Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The British Empire

No description
by

Mrs Durcan-Smith

on 12 November 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The British Empire

The British Empire Know and understand what an empire is.
Know and understand why Britain wanted an empire. The Empire In 1750 the British Empire was expanding a number of colonies had been set up.
Between 1750 and 1875 the Empire grew slowly but during the next 25 years lands nearly 40 times the size of Britain were added to the Empire.
By the beginning of the 20th Century Britain ruled over 13million square miles of territory and about 370million people. The British Empire Trade
Religion
Land
Adventure
Ambition
Politics Stopping other European powers.
Wanting to learn about new things.
Trying to spread the faith.
Hoping to settle down.
Hoping to get rich easily.
Making money for Britain. Match Up Afghanistan
Australia
Bahamas
Barbados
Botswana
United States of America
Guyana
Canada
Sri Lanka
New Zealand Jamaica
Kenya
Kuwait
Malta
Nigeria
Zambia
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Singapore
South Africa Cyprus
Egypt
Fiji
Ghana
Israel
Iraq
Ireland Sudan
United Arab Emirates Hong Kong
India
Pakistan
Bangladesh Uganda Countries of the Empire Zimbabwe Why do you think Britain want to create such a big empire? Between 1750 and 1950 the British Empire expanded to cover ¼ of the Earth’s total land area and ruled ¼ of the world’s population.
At the peak of power it was often said:
‘The sun never sets on the British Empire’
Because its span across the globe ensured the sun was always shining on at least one of it’s territories. Growth of an Empire Fill in your Mindmap with the different reasons for growing an empire. The growth of industry and the growth of the Empire are linked by the need for foreign trade.
Sea-Power made Britain a trading nation well before 1750, raw materials such as cotton were brought to Britain, made into the finished product then sold abroad.
The colonies of the Empire played an important part in the trade cycle as they provided raw materials and the finished product was often sold there. Trade Many of the early settlers in the colonies went in search of land to settle down and enjoy a new life.
Many Britain’s went to Australia and America in search of cheap land on which to settle down. Land Britain was a very small country and as they were surrounded by water, they had less opportunity to build their Empire compared to the landlocked countries like Germany.
Britain wanted to build its Empires to stop other European countries from developing their own empires and becoming too powerful.
By creating a large Empire, Britain could have a power in world politics which they could not have had otherwise. Politics The people who went to the colonies were often encouraged by their need for adventure.
They wanted to learn about new lands and peoples and the colonies offered an opportunity to do that. Adventure Britain was a Christian country, and they felt that it was their duty to spread the Christian faith not just in Britain but abroad.
Christians traveled to countries like Africa and America to bring Christianity to the ‘godless’ people of the newly discovered lands.
These Christians were called missionaries as they felt they were following the mission of Jesus and the disciples. Religion As the Empire grew so did the number of British people who lived in the colonies. The Brit's in the colonies could expect greater luxury than they had at home.
Between 1800 and 1914 about 14million people emigrated from the UK to the colonies. The British who lived in the colonies were able to live in a class above themselves. Ambition Which do you think is the most important reason to grow an empire?
Give to reasons for your answer. The Great Exhibition Watch the video and see what you think The Great Exhibition might be. The Great Exhibition If you took a bus along London's Knightsbridge in the summer of 1851, you would see an astonishing sight. Glittering among the trees was a palace made of glass. It was as tall as the trees, Nothing like this had been seen in London, ever.
This was the ‘Crystal Palace’, home to the Great Exhibition, an idea dreamt up by Queen Victoria's husband, Prince Albert, to display the wonders of industry and manufacturing from around the modern world. Britain was at peace, England was experiencing a manufacturing boom. This was the time to show off, on the international stage. The Great Exhibition There were some 100,000 objects, displayed along more than ten miles, by over 15,000 contributors. Britain, as host, occupied half the display space inside, with exhibits from the home country and the Empire. The biggest of all was the massive hydraulic press, next in size was a steam-hammer, there were adding machines which might put bank clerks out of a job; a ‘stiletto or defensive umbrella’– always useful – and a ‘sportsman’s knife’ with eighty blades from Sheffield – not really so useful.
