Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

FOTOGRAFIA E ARQUIVO

No description
by

Ana Marta Caldeira

on 2 June 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of FOTOGRAFIA E ARQUIVO

FOTOGRAFIA E ARQUIVO RETRATO City of Shadows – Vintage Mug Shots Walter Smith glowers at us across the temporal void, from a police station somewhere in Sydney, Australia, 1924. His craggy face communicates much about the type of man he might be – the flinty eyes shadowed beneath a prominent brow, the nose ruined by fist, wood or brass, in the mouth the hint of a sneer. The record doesn’t say why Walter has been apprehended, leaving us to peer back at him through our prejudices and judge by his appearance alone. Was he a cruel, boorish oaf of a violent disposition? Or simply a victim of circumstance, who had suffered an unforgiving life, habitually in liquor, now standing in the lock-up because petty theft was the only option left open to him. If only he could speak to us now in his defense.Below is May Russell, also a mystery. Her appearance and demeanour arguably more striking than Smith’s by it’s contrast to his. A freckled, handsome if not attractive face, thin-lipped and frowning at her current predicament. May is slightly folorn in the accompanying full-length photo, clutching a handbag. Her smart, almost prim ensemble at odds with the stained, austere space. A middle-class kleptomaniac? Or a contemporary of Walter’s, employing a carefully constructed camouflage, her sole intent to defraud.Perhaps her story will eventually be revealed by “From the loft“, a new blog out of the Justice & Police Museum, NSW, Australia.These evocative images of May & Walter are just two from approx 2500 “special photographs” taken by New South Wales Police Department photographers between 1910 and 1930.“These “special photographs” were mostly taken in the cells at the Central Police Station, Sydney and are, as curator Peter Doyle explains, of “men and women recently plucked from the street, often still animated by the dramas surrounding their apprehension”. Doyle suggests that, compared with the subjects of prison mug shots, “the subjects of the Special Photographs seem to have been allowed – perhaps invited – to position and compose themselves for the camera as they liked. Their photographic identity thus seems constructed out of a potent alchemy of inborn disposition, personal history, learned habits and idiosyncrasies, chosen personal style (haircut, clothing, accessories) and physical characteristics.”"I’ll leave this photo alone to tell it’s own story. If you can suggest a possible matching scenario, email it to me and I will publish it at a later date.Alas, Smith and Jones: MUGSHOTS A wanted poster (or wanted sign) is a poster distributed to let the public know of an alleged criminal whom authorities wish to apprehend. They will generally include either a picture of the alleged criminal when a photograph is available, or of a facial composite image produced by a police artist. The poster will usually include a description of the wanted person(s) and the crime(s) for which they are sought. Wanted posters are usually produced by a police department or other public government body for display in a public place, such as on a physical bulletin board or in the lobby of a post office, but in ages past wanted posters have also been produced by vigilante groups, railway security, private agencies such as Pinkerton, or by express companies that have sustained a robbery. In 2007, the FBI began posting wanted posters on electronic billboards starting with 23 cities, and are working to expand this system in other states. This allows them to instantly post a wanted notice in public view across the US. The FBI claims at least 30 cases have been solved as a direct result of digital billboard publicity, and many others have been solved through the Bureau’s overall publicity efforts that included the billboards.[1]Wanted posters for particularly notorious fugitives frequently offer a bounty or reward for the capture of the person, or for a person who can provide information leading to such capture. More modern wanted posters may also include images of the fugitive's fingerprints.Composite images for use in wanted posters can be created with various methods, including:E-FIT: Electronic Facial Identification Technique via computerIdentikitPhotoFIT: Photographic Facial Identification Technique A mug shot, mugshot or booking photograph, is a photographic portrait taken after one is arrested.[1] The purpose of the mug shot is to allow law enforcement to have a photographic record of the arrested individual to allow for identification by victims and investigators. Most mug shots are two-part, with one side-view photo, and one front-view. They may be compiled into a mug book in order to determine the identity of a criminal. In high-profile cases mug shots may also be published by the media. HistoryThe mug shot was invented by Allan Pinkerton, a famous U.S. detective of the 19th Century. The Pinkerton National Detective Agency first began using these on Wanted posters from the Wild West days. By the 1870s the agency had amassed the largest collection of mug shots in the United States.[2] The paired arrangement may have been inspired by the 1865 prison portraits taken by Alexander Gardner of accused conspirators in the Lincoln assassination trial, though Gardner's photographs were full-body portraits with only the heads turned for the profile shots.Prior to the advent of computer technology, the accused were sometimes made to hold a placard with their name, date of birth, booking ID, weight and other relevant information on it. In recent years, digital photography is used for the booking process, and the accused is no longer asked to hold the card while the photo is taken. Rather, the digital photograph is linked to a database record concerning the arrest.EtymologyLook up mug shot in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.The term derives from mug, an English slang term for face, dating from the 18th century.