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Unit 4: War and Conflict

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Kristen Barrett

on 26 February 2014

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Transcript of Unit 4: War and Conflict

Bell Work (cont.)
You have 1 minute to answer this question. It pertains to the section of the text in italics.

3. Robin Hood was also given a love
interest; Maid
Marian.
Bell Work:
You have 1 minute to answer this question. Write your answer in the Bell Work section of your binder. Your answer will be to the section of the text in italics.







Bell Work (cont.)
You have one minute to answer this question. It pertains to the section of the text in italics.

2. A popular modern belief that Robin Hood was of the time of King Richard I probably stems the antiquary Richard
Stukely's fabrication
of a "pedigree."

"What the Bullet Sang" by Bret Harte
What poetic device do you notice in the title of this poem?
Thinking Strategies
Partner/Group Activity
You will work with 1-2 other people (groups of NO MORE THAN 3) to complete this activity. Take 30 seconds to move so that you are sitting with your partner/group.

I will assign your group a number. If you are assigned #1, your group should try Thinking Strategy #1, Creating Sensory Images. If you are assigned #2, your group should try Thinking Strategy #2, Questioning. The next slide describes what you should do.
Unit 4: War and Conflict
1. If you are like most visitors to Athens, you will make your way to the
Acropolis, the hill
that once served as a fortified, strategic position overlooking the Aegean Sea--to see the Parthenon.
A. No change
B. Acropolis. The hill
C. Acropolis--the hill
D. Acropolis
A. No change
B. Stukelys fabrication
C. Stukelys fabrication,
D. Stukely's, fabrication
A. No change
B. interests--Maid
C. interest: Maid
D. interest--Maid
#1 - C

The dash after 'Aegean Sea' shows that the writer has chosen to set off the phrase that describes 'Acropolis' with a dash instead of a comma. This is OK, as long as there is a dash both at the end and the beginning of the phrase.
#2 - A

We need the possessive apostrophe in this question. (Choices B and C are the plural, not the possessive, form of 'Stukely.' Choice D is wrong because there is no comma necessary.)
#3 - D

Maid Marian is an appositive (renames "love interest") so it needs to be set off with either a comma or a dash. (Semicolons separate IND clauses; plural noun 'interests' does not agree w/singular 'a.')
1. Creating sensory images = Creating pictures in your head or on paper to help build understanding

2. Questioning = Actively asking questions as you read to clarify confusion and to engage with the text
Creating Sensory Images
Read through the poem once with your group. Then, re-read it. As you read, draw 3 pictures on the poem that show images created in your mind. Draw a line from each picture to the line that you used to create the image. (You should turn in one set of pictures for each group, so make sure all group members' names are on the paper you draw on.)
Questioning
Read through the poem once with your group. Go back and re-read it, writing two questions you have about the poem for your group member(s) to answer. You should write the questions directly on the poem, and make sure your name is at the top. Now, ask your questions to your group member(s), writing their responses below where you wrote the question.
On a separate sheet of paper, please answer the following question:
(If your thinking strategy was #1): Describe the character of the bullet. Name some of "his" character traits.


(If your thinking strategy was #2): In one to two sentences, what is the message of this poem?
"Grass" by Carl Sandburg
This time, you and your group/partner will try the OTHER thinking strategy.
1. Creating sensory images = Creating pictures in your head or on paper to help build understanding

2. Questioning = Actively asking questions as you read to clarify confusion and to engage with the text
Creating Sensory Images
Questioning
Read through the poem once with your group. Then, re-read it. As you read, draw 3 pictures on the poem that show images created in your mind. Draw a line from each picture to the line that you used to create the image. (You should turn in one set of pictures for each group, so make sure all group members' names are on the paper you draw on.)
Read through the poem once with your group. Go back and re-read it, writing two questions you have about the poem for your group member(s) to answer. You should write the questions directly on the poem, and make sure your name is at the top. Now, ask your questions to your group member(s), writing their responses below where you wrote the question.
(If your thinking strategy was Creating Sensory Images:) Who is the narrator? What is the job of the narrator?
Individual Questions
Answer on the sheet of paper with the previous answer.
(If your thinking strategy was Questioning:)
What is the message/main idea of this poem?
Protest Songs
Carl Sandburg was a former soldier who held Socialist beliefs. He is considered an inspiration to many who wrote protest songs.
"Sunday Bloody Sunday"
In 1972, 26 civil-rights protesters in Northern Ireland were shot by the British army. 14 people died, and many were horrified by the event. Irish band U2 wrote a song, "Sunday Bloody Sunday," to protest the event.