One of the upstairs galleries was walled with stained glass through which the sun streamed in technicolour. Almost as brilliantly coloured were carpets from Axminster and ribbons from Coventry. There was a printing machine and a useful pulpit connected to pews by rubber tubes so that the deaf could hear, and ‘tangible ink’ for the blind, producing raised characters on paper. The Great Exhibition A whole gallery was devoted to those elegant, sophisticated carriages that predated the motorcar, and if you looked carefully you could find one or two velocipedes, the early version of bicycles. There were printing presses and textile machines and agricultural machines. There were examples of every kind of steam engine, including the giant railway locomotive.
In short, as the Queen put it in her Diary, ‘every conceivable invention’.
Canada sent a fire-engine with painted panels showing Canadian scenes, and a trophy of furs. India contributed an elaborate throne of carved ivory, a coat embroidered with pearls, emeralds and rubies, and a magnificent howdah and trappings for a rajah’s elephant.
The American display was headed by a massive eagle, wings outstretched, holding a drapery of the Stars and Stripes, all poised over one of the organs scattered throughout the building.
The exhibit that attracted most attention had to be Hiram Power’s statue of a Greek Slave, in white marble, housed in her own little red velvet tent. The Great Exhibition The largest foreign contributor was France. She exhibited sumptuous tapestries, porcelain and silks , enamels and furniture.
The Russian exhibits included huge vases and urns made of, and furs and sledges and armour. Chile sent a single lump of gold weighing 50kg, Switzerland sent gold watches.
The famous fountain, in the middle of the building, was made of four tons of pink glass, 27 feet high, provided a useful meeting place, as well as cooling the atmosphere. There was a police desk for lost children and umbrellas. And for the first time ever, ‘waiting rooms and conveniences’ were provided, where you could by spending just one penny have the blessing of a private cubicle. The Great Exhibition Queen Victoria opened the Exhibition on 1st May, on schedule. She became a frequent visitor. At first the price of admission was £3 for gentlemen, £2 for ladies.
From 24th May the masses were let in for only a shilling a head. And they came in their thousands,. The travel agent Thomas Cook arranged special excursion trains. One old lady even walked, all the way from Penzance.
By the time the Exhibition closed, on 11th October, over six million people had gone through the turnstiles. Instead of the loss initially predicted, the Exhibition made a profit of £186,000, most of which was used to create the South Kensington museums. Write a speech for a British politician in 1851 explaining to the public at the Great Exhibition why Great Britain should want an empire. The British Empire Know and understand how big the British Empire was. Which Countries were in the British Empire?
The person with the most will get a prize. What reasons are acceptable for wanting an empire? Afghanistan
Australia
Bahamas
Barbados
Botswana
United States of America
Guyana
Canada
Sri Lanka
New Zealand Jamaica
Kenya
Kuwait
Malta
Nigeria
Zambia
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Singapore
South Africa Cyprus
Egypt
Fiji
Ghana
Israel
Iraq
Ireland Sudan
United Arab Emirates Hong Kong
India
Pakistan
Bangladesh Uganda Countries of the Empire Zimbabwe Using the Atlas colour in the countries of the British Empire on your world map in blue, red and white stripes and the rest of the countries another colour. Know and understand why the British Empire was so important. The British Empire You will be working in small groups on sheets
You will be given a pack of evidence numbered 1, 2, 3 or 4.
Find the question sheet that matches the number on your pack
I will set a timer to tell you how long you have with each pack of evidence.
Once the timer is up, you must stop, and pass the pack on. Task Mark out the trade routes in another colour pencil using the following table. Import Source Cotton
Textiles
Sugar
Wheat
Flour
Coffee

Tea
Tobacco
Fruit
Diamonds
Meat India
India
West Indies
Canada
Canada
South Africa and West Indies
India
West Indies
West Indies
Africa, India, Australia,
New Zealand and Australia Explain using specific examples the areas that were ruled by the British Empire.
Full transcript