[3]The phrase is also sometimes used to refer to any small picture of a face used for any other reason.Prejudicial natureBenito Mussolini's booking photograph from 1903The U.S. legal system has long held that mug shots can have a negative effect on juries. The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit held 'The double-shot picture, with front and profile shots alongside each other, is so familiar, from 'wanted' posters in the post office, motion pictures and television, that the inference that the person involved has a criminal record, or has at least been in trouble with the police, is natural, perhaps automatic.' [5] The Handbook of Massachusetts Evidence says "Because of the risk of prejudice to the defendant inherent in the admission of photographs of the 'mug shot' variety, judges and prosecutors are required to 'use reasonable means to avoid calling the jury's attention to the source of such photographs used to identify the defendant.' " (p.617) Elsewhere it cites a ruling in Commonwealth v. Martin "admission of a defendant's mug shot is 'laden for characterizing the defendant as a careerist in crime'" Other states have similar rules. [6][edit]Copyright statusFederal booking photographs are automatically entered into the public domain in the United States, and can be obtained by anyone through the Freedom of Information Act, except in special cases when the arrestees' record has been sealed. JOÃO PINA Portugal vê mostra fotográfica de ex-presos políticosPorto, 19 Abr (Lusa) - A cidade do Porto vai acolher, a partir de sábado, uma exposição do fotógrafo português João Pina, que reúne imagens de 25 ex-presos políticos portugueses, trabalho que posteriormente será editado em livro.Intitulada "Por teu livre pensamento, histórias de 25 presos políticos portugueses", a mostra agrupa fotos inéditas de ex-presos políticos na época em que foram presos e em situações de suas vidas atuais, disse à Agência Lusa Teresa Siza, diretora do Centro Português de Fotografia (CPF), que acolhe a exposição.Ao lado destas imagens, serão exibidas as fotos feitas pela polícia política portuguesa (Polícia Internacional e de Defesa do Estado - PIDE) para as fichas ou cadastros criminais, mostrando os detidos de frente e de perfil.Estas fotos são o resultado de um trabalho de pesquisa realizada pelo fotógrafo, cujo avô e avó foram presos políticos durante o regime ditatorial de Salazar e cujo bisavô tirou as fotografias oficiais do campo de concentração do Tarrafal, em Cabo Verde.Este trabalho fotográfico foi realizado para o livro "Por teu livre pensamento", que será também lançado neste sábado no CPF, cujo texto, constituído por entrevistas com os presos políticos, é da autoria de Rui Galiza.A apresentação da exposição está a cargo do presidente da Assembléia da República de Portugal, Jaime Gama, que também foi o autor do prefácio do livro do João Pina, editado pela Assírio & Alvim.João PinaNascido em Lisboa, em 1980, João Pina começou a trabalhar como fotógrafo aos 18 anos, publicando regularmente desde então.Em 2001, começou a documentar a vida de ex-presos políticos portugueses estendendo atualmente esse projeto à escala mundial.Em 1987 visitou Cuba pela primeira vez e, desde 2002, iniciou um projeto fotográfico no último regime comunista do mundo ocidental, para onde tem voltado com regularidade na esperança de ser um observador privilegiado das mudanças sócio-políticas que venham a acontecer.Desde 2004, após concluir o "One year certificate on Photojournalism and Documentary Photography" no International Center of Photography em Nova York, tem desenvolvido grande parte do seu trabalho em países da América Latina para onde planeja de mudar ainda durante este ano. Inmates at the notorious Tuol Sleng prison, where at least 14,000 people were tortured to death or sent to killing fields. NHEM ENPHNOM PENH, Cambodia, Oct. 25 — He had a job to do, and he did it supremely well, under threat of death, within earshot of screams of torture: methodically photographing Khmer Rouge prisoners and producing a haunting collection of mug shots that has become the visual symbol of Cambodia’s mass killings.RelatedView the Khmer Rouge photographs (TuolSleng.com) Back Story With Seth Mydans and Graham BowleyEnlarge This Image Tuol Sleng Museum of GenocideEnlarge This Image Tuol Sleng Museum of GenocideBefore killing the prisoners, the Khmer Rouge photographed, tortured and extracted written confessions from their victims.“I’m just a photographer; I don’t know anything,” he said he told the newly arrived prisoners as he removed their blindfolds and adjusted the angles of their heads. But he knew, as they did not, that every one of them would be killed.“I had my job, and I had to take care of my job,” he said in a recent interview. “Each of us had our own responsibilities. I wasn’t allowed to speak with prisoners.”That was three decades ago, when the photographer, Nhem En, now 47, was on the staff of Tuol Sleng prison, the most notorious torture house of the Khmer Rouge regime, which caused the deaths of 1.7 million people from 1975 to 1979.This week he was called to be a witness at a coming trial of Khmer Rouge leaders, including his commandant at the prison, Kaing Geuk Eav, known as Duch, who has been arrested and charged with crimes against humanity.The trial is still months away, but prosecutors are interviewing witnesses, reviewing tens of thousands of pages of documents and making arrests.As a lower-ranking cadre at the time, Mr. Nhem En is not in jeopardy of arrest. But he is in a position to offer some of the most personal testimony at the trial about the man he worked under for three years.In the interview, Mr. Nhem En spoke with pride of living up to the exacting standards of a boss who was a master of negative reinforcement.