Monday, January 13, 2014
Learning Target
REL 5.1 - I can explain cause and effect relationships identifying textual evidence to support why an event/action produced a certain effect.
Formative Assessment (To be completed individually)
In a paragraph, summarize (put in your own words) the MESSAGE of one of the poems. Objectively state 2-3 of the author's main points. (Do not state your OWN opinion, and avoid 1st and 2nd person pronouns.)

Place this paragraph in the class bin when finished, along with the poem you wrote on to complete the group activity.
Bell Work
You have one minute to answer this question. The answer pertains to the section in italics.

1. Then one day, Mother Nature
intervened
, giving me the opportunity to cover an international event.
A. NO CHANGE
B. intervened:
C. intervened;
D. --intervened--
Bell Work (cont.)
2. I had to maintain a high enough altitude to avoid both the smoke being emitted
from: the crater
and the ashen residue already in the atmosphere.
A. NO CHANGE
B. (from: the crater)
C. from, the crater,
D. from the crater
Bell Work (cont.)
3.
Fires ignited by lightning, in June,
had been allowed to burn unsuppressed because park officials expected that the usual summer rains would douse them.
A. NO CHANGE
B. Fires having been ignited by lightning, in June,
C. Fires ignited by lightning in June
D. Fires ignited by lightning in June,
#1: A
In this case, the comma signals a pause. (Colons signify lists or definitions. Semicolons only go between 2 IND clauses. D would create a sentence with no verb.)
#2: D
A colon is not needed here because a colon should be followed by a definition or a list.
#3: C
There is no reason to set off 'in June' from the rest of the sentence. It is not acting as an appositive. It is necessary to the sentence.
Quotation Mingle
We will shortly read an important passage from a book. To help you better understand the passage, I've prepared a "preview" by cutting out just eight sentences from the longer piece. I will distribute these randomly.
Now everyone has one piece of the puzzle. If you could see other people's sentences, you might be able to make a good prediction as to what the whole thing is about. That is what you are going to do now.

At a wedding, many couples feel obligated to "mingle"--spending time with each person who attended. At a big wedding, this might mean only one to two minutes with each person. This is the idea for today's quotation mingle.
Your job is to figure out what today's reading is about by reading the sentence you have and then hearing seven other sentences. With each person you talk to, discuss what the whole reading might be about. The more people you'll talk to, the more quotes you'll see--plus, the people you talk to can tell you about the other quotes they have seen.
When you need a partner, just wave your hand in the air. When you find a partner, take turns reading the quotations aloud--then talk. Try to see ten people. There are only eight quotes here, so you might see some quotes more than once.

You will have four minutes to mingle.
Now, sit in groups of four. (You may choose your own groups.) Discuss with your group:

What do you think the passage is going to be about?

What time and place are depicted?

Any guesses about who wrote this?

Between the four of you, you probably saw all eight quotes. Take four minutes. Have a good conversation!
Soldier's Heart
This is one page from the novel Soldier's Heart by Gary Paulsen. Take a few minutes to read this page, and keep in mind how accurate your predictions and inferences were.
If Charley survived the war--which we cannot tell from this passage--how do you think he would do? Would he be able to go right back to normal life, or do you think he might have had to struggle with his memories? Do you think he might suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder? (Turn and talk with your group for two minutes about whether Charley might suffer from PTSD, basing your prediction on facts in the text.)
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder that is triggered by a traumatic event. You can develop PTSD when you experience or witness an event that causes fear, helplessness, or horor. In some cases, the symptoms can get worse and last for months or even years. Sometimes they may completely disrupt your life.
Choice Article
Now, you will read an article of your choice about PTSD. Warning: the first two are intense accounts from a battlefield, so please consider your own sensibilities before you choose one of those options.
+A Soldier's Letter Home from WWII: Written by an American GI serving in the Pacific, graphically telling his parents about the combat casualities he had seen
+"The Forever War of the Mind": Max Cleland, former head of the VA, recounts how he lost an arm and both legs in battle--and describes the mental anguish that accompanied his physical wounds
+"Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)": Basic problems associated with PTSD, from the US Veterans Administration
+Blog Post - "Daddy's Home": Written by the wife of a decorated soldier who suffers from PTSD, this article offers tips for families in the same situation
Once you have your choice article, sit with a small group of students who have chosen the same piece. (Groups should be 3-5 members. Larger groups should split up.)
Each person will read the article individually. As you read, mark on the article using one of the THINKING STRATEGIES we practiced yesterday. (CREATING SENSORY IMAGES and QUESTIONING) Use the one you found more helpful.
You have 7 minutes to read and draw/ask questions. (At least 3 pictures or questions.)
Discussion Questions
If you read one of the battlefield articles, do you think you would suffer from PTSD if you were in the same situation? Why or why not? Be specific. While we can never predict exactly how we might respond in an unknown situation, share what you think might happen. Jot down a few key quotes you hear from group members as they answer this question.

