exams are significantly more challenging than TAKS, and include a number of questioning formats that are new to Texas assessments, including:
Multiple steps to determine correct answer
More complex distractors
Answers can't be found in visuals
Questions tied to skills TEKS
Mental map required to answer some questions
Higher level vocabulary
More demanding reading passages
Time limit (240 minutes)
The good news is that if you utilize proven instructional strategies to support solid learning objectives based upon the state standards, your students will be prepared to do to STAAR what they have historically done to TAKS . . .
Additionally, one of the main functions of the Social Studies office is to support your efforts in the classroom. We will make you aware of professional development opportunities and resources throughout the year. We will communicate with you through FirstClass conferences:
This TAKS timeline is an AISD created tool to help guide teachers' pacing throughout the year
It also allows teachers to see what material is "fair game" on a curriculum assessment
Updated timelines will be on Curriculum Central very soon . . .
BREAK TIME
OTHER AISD WEB RESOURCES
"Doing History"
THE VALUE OF HAVING STUDENTS ENGAGE WITH A VARIETY OF PRIMARY SOURCE DOCUMENTS AND DOING THE WORK OF HISTORIANS CANNOT BE OVERSTATED
While too numerous to list in their entirety, here is a summary of some of the reasons all social studies teachers should have their students analyze primary source documents on a daily basis:
Primary sources prompt students to ask questions
They encourage students to acknowledge various points of view and to recognize bias
They help establish historical context for events
They allow students to discover and process evidence
They encourage students to compare and contrast evidence and to determine source validity
They allow students to become historians!
Primary source analysis generally brings students to the higher cognitive levels on Bloom's Taxonomy, and prepares them well for many of the challenging questions they will encounter on STAAR
AN ILLUSTRATIVE EXAMPLE:
Imagine you are teaching 8th grade U.S. History and it's May. TAKS testing is behind you and your students. The temptation exists to finish the year with a variety of loosely connected videos that keep the kids quiet, even if they do not support good learning objectives or address the remaining curriculum . . . Fortunately, you decide that Reconstruction is too important an era in U.S. History to exclude from your course . . .
A Tale of Two Approaches
Mr. C (Mr. F is screening movies)
Mr. A
Mr. C knows that TEKS 9(C) states that students should:
explain the conomic, political, and social problems during Reconstruction and evaluate their impact on different groups
He decides that students need to know about the sharecropping system, so he finds a section in the Creating America textbook (p. 527 - 528) and assigns the reading, to be followed by students completing #2 in the Section 2 Assessment on page 528.

Mr. C knows that it's important to model for his students, so he gives them a copy of a graphic organizer on which to write their notes. After giving students time to complete the task, Mr. C projects an image of his completed organizer on the screen and tells students to copy down any information they do not have.

Mr. C tells the class they will be accountable for knowing about sharecropping on their Reconstruction test. After students leave, Mr. C becomes frustrated after finding a number of the students' organizers lying about the room.
Mr. A is also aware that Reconstruction is an important coda that must be taught following his Civil War Unit. He plans to use a variety of primary sources to peak his students interest in the economic, political, and social upheaval characteristic of the era. He too wants to introduce sharecropping as a concept and plans to have his students evaluate the problems it posed to Freedmen seeking economic independence following emancipation and the end of the Civil War. He decides he wants to assess student learning by having students write a hypothetical text message conversation between a sharecropper and a landowner.

Mr. A knows it's sometimes important for students to have some background information about a topic prior to examining primary sources, and he thinks that is probably true in this case. He too decides to have students read the "Sharecropping and Debt" section on page 527 - 528. Before reading, Mr. A instructs students to create a bubble map in their interactive notebooks as they read - they are to write down characteristics of the sharecropping system.

After the students have read, Mr. A asks a student to draw a bubble map on the board and to write down one characteristic of sharecropping. He then asks another student, then another, until all characteristics are listed on the board. After reviewing and discussing the student generated data, Mr. A asks students to sketch a drawing that represents sharecropping in the vocabulary section of their notebooks. After a few minutes, Mr. A asks for a student volunteer who would like to share their drawing with the class using either the document camera or by walking around the room. Mr. A announces that the student's drawing has been selected to represent "Sharecropping" on the classroom word wall. The student is quite pleased because they will receive extra credit as a reward for their selection.