“It was really hard, my job,” he said. “I had to clean, develop and dry the pictures on my own and take them to Duch by my own hand. I couldn’t make a mistake. If one of the pictures was lost I would be killed.”But he said: “Duch liked me because I’m clean and I’m organized. He gave me a Rolex watch.”Fleeing with other Khmer Rouge cadres when the government was ousted by a Vietnamese invasion in 1979, Mr. Nhem En said he traded that watch for 20 tins of milled rice.Since then he has adapted and prospered and is now a deputy mayor of the former Khmer Rouge stronghold Anlong Veng. He has switched from an opposition party to the party of Prime Minister Hun Sen, and today he wears a wristwatch that bears twin portraits of the prime minister and his wife, Bun Rany.Last month an international tribunal arrested and charged a second Khmer Rouge figure, who is now being held with Duch in a detention center. He is Nuon Chea, 82, the movement’s chief ideologue and a right-hand man to the Khmer Rouge leader, Pol Pot, who died in 1998.Three more leaders were expected to be arrested in the coming weeks: the urbane former Khmer Rouge head of state, Khieu Samphan, along with the former foreign minister, Ieng Sary, and his wife and fellow central committee member, Ieng Thirith.All will benefit from the caprice of Mr. Nuon Chea, who complained that the squat toilet in his cell was hurting his ailing knees and was given a sit-down toilet.Similar toilets are being installed in the other cells, said a tribunal spokesman, Reach Sambath, “So they will all enjoy high-standard toilets when they come.”It is not clear whether any of the cases will be combined. But even if the defendants do not see one another, their testimony, harmonious or discordant, will put on display the relationships of some of the people who once ran the country’s killing machine.In a 1999 interview, Duch implicated his fellow prisoner, Mr. Nuon Chea, in the killings, citing among other things a directive that said, “Kill them all.”Mr. Nhem En’s career in the Khmer Rouge began in 1970 at age 9 when he was recruited as a village boy to be a drummer in a touring revolutionary band. When he was 16, he said, he was sent to China for a seven-month course in photography.He became the chief of six photographers at Tuol Sleng, where at least 14,000 people were tortured to death or sent to killing fields. Only a half dozen inmates were known to have survived.He was a craftsman, and some of his portraits, carefully posed and lighted, have found their way into art galleries in the United States.Hundreds of them hang in rows on the walls of Tuol Sleng, which is now a museum, their fixed stares tempting a visitor to search for meaning here on the cusp of death. In fact, they are staring at Mr. Nhem En.The job was a daily grind, he said: up at 6:30 a.m., a quick communal meal of bread or rice and something sweet, and at his post by 7 a.m. to wait for prisoners to arrive. His telephone would ring to announce them: sometimes one, sometimes a group, sometimes truckloads of them, he said.“They came in blindfolded, and I had to untie the cloth,” he said.“I was alone in the room, so I am the one they saw. They would say, ‘Why was I brought here? What am I accused of? What did I do wrong?’”But Mr. Nhem En ignored them.“‘Look straight ahead. Don’t lean your head to the left or the right.’ That’s all I said,” he recalled. “I had to say that so the picture would turn out well. Then they were taken to the interrogation center. The duty of the photographer was just to take the picture.” NHEM EN 'He photographed family and friends, and asked them to look completely blank and expressionless... ' Thomas Ruff Portrait ANDY WARHOL 13 Most Wanted Men FRANCIS GALTON«Composite-Fotografie»Beginning 1877, Francis Galton worked with the process of composite photography to verify and illustrate his study of heredity. This involved exposing an arbitrary number of individual portraits of chosen groups of people on a photographic plate, with the respective exposure time for each image made in relation to the number of used portraits. The overlapping caused the subjects’ individual physiognomic qualities to vanish and accentuated common characteristics of the chosen group. The composite process resulted in producing a slightly blurred image, which, as Galton wrote, «portrayed no specific type of person, but rather an imaginary figure endowed with the average characteristics of a specific group of people. [...] [This] represents the portrait of a type and not of an individual.» Galton’s process was founded on the physiognomic idea that a person’s character and potential could be established through appearance alone. The example shown here – the synthesis of the ‹epitomic Jew,› and the intensification of an archive to a single image – demonstrates the most dangerous effects that combining eugenics with composite photography produces. FRANCIS GALTON BERTILLONAlphonse Bertillon (April 24, 1853 – February 13, 1914) was a French police officer and biometrics researcher who created anthropometry, an identification system based on physical measurements. Anthropometry was the first scientific system used by police to identify criminals. Before that time, criminals could only be identified based on unreliable eyewitness accounts. The method was eventually supplanted by fingerprinting, but "his other contributions like the mug shot and the systematisation of crime-scene photography remain in place to this day.""Every measurement slowly reveals the workings of the criminal. Careful observation and patience will reveal the truth."Alphonse Bertillon, French criminologist BERTILLON Having made illegal street art for years without being caught I’d started to forget that it was a crime. So when I was finally arrested I began to think more seriously about its criminality. This interest grew into a ‘side project’ which quickly blew out into the largest street art campaign I’ve undertaken.