If you read one of the other two articles, what are some things that family members and friends can do to help someone suffering from PTSD? Make a list of specific actions.
Formative Assessment
1. Quote two lines from your text.
2. In your own words, explain what happened.
3. Explain the effect (what happened next) of these quotes individually.
(Place in tray when finished)
Bell Work
1. The situation remained out of
control in spite of
the efforts of 9,000 firefighters.
A. NO CHANGE
B. control. In spite of
C. control; despite
D. control; in spite of
1 = A
No additional punctuation is necessary. B would create a sentence fragment. C and D would both place a semicolon between an independent clause and a dependent clause. However, a semicolon should only separate 2 IND clauses.
Bell Work (cont.)
2. Somehow, my good friend Gretchen convinced me to join
our schools
swim team.
2 - C
C is correct because a possessive apostrophe is needed. (The swim team belongs to the school.) A and D use no apostrophe, so they are not correct. B uses the plural possessive, but only one school is being discussed.
A. NO CHANGE
B. our schools'
C. our school's
D. ours school
Bell Work (cont.)
3. In contrast, most of the other swimmers, who
had been swimming competitively, since elementary school,
were able to somersault and begin the next lap.
A. NO CHANGE
B. had been swimming competitively since elementary school,
C. had been swimming, competitively since elementary school,
D. had been swimming competitively since elementary school
3 - B
If you omitted the phrase, "who had been swimming competitively since elementary school," you would still have a complete sentence. Therefore, this phrase needs to be set off from the rest of the sentence. A comma needs to be used at the end of the phrase since it is used at the beginning. This makes choice D incorrect. A and C insert unnecessary commas into the phrase.
Monday, January 13, 2014
Learning Target
MID 3.1 - I can write an objective summary of a text by determining the author's main points.
What is a hero?
On a full sheet of paper, list 3-5 characteristics of a hero.
Tim O'Brien (born 1946)
O'Brien is a famous writer who is also a Vietnam War veteran. He was drafted into the U.S. Army while attending college. He insists it is not his job or his place to discuss the politics of the Vietnam War.
Individually complete “Heroes” by Tim O’Brien. Use the same sheet of paper that lists your hero characteristics to answer questions 1-10 from the speech.

Complete your thinking strategy on the worksheet.

Formative Assessment
Write an OBJECTIVE summary of O’Brien’s speech, stating only facts, not opinions. Avoid first and second person pronouns. For full credit, include 3-4 of his main points in your summary.

1. I was
captivated; by
all that there was to learn about life in the Mississippi.
2. After seeing
all, I could inside the museum,
I wandered outside.
3. For six years, Ruth
Reichl the restaurant critic for the New York Times,
used aliases and costumes as a regular part of her job.
Answer this question with the correct letter, then explain either the correct answer or one of the wrong answers using a punctuation rule. Answer this question on a half sheet of paper that you will turn in.
Example: Answer C is incorrect because it would create a sentence fragment.
A. NO CHANGE
B. captivated, by
C. captivated by,
D. captivated by
1 - D
Choice A is wrong because a semicolon should only be used to separate two IND clauses. B & C use unnecessary commas.
A. NO CHANGE
B. all I could inside the museum,
C. all, I could inside the museum
D. all I could inside the museum
2 - B
The introductory phrase "After seeing all I could inside the museum" should not be interrupted with commas. A comma should not separate the verb ("seeing") from its object ("museum")
A. NO CHANGE
B. Reichl, the restaurant critic, for the New York Times,
C. Reichl, the restaurant critic for the New York Times,
D.Reichl the restaurant critic for the New York Times
3 - C
"The restaurant critic for the New York Times" is an appositive (phrase that describes a noun) so it needs to be set off with commas or dashes. Choices A and D fail to use both necessary commas, and G inserts an unnecessary 3rd comma.
Tuesday, January 14, 2014
Learning Target
I can explain cause & effect relationships, identifying textual evidence to support why an action/event produced a certain effect.
Cause/Effect Transition Words
Cause: Because, Since, On account of, For that reason