Mr. A now knows that his students have at least a basic understanding of sharecropping. He knows they are ready to examine and analyze a challenging primary source document - a sharecrop contract.
Mr. A understands this is a fairly challenging, and long, primary source document that contains some unfamiliar vocabulary. He plans to jigsaw (cut into pieces) the document and give a part to individual students (or pairs of students) for analysis
He is up front with students and tells them that they'll have to use their inferencing skills and context clues to understand some of the words
Keeping the student assessment in mind, he instructs students to create a t-chart in their notebook: one column will describe the rights of the landowner, the other will contain rights of the sharecropper
Students read and discuss their portion of the source, and then record their findings on their t-charts
Mr. A creates a t-chart on the board and has students add information to it as he goes from student to student or from pair to pair
As students report out, Mr. A reteaches and fills in missing gaps if necessary
Mr. A asks students to write a paragraph below their t-chart summarizing the power relationship that existed between landowner and sharecropper, and asks them to generalize how the sharecropping system caused economic problems for Freedmen.
Mr. A completes a check for understanding by briefly touring the room and reading the student's summary statements.
Convinced that students understand the sharecropping system and the dynamic between the landowner and sharecropper, he assigns students the performance task (assessment), along with a text message glossary to facilitate their work. Mr. A provides students with a copy of and explains the rubric he will use to grade their text-messaging conversation.
Mr. A's students are confident and excited about demonstrating what they've learned and about creating something fun and new. Mr. A has set his students up to be successful.
VOCABULARY STRATEGIES
THE WIDE SPECTRUM OF ASSESSMENT
ASSESSMENT
It is vital to remember that assessment is on-going: if a teacher waits until the end of a topic or unit to assess her students, she'll have no time left to reteach. The pressure of moving on to the next content piece will result in some students falling behind . . .
Assessment begins prior to and should continue throughout a lesson
Pre-Assessments:
Formative assessment that occurs while exploring student prior knowledge, misconceptions, and lack of understanding
Checks for Understanding through:
Observations
Student Questions
Teacher Questions
Assignments / Homework:
Assessment that emphasizes practice, preparation, extension, and/or creation
Group / Peer / Self
Assessment:
Places some responsibility for assessment on the student, generally through the use of rubrics.
Quizzes / Tests:
Assessment that requires students to either select or provide a correct answer. Only test what has been taught, please.
Performance Tasks:
Generally a project based assessment that provides an opportunity to measure a student's ability to demonstrate mastery (rubric based)
FIRST DAY OF CLASS
What do you intend to accomplish during class on the first day of school?
Take five minutes and write down your goals for day one
After five minutes, share your goals with a partner
After sharing and discussing your goals, we'll share ideas as a group
Think, Pair, Share
FIRST DAY GOALS:
SHOULD INCLUDE:
MIGHT INCLUDE:
Establishing positive expectations
The teacher describing her background, etc.
Establishing a well-ordered environment based upon clear rules and helpful procedures
Reviewing safety procedures
Conveying a sense of preparedness, professionalism, and warmth
Some type of assignment for students to complete while the teacher takes care of administrative tasks
An "ice-breaker" to help the teacher and students get to know each other
An introductory lesson that connects to the course content
THINGS TO CONSIDER:
Plan more than enough to fill the period - don't allow students to form the impression that there will be lots of "down time" in your class
Many of your students will not be in class on the first day (still on vacation, getting a schedule change, etc.), so there is no reason to teach some elaborate, content-based lesson if you'll just have to reteach the material later
Providing students will a copy of your rules / consequences and procedures. Have them sign for it.
Assign student seating at least for the first few weeks of class
You never get a second chance to make a first impression . . .
BREAK TIME
CHALLENGES
One of the most significant challenges that teachers face is taking the state standards, or a curriculum document, and deciding how to chunk content into manageable and effective order. On top of that, they must also decide how to teach the material.
The Social Studies department has created a handout that summarizes the key steps for planning an effective social studies lesson.
Q & A
A FINAL REMINDER:
We're here to help and support your efforts in the classroom, so please do not hesitate to contact us if you need anything.
Please fill out an evaluation before you leave - we appreciate your time and your feedback.
Best wishes for a fantastic school year here in Arlington ISD!
There are a variety of primary source analysis forms available to assist students in their analysis:
U.S. NATIONAL ARCHIVES
APPARTS
SOAPS (tone)
PLEASE REMEMBER, LEARNING IS NOT A SPECTATOR SPORT
Like a football player, students learn by doing, by being active, and by being challenged.
No successful coach would wait until Saturday or Sunday to find out what his/her players were capable of . . . and they certainly wouldn't waste practice time or come to practice without a plan