I started by searching through the police documents at the South Australian State Records. The photography of the early 1920s stood out immediately for its technical qualities so I narrowed my search to the record GRG5/58/unit103.

I began selecting criminal’s mug shots based mostly on the immediate impact of the image. Whether through their defiant pride, amused irreverence or shamed humiliation some faces drew me in and those where the ones I chose. I was also attracted by the more innocuous offences, especially those that have since been decriminalised. Judging by their expression, the dubious offence of ‘idle and disorderly’ seemed as laughable then as it does now. Likewise, the supposed ‘offence’ of ‘attempted suicide’ or ‘sodomy’ seemed to confuse the convicted as much as their criminal classification offends us today.

By evoking the power of nostalgia and the notion of historic value I knew I could use these images to confront the idea of the criminal as an outsider, especially in the context of street art as a criminal act.

I began pasting up the posters at night before I realised it would be much safer during the day dressed as a legitimate worker. This approach also seemed more fitting to the theme of questioning the criminality of street art. So when I donned the high vis vest and went about my business I didn’t feel like a criminal, I felt as thought I was performing a public good.

Each paste up stood 2.5 meters tall and included the criminal’s full name, conviction, sentence and date. Overall I pasted up 42 individual mug shots (21 sets of 2) to the cost of AU$1170 in printing alone. The project was entirely self funded.

Eventually I was contacted by the Adelaide City Council and I admitted the posters were mine. The council agreed to stop removing the posters if I would take steps to legitimise the whole project through their ‘pilot project’ scheme. So I filled in an application, promising to track down every property owner and request permission to do what I’d already done (still in progress). I was also told I would have to remove the criminals surnames so not to connect surviving relatives to their criminal past. I’ve since been contacted by several relatives who actually enjoyed connecting the dots and were very encouraging towards the project as a whole.

Despite these obstacles I was very pleased by Adelaide City Council’s allowing the images to stay on the street long enough to be seen by the public for whom they were intended. I hope their open mindedness can extend towards the work of other artists. Adelaide´s Forgotten Outlaws Andy Warhol: Time Capsules
Featured in: Artists Who Collect
The Time Capsules are Warhol’s largest collecting project, in which he saved source material for his work and an enormous record of his own daily life. Warhol began creating his Time Capsules in 1974 after relocating his studio. He recognized that cardboard boxes used in the move were an efficient method for dealing with all of his “stuff.” Warhol selected items from the daily flood of correspondence, magazines, newspapers, gifts, photographs, business records, and material that passed through his hands to put in the open box by his desk. Once the box was full he sealed it with tape, marked it with a date or title, and put it in his archive. Collectively, this material provides a unique view into Warhol’s private world, as well as a broad cultural backdrop illustrating the social and artistic scene during his lifetime. From the early ’70s until his death in 1987, Warhol created 612 finished Time Capsules.

During this time period he was not only incredibly busy making art, but he was also collecting everything from cookie jars to contemporary art. An obsessive collector, Warhol constantly scoured auction houses, antique stores, and particularly flea markets for new treasures to add to his many collections. Warhol collected Fiestaware, World's Fair memorabilia, Art Deco silver, Native American objects, and folk art. He often acquired large collections as well—Hollywood publicity stills, crime scene photographs, and dental molds. All of these activities reflected his interest in Pop Art and his inspiration: consumer culture.