Effect: Therefore, Thus, Consequently, Hence, Accordingly, As a result
PTSD: One Soldier's Story
Thinking strategy: Synthesizing

Combining new information with existing knowledge to form an original idea or see a new perspective.
Read "One Soldier's Story" individually. It details the events that led to one man's PTSD. Spend 15 minutes QUIETLY reading to yourself.
Now, you will work in a group of 2-3 (no more than 3 per group.) Your group should NOT consist of the person you partnered with to answer the Synthesizing questions. Talk to each other about the 3 questions each of you chose to answer. Compare answers, and discuss responses. Spend about 5 minutes on this discussion.
Once you have discussed your responses, turn over the sheet with the discussion questions. Fill in the table with 5 causes, and their effects. (Each person must complete their own table, but you may discuss with partners before filling out the table.)
Work with a partner to answer any 3 of the 5 "Synthesizer" questions. Each person should answer the questions on a separate piece of paper, though your answers MAY be the same as your partner's. Spend about 7 minutes answering the questions.
Formative Assessment (complete individually)
Write a paragraph explaining the causes and effects of the soldier's experiences in war. Detail 3 cause & effect relationships, and use text evidence to explain. Use the table you and your partner filled out. Try to use 3 different cause & effect transition words. Write your paragraph on the separate sheet of paper on which you wrote the answers to your 3 questions. When finished, place JUST this paper in the bin in the back of the room. (Keep the article and the table with questions in your binder.)
Learning Target
Tuesday, January 14, 2014
REL 4.1 - I can interpret
explicit
and
implicit
cause and effect relationships in a text.

Explicit vs. Implicit
What is the relationship of the two people in the picture? What makes you say this?
Implicit: The relationship between the two people is ________.

How would you define "implicit"?
Explicit: The people in the picture are __________________.

How would you define "explicit"?
Implicit: Implied though not plainly expressed



Explicit: Stated clearly and in detail, leaving no room for confusion or doubt
"The Newsroom"
Watch this TV clip. The main actor plays a TV news anchor. Write down 3 EXPLICIT statements from his speech and one IMPLICIT statement. Label the statements.
John Steinbeck
American author, 1902-1968
Famous works: Of Mice and Men; The Grapes of Wrath
Though he was not a soldier, he was a WWII correspondent. He accompanied soldiers on raids and returned from the war with shrapnel wounds and psychological trauma.
Why Soldiers Won't Talk
(Learning strategy: Synthesize)
We will read the first paragraph together. As you read, highlight or underline words you don't know as well as the most important sentence in the paragraph.
Now, annotate on the article WHY the sentence you chose is the most important.
Look up the definition of one word you do not know, and write it in the margin.

