Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Charles Janet's Left Step Periodic Table

No description
by

sarah peterson

on 11 November 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Charles Janet's Left Step Periodic Table

Advantages
- Displays the elements in one continuous sequence without any gaps or interruptions

- Displays the order of orbital filling more clearly than the conventional form

- Arranged by increasing atomic number
Charles Janet
June 15, 1849 – February 7, 1932
Sources
"Alternative Periodic Tables." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 8 Nov. 2015. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alternative_periodic_tables#Left_step_periodic_table_.28Janet.2C_1928.29>.

"Charles Janet." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 08 Nov. 2015. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Janet>.
Charles Janet was a French engineer, company director, inventor and biologist. Janet graduated from the École des Mines. He worked for his father in law's manufacturing company and collected fossils and other specimens.

Charles Janet's Left Step Periodic Table
Left Step Periodic Table
The Left Step Periodic Table was devised by Janet in 1929 to create a simpler and more straightforward periodic table. The Left Step Periodic Table organizes elements according to orbital filling and is widely used by physicists. It showcases which electron shells are filled, from top to bottom.
Disadvantages
- Does not have a smooth transition from metals to nonmetals

- Helium is moved from its place with the noble gases
by: sarah peterson
Full transcript