Andy Warhol’s Time Capsules were almost completely unknown until his death in 1987. Although various studio assistants frequently handled the boxes over the years, few people seemed to recognize the enormous mass of material as anything other than “Andy’s stuff.” With the opening of The Andy Warhol Museum in 1994, the Time Capsules became accessible to curators, scholars, and the general public, revealing new and important information about Warhol’s life and expanding the public’s understanding of his work and practice. Andy Warhol: Time Capsules Time Capsule 232 Arquivo - Colecção de documentos gerado por uma pessoa em particular, uma familia, ou uma organização durante as suas actividades, em que foram escolhidas pela sua permanência.

- Arquivar é armazenar algo num lugar ou numa colecção seja fisica ou digital. The archaeology of photography: rereading Michel Foucault and thearchaeology of knowledge.
By David Bate | Nov-Dec, 2007Afterimage
The French historian of discourse, Michel Foucault, made a clear distinction between the "archive" and the method that hedescribes as archaeological. While this method does not require a trowel to dig through the earth, the metaphor of diggingprovides a valuable image of what the historical researcher needs to do. For Foucault, the historian must excavate an archiveto reveal not merely what is in it, but the very conditions that have made that archive possible, what he calls its historical apriori. (1) This historical a priori is the "condition of reality for statements," the rules that characterize any discursive practice.Thus, the archive in Foucault's work is nothing so literal as rows of dusty shelves in a particular institution, but rather involvesthe whole system or apparatus that enables such artifacts to exist (including the actual institutional building itself). In thismodel, the "archive" is already a construct, a corpus that is the product of a discourse. One must dig to make sense of thesystems behind what one sees.In fact, Foucault's argument is based on the semiotic distinction between langue and parole in linguistics. The linguisticopposition langue and parole (grammar and speech) is used to demonstrate how any utterance is always a symptom of thesystem that allows it to exist. In this conception, any act of speech (parole) is a specific instance, an event, that gives evidenceof the rules of grammar (langue), the abstract set of rules about language through which that event is allowed its form; a form,which of course, over time, can be reformed or changed. For Foucault then, any archive is an instance of parole, where onecan deconstruct the rules of the "language" (langue) that underpins it. The use of this theory by Foucault to construct a modelof thinking about the archaeology of knowledge has important consequences for the field of photography and the notion of thearchive.In the first instance, the idea of photography as a type of "archive" has been around since the early days of photography.Whether it was (or is) an institution that wants to categorize its objects through photographs (e.g., criminals by the police,military and colonial campaigns mapping land, a museum its artifacts, a family through its "album") or whether it is individualphotographers who construct a taxonomy of objects through their photographs (e.g., John Thomson's Street Life of London,Eugene Atget's Paris photographs, August Sander's People of the Twentieth Century in Germany, Phillip-Lorca diCorcia'sHeads, to name only a few), the aim is always the same: to provide a corpus of images that represent--and can be consultedabout--a specific object. This means that photographs are almost always to be found within the conception of practice as an"archive."Everywhere around us, it seems, there are new digital photographic archives being constructed: cctv control centres, thevarious types of people-based "democratic" Web sites like Flickr and YouTube, millions of cell phone camera memory cards,and personal computer hard disks--not to mention the many vast commercial and governmental computer data image files. Allthese new archives, with their taxonomic "tab" and keyword search finder systems, insinuate the archive as an expanded fieldof cultural activity whose horizons appear more infinite day by day. For all these reasons, the "archive" is a central concept inthe arsenal of cultural knowledge.So the idea of photography as an archive (an archival practice) is not so abstract or strange and not limited to the province of curators, academics, museum researchers, or picture agents. The archive is a crucial basic tool of "cultural intermediaries,"picture researchers, editors, and agents, etc., where finding and naming something is an essential aspect of daily work, aneveryday problematic. We might say the same applies to photographers as well, be they stock library photographers, artphotographers, or even amateurs: the taxonomy of "objects, things, and people" that are photographed have the issue of thearchive in common. It might be thought then that the problems encountered--if not the actual situations--are similar for gallerycurators just as much as they are for a photographer setting out to make some "work." The production, filing, and storage of images in archives within categories as well as the occasional configuration (selection) from these archive materials intoexhibitions thus demands an approach to how we use them and this is where Foucault's concept of archaeology might beuseful.[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]Now, while it is typically the task of the historian (or even photographer) to use the archive to explain an object (past or present), Foucault challenges that practice. He argues first that archives are not necessarily coherent (historians often make itappear that way by the first choices--the process of decision-making--they make in their work); and, second, "interpreting" anarchive is a project that already implicitly accepts the underlying terms of the system. The archive "reveals the rules of a