Discussion question: What is Steinbeck implying (IMPLICIT) about the soldiers when he says they "had no such consideration in any other field"?
We will read the 3rd paragraph. As we read, underline two EXPLICIT effects that combat has on the human body, according to Steinbeck.
Explicit Effects
Which of the following is an IMPLICIT detail from the 5th paragraph?
A. A person in battle feels like they are moving slowly.
B. There are difficult psychological as well as physical effects of war, particularly on those in combat.
C. The food in a soldier's stomach feels undigested.
D. Blurry vision could be considered a "side effect" of war.
In the 6th paragraph, Steinbeck names a number of qualities, then states that the exception to these are called "shell-shock cases." Write in the margin of the paragraph two qualities a person with "shell-shock" might have.
Shell-Shock
In the 7th paragraph, Steinbeck states that a "kind man is capable of great cruelties." SYNTHESIZE by drawing on prior knowledge. In the margin, make a note of a previous reading from this unit. (PTSD: One Soldier's Story; Soldier's Heart; The PTSD choice article) BE SPECIFIC. What happened in that piece that was an example of a kind person capable of cruelty?
According to the 8th and 9th paragraph, the body creates a kind of anesthesia while it is engaged in combat. What are two EXPLICIT ways that Steinbeck describes the anesthesia wearing off?
After reading paragraphs 10 and 11, explain Steinbeck's theory on the cause and effect relationship between war and the body. Why won't soldiers talk? Be sure to use two EXPLICIT and two IMPLICIT details in your response. Try to use two cause & effect transition words, and remain OBJECTIVE in your explanation.
Formative Assessment (on the sheet you used to answer the 3 questions)
Bell Work
1. Owners may dig out their manuals when something goes
wrong, such as a flat tire or flashing engine light
but few car owners take the time to learn the basics.
A. NO CHANGE
B. wrong; such as a flat tire or a flashing engine light
C. wrong, such as a flat tire, or a flashing engine light
D. wrong, such as a flat tire or a flashing engine light,
1 - D
When one of the FANBOYS ("but") separates 2 IND clauses, there needs to be a comma BEFORE the FANBOY.
2. Before you get started, read the oil change
section, in your owner's manual
and collect all of the tools you will need.
A. NO CHANGE
B. section, in your owner's manual,
C. section in your owner's manual;
D. section in your owner's manual
2 - D
Information that is key to the main idea of a sentence should NOT be set off by a comma.
3. Never get under a car that is supported only by car
jacks; you
do not want to risk being crushed by a car.
A. NO CHANGE
B. jacks, you
C. jacks you
D. jacks you,
3 - A
This sentence shows correct use of a semicolon, as it separates 2 IND clauses.
With a partner, complete the 3 questions at the end of "Why Soldiers Won't Talk." Be sure to answer in complete sentences. Answer these on a separate sheet of paper.

Bell Work
1. After they gained independence from the Turks,
they
began to demand the sculptures and carvings back from the British, to no avail.
A. NO CHANGE
B. the Turks
C. the Greeks
D. who
#1 - C
"They" is an ambiguous pronoun. (It is unclear who 'they' refers to.) "They" could not be the Turks, since "they" gained independence from the Turks.
2. However, references to the Robin Hood legends by medieval writers make it clear that the ballads were the only evidence for Robin's existence available to
them
.
A. NO CHANGE
B. him.
C. it.
D. those writing ballads about him.
#2 - A
"Them" matches the plural noun it stands for: writers. "Him" and "it" are both singular, so they don't work. Choice D is overly wordy. (Remember: short and sweet, as long as it makes sense, is best.)
3. I always envisioned
myself
in some faraway exotic place performing dangerous deeds.
A. NO CHANGE
B. I
C. me
D. it
#3 - A
"I always envisioned I" and "I always envisioned me" are both grammatically incorrect. "Myself" is the right pronoun to follow "I + verb."
1. Fans of Holmes might be surprised to discover that
he
did not want to be remembered as the author of the Sherlock Holmes stories.
A. NO CHANGE
B. Conan Doyle
C. they
D. the detective
#1 - B
"He" is an ambiguous pronoun. It is unclear who 'he' refers to. After reading the whole sentence, you know that "he" is Doyle, so use Doyle's name for clarity.
2. Doyle never seems to have asked
himself: why they
would manifest themselves in such curious ways.
A. NO CHANGE
B. himself--why they
C. himself why those in the other world
D. himself why they
#2 - D
A is wrong because the colon does not belong there, and "they" is ambiguous. D gets rid of the colon and states what the pronoun was supposed to refer to.
3. The situation remained out of control despite the efforts of 9,000 firefighters
employed
state-of-the-art equipment.
A. NO CHANGE
B. who employed
C. which were employing
D. which employed
#3 - B
This sentence needs a relative clause after "firefighters." However, the relative pronoun "which" cannot be used when referring to a person or a group of people.
1. The team was made up of twenty young
women, most of these swimmers
had been participating in the community swim team for years.
A. NO CHANGE
B. women, the majority of them
C. women most of them
D. women, most of whom
Choices A & B both create comma splices. Choice C creates a run-on sentence.
#1 - D
2. Our coach,
whom
had led the team to several state championships, demanded dedication from everyone on the team.
A. NO CHANGE
B. for whom
C. who
D. which
#2 - C
The pronoun "who" always acts as the subject (like "he" and "she.") The pronoun "whom" always acts as the object (like "him" and "her.") Since "coach" is the subject of the sentence, "who" is correct. Never refer to a person as "which."
3. Although secret identities and elaborate disguises are typically associated with the world of spies and other villains,
it has
other uses.
A. NO CHANGE
B. it does have
C. they do have
D. and they have
#3 - C
The underlined pronoun refers to the plural "secret identities and elaborate disguises." Choice C uses the correct plural pronoun: "they." A & B create pronoun agreement errors by using the singular "it." D creates a sentence fragment.
Pronouns
Verb Usage Bell Work
1. For years, physical
education being
often the worst part of the school day for me.

