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US immigration

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by

Elise Schultz

on 6 June 2011

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Transcript of US immigration

Christopher Columbus 1492 The start of the European influence on the American continent 1609 1619 1776 1820 First Wave 1862 1845 - 1850 1848 1882 1890 1914 1930 WW2 60's/70's Present day Mayflower Reasons
Wanted to have freedom to pursuit
their religion African Slaves Cotton Workers WASP Germany, Britain and France
The conflict between England and the British
colonies about taxation
The declaration of independence
13 colonies, declare US as a free nation 1. Northern Europeans

2. Southern and Eastern Europeans

3. Hispanics, Asians and
Third World immigrants First wave They were protestants from Northern Europe
During the industrial revolution
Irish potato famine Found gold in California
The Chinese; the largest group to come to “Golden Mountain”. Gold Rush Exclusion Act Only allowed to own restaurants and laundries
Until 1943, Chinese immigration was very strictly regulated. Ellis Island, which opened in 1892
1920's Depression in Eastern and Southern Europe
*Over crowded
*Unemployment
*Illiterate
USA needed labour Second Wave World War 1 Increased immigrants from Europe to the US Year of depression More people emigrated than immigrated. Third Wave *Fled Nazi oppression
*Fled from communist countries were they had lived
*US was not drawn into the war yet
*USA needed more labour Immigrants Mexicans
Involvement in Cuba and Vietnam Third world countries

Refugees due to war and natural catastrophes Northern Europeans 1820 - 1890
European protestants
Industrial revolution

US needed labour
Push and pull effect Irish, Catholic, 1845 - 1855
The Blight, airborn fungus
Trade
Staple food
Enough production og wheat
Emigrate to England and The US
Religious freedom Discriminated like Chinese
"No Irish Need Apply"
Recognised Motivated
The Homestead Act 1862


British Isles, Germany, France
Norway, Gold Rush 1. Head of a family
2. Over the age of 21
3. Live in the US for five years,
and pay a registration fee First wave
Uncertain
Without knowing
Desperation
Pull effect the US had less labour and steam engine THANK YOU! OK, I want to talk about Ireland
Specifically I want to talk about the "famine"
About the fact that there never really was one
There was no "famine"
See Irish people were only allowed to eat potatoes
All of the other food
Meat fish vegetables
Were shipped out of the country under armed guard
To England while the Irish people starved
And then on the middle of all this
They gave us money not to teach our children Irish
And so we lost our history
And this is what I think is still hurting me

See we're like a child that's been battered
Has to drive itself out of it's head because it's frightened
Still feels all the painful feelings
But they lose contact with the memory

And this leads to massive self-destruction
alcoholism, drug adiction
All desperate attempts at running
And in it's worst form
Becomes actual killing

And if there ever is gonna be healing
There has to be remembering
And then grieving
So that there then can be forgiving
There has to be knowledge and understanding

All the lonely people
where do they all come from US immigration
Start with
Northern European Discuss the vikings
Southern European colonizations Sinead O'Connor
Full transcript