practice." (2) Instead, Foucault, like an archaeologist, proposes that objects and documents can be examined for what theyreveal about a discourse. To this end, he is not, unlike the antiquarian, concerned with the provenance of objects: who madewhat, how, and where. To Foucault, it is more important for the archaeologist to search for the regular features of objects intheir appearance, "the regularity of statements," which in fact constitute the discourse of any discursive practice. (3) From allthis emerges a very different attitude whereby one is more concerned with the raw materials (the archaeological evidence fromwhich descriptions are constructed) than with the "accumulation of fact" (the repository of the past itself).In Foucault's "archaeology of knowledge," objects, documents, images, and representations are so many parts of what makeup a discourse--not the other way around as is commonly conceived. A discourse is not the base for other knowledge. Rather,it is itself the site of how knowledge comes to be constituted. In other words, archives of photographs do not reflect historicalreality; they are the material, always incomplete, which form the "already-said," the basic construction of its description.Foucault, with his concept of the archaeology of knowledge, specifically resituates the work of history (his book is about hisown work, archaeology rather than history or the "history of ideas") as the work of discourse theory. Foucault argues four mainaspects to this work: the emergence of a discourse; its sustainability despite certain contradictions; the comparison of differentdiscursive practices; and the analysis of change and transformation in a discursive practice. From this rather abstract startingpoint in discourse theory, one can begin to define and determine how to conceptualize the archaeology of photography.I want to indicate some of the implications of this idea for the field of photography in approaches to history and photographicpractice. First, an archaeology of photography would be different from the history of photography. The history of photography,as it is most often practiced, relies on identifying originality, naming authors, and their works and themes that contributesomething "new." Genius, influence, and the extraordinary are key themes selected to represent the development of photography in a general history of photography--where the subject matter of photographs is often subservient to thosecategories. Typical narratives in the history of photography, for example, include where to situate its invention: in either Englandor France, posing the question of identifying the true inventor: William Henry Fox Talbot or Louis Daguerre? (A question aboutas important as the one asking how many angels can gather on the head of a pin.) An archaeology of photography would beless preoccupied with the individual rivalry between such figures, or the specific personal wishes of specific individuals "tophotograph" (a history through "psycho-biography," which denies social levels of analysis) than with the issue of where andwhy it emerged as it did, what the photography was used for, and what regular objects appear across the surfaces of all thesephotographs.[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]It is here that, for example, we would quickly regard the "surfaces of emergence" of photography in the nineteenth century asalong a fault line between "art" and "science." Art and science were two conflicting categories during the social and politicalrevolution of industrialization. Art and artisan methods of production and purpose were challenged by the innovation of industrial processes such as photography. Science, as a realm of rational knowledge, became inextricably linked with thesphere of the "entrepreneur," where discerning "amateurs" (like Daguerre or Fox Talbot) could begin to capitalize on their invention as an industry. And so it was that the industrial revolution, via capitalism, changed the whole society, including thesocial and cultural relations of producers of commodities (e.g., agriculture, clothing, food, the picture-making industries) and therelations between people within communities--how they lived and how they were literally perceived. Industrialism and thespecialisms of the new industrial world demanded that the status of the artist/artisan and the scientist/entrepreneur overlap innew ways because of the skills that new technologies demanded. This "crisis" in each category, art and science, is stillmanifest today among those who find it is impossible, even now (among photographers as much as historians and critics), tofinally "decide" whether photography is an art or science. The opposition (though not a distinction) between art and sciencewas obsolete, in that "photography" in fact demanded a combination of both; it was media. Indeed, it might be said that one keyfailure of the history of photography has been its inability to recognize how far the emergent uses of photography wereinstrumental in the very mutation of the existing fields of art and science. Photography was, in this respect, crucial to theappearance of a whole new domain that, throughout the twentieth century, emerged and became unified as the new mediainstitutions and agencies--where both art and science were implicated and acknowledged The archaeology of photography: rereading Michel Foucault and thearchaeology of knowledge.
By David Bate | Nov-Dec, 2007Afterimage
The French historian of discourse, Michel Foucault, made a clear distinction between the "archive" and the method that hedescribes as archaeological. While this method does not require a trowel to dig through the earth, the metaphor of diggingprovides a valuable image of what the historical researcher needs to do. For Foucault, the historian must excavate an archiveto reveal not merely what is in it, but the very conditions that have made that archive possible, what he calls its historical apriori. (1) This historical a priori is the "condition of reality for statements," the rules that characterize any discursive practice.Thus, the archive in Foucault's work is nothing so literal as rows of dusty shelves in a particular institution, but rather involvesthe whole system or apparatus that enables such artifacts to exist (including the actual institutional building itself). In thismodel, the "archive" is already a construct, a corpus that is the product of a discourse. One must dig to make sense of thesystems behind what one sees.In fact, Foucault's argument is based on the semiotic distinction between langue and parole in linguistics. The linguisticopposition langue and parole (grammar and speech) is used to demonstrate how any utterance is always a symptom of thesystem that allows it to exist. In this conception, any act of speech (parole) is a specific instance, an event, that gives evidenceof the rules of grammar (langue), the abstract set of rules about language through which that event is allowed its form; a form,which of course, over time, can be reformed or changed. For Foucault then, any archive is an instance of parole, where onecan deconstruct the rules of the "language" (langue) that underpins it. The use of this theory by Foucault to construct a modelof thinking about the archaeology of knowledge has important consequences for the field of photography and the notion of thearchive.In the first instance, the idea of photography as a type of "archive" has been around since the early days of photography.Whether it was (or is) an institution that wants to categorize its objects through photographs (e.g., criminals by the police,military and colonial campaigns mapping land, a museum its artifacts, a family through its "album") or whether it is individualphotographers who construct a taxonomy of objects through their photographs (e.g., John Thomson's Street Life of London,Eugene Atget's Paris photographs, August Sander's People of the Twentieth Century in Germany, Phillip-Lorca diCorcia'sHeads, to name only a few), the aim is always the same: to provide a corpus of images that represent--and can be consultedabout--a specific object. This means that photographs are almost always to be found within the conception of practice as an"archive."Everywhere around us, it seems, there are new digital photographic archives being constructed: cctv control centres, thevarious types of people-based "democratic" Web sites like Flickr and YouTube, millions of cell phone camera memory cards,and personal computer hard disks--not to mention the many vast commercial and governmental computer data image files. Allthese new archives, with their taxonomic "tab" and keyword search finder systems, insinuate the archive as an expanded fieldof cultural activity whose horizons appear more infinite day by day. For all these reasons, the "archive" is a central concept inthe arsenal of cultural knowledge.So the idea of photography as an archive (an archival practice) is not so abstract or strange and not limited to the province of curators, academics, museum researchers, or picture agents. The archive is a crucial basic tool of "cultural intermediaries,"picture researchers, editors, and agents, etc., where finding and naming something is an essential aspect of daily work, aneveryday problematic. We might say the same applies to photographers as well, be they stock library photographers, artphotographers, or even amateurs: the taxonomy of "objects, things, and people" that are photographed have the issue of thearchive in common. It might be thought then that the problems encountered--if not the actual situations--are similar for gallerycurators just as much as they are for a photographer setting out to make some "work." The production, filing, and storage of images in archives within categories as well as the occasional configuration (selection) from these archive materials intoexhibitions thus demands an approach to how we use them and this is where Foucault's concept of archaeology might beuseful.[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]Now, while it is typically the task of the historian (or even photographer) to use the archive to explain an object (past or present), Foucault challenges that practice. He argues first that archives are not necessarily coherent (historians often make itappear that way by the first choices--the process of decision-making--they make in their work); and, second, "interpreting" anarchive is a project that already implicitly accepts the underlying terms of the system. The archive "reveals the rules of a