A. NO CHANGE
B. education, was
C. education was
D. education,

#1 - C
C forms a complete sentence by using the simple past tense "was." A creates a sentence fragment; an -ing verb needs a helping verb ("was" or "is") to be the main verb in the sentence. B incorrectly uses a comma to separate the subject from the main verb. D creates a fragment.
How to Tell a True War Story
Thursday, January 30, 2014
Learning Target:

WCH 3.2 - I can infer the tone of a text through examination of the author's word choices and phrasing.

"How to Tell a True War Story" by Tim O'Brien
This is a story from O'Brien's book of short stories,
The Things They Carried
. O'Brien is a Vietnam veteran, and each story in the book is about soldiers in the Vietnam War.

Thinking Strategy: Activating Background Knowledge
Using what we already know about ourselves, another text, or the world to help us understand what we are reading or learning.
We will read Section I of the story as a group.

As you read, circle or highlight any unfamiliar words or phrases.

When we finish this section, see if you can use your knowledge of words to define one of the words you chose. Write what you think the definition is in the margin.
We will read Section II of the story as a group. (Volunteer to read?)
As you read, highlight or circle any terms you do not know.



When we are finished reading, try to define the words you chose by writing their definitions in the margin, using your background knowledge of words, the military, or history.
Baby Water Buffalo
In a group of 2-3 (no more than 3 people), read Section III of the story.

As you read, each person should make notes in the margin of section 3 of something from your own life that the incident described makes you think of. Discuss the notes you made with the people in your group. This should take 6-7 minutes.
Discussion questions: (Talk about these questions with your group. Each person in the group should answer these questions IN COMPLETE SENTENCES on a separate sheet of paper.) Be prepared to discuss your answers when finished.

1. How did the description of the water buffalo incident with Rat Kiley make you feel? Why?

2. What is the narrator's tone when he describes what happened to the buffalo? Write one line from the story to support your answer. (Remember: Introduce, Cite, Explain.)

3. What is the narrator's tone when he describes Rat Kiley's behavior during the buffalo incident? Write two lines from the story to support your answer. (Use the I.C.E. method.)

Place your completed questions in the class bin. They will count as your formative assessment.
MID 4.2 - I can identify subtle evidence that conveys the author's or narrator's point of view in a text.
Learning Target
Friday, January 31, 2014
Activating Background Knowledge:

Fold a sheet of paper in half, lengthwise. At the top of the left half, write the word "war."

You have 90 seconds. Write down everything you think of when you hear the word "war."
-Strangest?

-Most surprising?
Now, on the right side of the folded paper, write the word "love." (Make sure the paper is folded so you can't see what you wrote on the left side.)

You have 90 seconds to write everything you think of when you hear the word "love."
At the bottom of the paper you folded, write two statements: (COMPLETE SENTENCES)

1. Similarities between the ideas of love and war

2. Differences between the ideas of love and war
"Love and War"

As you watch the following video, take notes on the back of the folded paper:

-How is "love"defined in the video?

-How are the ideas of love and war linked in the video?
"How to Tell a True War Story"
Silently read section IV, answering the questions on the next slide.

You may work in a group of 2-3 (no more than 3 per group.) However, each individual must submit his or her own set of answers to the questions. You will need a full sheet of paper for this exercise. You have 10 minutes to complete the activity.
1. In Section IV, the narrator makes a number of contradictory statements about war. Choose ONE statement, and explain what it means.