Please draw a circle on a blank piece of paper
On the inside of the circle, write down all the characteristics that describe a successful coach
On the outside of the circle, list the characteristics of an unsuccessful or ineffective coach
Learning Objective Review
Understand the importance of concept-based curriculum and instruction and its essential components.
Recognize the essential steps in social studies lesson planning.
Traits of an
Effective Coach
To sum it up, your instructional decision making
should begin with a careful examination of course standards.
Unit Header
Curriculum central can be accessed via the AISD website (www.aisd.net)
Please take a few moments to explore
Curriculum Central and your course's homepage.
STAAR RESOURCES
Another infamous STAR . . .
Vocabulary Acquisition
MARZANO
FRAYER
FOUR
CORNERS
WORD
WALL
Six Step Process:
Provide a description, explanation, and/or example of the new term
Students restate the definition in their own words
Students construct a picture, symbol, or graphic that represents the term
Build
Review
Play
Student writes:
The term
The definition
Characteristics
Examples
Non-examples
Student writes:
The term
The definition
A sentence
An illustration
A collection of academic vocabulary terms
(paired with illustrations)
posted in a classroom and organized by topic
Which to choose?
Why not take the best
components of each and synthesize them together into a new method?
Students must construct their own meaning
Students are visual learners
Students need the opportunity to collaborate
Keys to consider:
A Stark Reality
Copying a definition from a book, or doing a definition-matching worksheet, does little to engage or prepare students for STAAR
Take the Best
Definition in student's words
Examples / Non-examples
Illustration
Share & Discuss
Word Wall
Leave the Rest
Rote memorization
Copying definition word for word
No discussion
No application
No recall
WINDOW PANE PROCESSING
TERM
DEFINITION IN STUDENT'S OWN WORDS
ACCULTURATION IS WHEN A COUNTRY'S CULTURE CHANGES AS A RESULT OF OUTSIDE INFLUENCES
EXAMPLES:
COCA COLA CONSUMED AROUND THE WORLD
PREDOMINANCE OF SPOKEN ENGLISH
"WESTERN" CLOTHING
GLOBAL RELIGIONS
NON-EXAMPLES:
DISTINCT NATIONAL IDENTITIES, DESPITE ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL UNION (EU)
RELIGIOUS BACKLASH AGAINST OUTSIDE / NON-TRADITIONAL INFLUENCES (TALIBAN)
EURO DISNEY CONTROVERSY
ILLUSTRATION
most importantly
Students need to discuss and explain their processing with their classmates
Good illustrations should be celebrated and shared
Word wall contests should be held
Quality examples should be referred to repeatedly
while it's not always pleasant,
we must remember:
learning is noisy,
death is quiet
students make meaning
by discussing concepts
with their peers
And don't forget to have students construct a timeline on a wall, too!
Mental Mapping
World History
Unit 1:
Development of River Valley
Civilizations
with Juli Warner
Prehistory &
Neolithic Revolution

Development of
E.R.C.

Two Days
Two Days
Day One:
90 minutes
???
Day Two:
90 minutes
???
Social Studies Lesson Planning Template
We are about to break into course-level groups to practice the lesson planning process. This collaborative planning will consist of two parts:
creating a Unit overview plan
and
writing an individual lesson plan
using the SS Department's template.
Lunch 11:30 - 1:00
"By providing teachers course standards,
does the SBOE and TEA provide us with course curriculum?"
Please discuss with a neighbor . . .
These resources are all available
on curriculum central --
let's take some time to discuss each of them.
Questions?
Please fold your paper in half to create a T-Chart
which you will use to compare Mr. C and Mr. A
Curriculum Central: Social Studies Homepage
Practice Time
empire:
a (1): a major political unit having a territory of great extent or a number of territories or peoples under a single sovereign authority; especially: one having an emperor as chief of state
FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT
SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT
In your opinion,
which type of assessment is
most valuable to students?
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