practice." (2) Instead, Foucault, like an archaeologist, proposes that objects and documents can be examined for what theyreveal about a discourse. To this end, he is not, unlike the antiquarian, concerned with the provenance of objects: who madewhat, how, and where. To Foucault, it is more important for the archaeologist to search for the regular features of objects intheir appearance, "the regularity of statements," which in fact constitute the discourse of any discursive practice. (3) From allthis emerges a very different attitude whereby one is more concerned with the raw materials (the archaeological evidence fromwhich descriptions are constructed) than with the "accumulation of fact" (the repository of the past itself).In Foucault's "archaeology of knowledge," objects, documents, images, and representations are so many parts of what makeup a discourse--not the other way around as is commonly conceived. A discourse is not the base for other knowledge. Rather,it is itself the site of how knowledge comes to be constituted. In other words, archives of photographs do not reflect historicalreality; they are the material, always incomplete, which form the "already-said," the basic construction of its description.Foucault, with his concept of the archaeology of knowledge, specifically resituates the work of history (his book is about hisown work, archaeology rather than history or the "history of ideas") as the work of discourse theory. Foucault argues four mainaspects to this work: the emergence of a discourse; its sustainability despite certain contradictions; the comparison of differentdiscursive practices; and the analysis of change and transformation in a discursive practice. From this rather abstract startingpoint in discourse theory, one can begin to define and determine how to conceptualize the archaeology of photography.I want to indicate some of the implications of this idea for the field of photography in approaches to history and photographicpractice. First, an archaeology of photography would be different from the history of photography. The history of photography,as it is most often practiced, relies on identifying originality, naming authors, and their works and themes that contributesomething "new." Genius, influence, and the extraordinary are key themes selected to represent the development of photography in a general history of photography--where the subject matter of photographs is often subservient to thosecategories. Typical narratives in the history of photography, for example, include where to situate its invention: in either Englandor France, posing the question of identifying the true inventor: William Henry Fox Talbot or Louis Daguerre? (A question aboutas important as the one asking how many angels can gather on the head of a pin.) An archaeology of photography would beless preoccupied with the individual rivalry between such figures, or the specific personal wishes of specific individuals "tophotograph" (a history through "psycho-biography," which denies social levels of analysis) than with the issue of where andwhy it emerged as it did, what the photography was used for, and what regular objects appear across the surfaces of all thesephotographs.[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]It is here that, for example, we would quickly regard the "surfaces of emergence" of photography in the nineteenth century asalong a fault line between "art" and "science." Art and science were two conflicting categories during the social and politicalrevolution of industrialization. Art and artisan methods of production and purpose were challenged by the innovation of industrial processes such as photography. Science, as a realm of rational knowledge, became inextricably linked with thesphere of the "entrepreneur," where discerning "amateurs" (like Daguerre or Fox Talbot) could begin to capitalize on their invention as an industry. And so it was that the industrial revolution, via capitalism, changed the whole society, including thesocial and cultural relations of producers of commodities (e.g., agriculture, clothing, food, the picture-making industries) and therelations between people within communities--how they lived and how they were literally perceived. Industrialism and thespecialisms of the new industrial world demanded that the status of the artist/artisan and the scientist/entrepreneur overlap innew ways because of the skills that new technologies demanded. This "crisis" in each category, art and science, is stillmanifest today among those who find it is impossible, even now (among photographers as much as historians and critics), tofinally "decide" whether photography is an art or science. The opposition (though not a distinction) between art and sciencewas obsolete, in that "photography" in fact demanded a combination of both; it was media. Indeed, it might be said that one keyfailure of the history of photography has been its inability to recognize how far the emergent uses of photography wereinstrumental in the very mutation of the existing fields of art and science. Photography was, in this respect, crucial to theappearance of a whole new domain that, throughout the twentieth century, emerged and became unified as the new mediainstitutions and agencies--where both art and science were implicated and acknowledged