2. Locate a simile in Section IV. Write it, and explain what it means.

3. What is one way the narrator depicts war as beautiful in Section IV?
We will read Section V together.
Why did Dave Jensen sing "Lemon Tree" while completing his task?
Read Section VI with your group.

After you read the description of the incident, activate background knowledge by writing in the margin: What is a "yes or no" question where the answer matters?
With your group, read Sections VI and VII.

Answer the following question on the sheet with your answers for Section IV:
4. Why might the narrator have chosen to include the description of the sunlight and the line, "Sunlight was killing him"?
Formative Assessment (to be completed individually):

Read Section VIII.

Write a paragraph in response to the following question:

At the end of the story, the narrator states, "It
wasn't
a war story. It was a
love
story." What are two pieces of evidence showing that this is, in fact, a love story? Remember to use the I.C.E. method.
How to Tell a True War Story
The Man He Killed
WCH 3.1 - I can identify appropriate words and phrases to use in a given text to maintain a specific tone.
Learning Target:
Thinking Strategy:

Determining Importance - Finding key ideas, concepts, and themes
"The Man He Killed" by Thomas Hardy
-Hardy lived in England, 1840-1928
-Famous novelist and poet
-Did not fight in war
Spend 30 seconds getting into a a group of 2-3 (no more than 3)

Each group will be assigned a stanza of "The Man He Killed" and answer the questions related to that stanza.
Be ready to discuss your answers. You have 7 minutes to answer the questions for your stanza.
Formative Assessment (to be completed individually):
Part 1: What is the tone of the narrator in this poem? What specific words show this tone?
Part 2: What can the reader conclude about the narrator from this poem? What kind of person is he?
2. Things
begun
to get serious in the second week, when we started the regular schedule of four early morning and five afternoon practices.
A. NO CHANGE
B. had been begun
C. had began
D. began
#2 - D
Begun" cannot be used by itself, but "began" can. "Begun" always appears with
has
,
have
, or
had
. D correctly uses the simple past tense verb
began
. B creates a verb usage error by inserting
been
. C is incorrect because had is never used with
began
.
3. A large tank stocked with fish and turtles
was there
to greet us as we walked into the main hall.
A. NO CHANGE
B. is there
C. are there
D. were there

#3 - A
The verb
was
agrees with the singular noun
tank
. Choice B uses present tense, but the rest of the sentence is in past tense ("walked.") C and D incorrectly use the verb in plural form.
4. In the next aquarium, I
see
a catfish bigger than I had ever imagined this species could be.

A. NO CHANGE
B. had been seeing
C. saw
D. spot
#4 - C
The surrounding verbs in the sentence are past tense, so this sentence should use the simple past tense
saw
. Choices A and D use the present tense, and B illogically uses the past progressive
had been seeing
.
5. Suddenly, though, it
slid into the water and aims
itself at the glass separating me from its ferocious claws and skin-tearing teeth.
A. NO CHANGE
B. slides into the water while at the same time aiming
C. slid into the water and aiming
D. slid into the water and aimed
#5 - D
D contains consistent past-tense verbs (
slid
and
aimed
.) A & C use inconsistent verb tenses (past/present), and B is overly wordy.
6. A positive review from the
Times
could have brought
a restaurant unimagined success and month-long waiting lists for reservations, while a negative review can cut into a restaurant's profits.
A. NO CHANGE
B. can bring
C. will have brought
D. will be bringing
#6 - B
The right answer must show consistent verb tense with the rest of the sentence (
can cut
.) A illogically uses the conditional
can
in the past tense. C and D do not use the conditional
can
at all.
7. This is truly unfortunate, as a few simple and routine steps
improves the long-term performance of an automobile and decreases
the possibility of a traffic accident.
A. NO CHANGE
B. improve the long-term performance of an automobile and decreases
C. improve the long-term performance of an automobile and decrease
D. improves the long-term performance of an automobile and decrease
The verbs must agree with the plural subject
steps
; only C puts both
improve
and
decrease
in the correct form.
#7 - C
Learning Target: W.11-12.2c

I can write explanatory texts to examine and clarify the relationships between complex ideas and concepts.
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