http://pt.scribd.com/doc/59183356/Rereading-Michel-Foucault-and-the-Archaeology-of-Knowledge-Printable David Bate - A quem pertence?
- Como apareceu?
- As condições da sua existência
- "o inconsciente do arquivo, as suas particularidades, a sua inconstancia, as exclusões. Ao estudar um Arquivo Fotográfico devemos ter em consideração David Bate faz uma distinção linguistica entre a estrutura e o conteúdo comparando com as abordagens "históricas" e "arquelógicas" Abordagem Histórica - Genialidade
- Influência
- Extraordinário Abordagem Arqueológica - Onde e Porquê que surgiu?
- Para quê que as imagens foram utilizadas
- Que objectos mais frequentes aparecem "A Arte pode ser um espaço para examinar significados e implicações no Arquivo, invés de tornar só as imagens em Obras de Arte."
David Campany Campany, David, Arte and Photography (Themes & Movements, Phaidon Press, 2003 Bibliografia Os Arquivos podem ser utilizados

1- Pesquisa, comparação, representação de imagens

2- Recreação de imagens de Arquivo para aludir a uma construção de Conhecimento

3- Explorar as inter-relações da História Colectiva e Memória Privada ATLAS August Sander: People of the 20th Century
«Atlas» is an ongoing, encyclopedic work composed of approximately 4,000 photographs, reproductions or cut-out details of photographs and illustrations, grouped together on approximately 600 separate panels. The images closely parallel, year by year, the subjects of Richter's paintings, revealing the orderly but open-ended analysis central to his art. Gerhard Richter «Atlas» For 140 years Consett in County Durham was synonymous with the production of iron and steel. Then in 1980, the steelworks was shut and subsequently dismantled by the largest demolition project in Europe. Germain uses his and other photographs (most notably Tommy Harris’s pictures made for the local newspaper, as well as family snapshots) to give an account of Consett. ‘Steel Works’ examines the social impact of a major industrial closure and evokes the broader social changes of the 1980’s – Thatcher’s Britain – when communities that had been shaped by industrial processes which offered jobs and identity were threatened by a new culture of economic expediency.
From ‘Steel Works. Consett, from steel to tortilla chips’, Why Not Publishing, 1990.

“Unlike in the family snaps and in Tommy Harris’s local press photos, Germain’s subjects rarely look you in the eye. Brassy colours conceal emptiness and would seem to urge temporary gratification. Colour-gloss itself becomes Germain’s metaphor for what has been sacrificed in moving from a black-and-white world to a full colour one. And the result is that there is nothing left of the naïvity and hopeful enthusiasm which shouts from every picture Tommy Harris ever took. Germain’s gaudy colours alert us to the ‘esprit de corps’ and deep personal bonds that have vanished and for whose loss the steelworks closure is only a symbol” David Lee, from the introduction of ‘Steel Works. Consett, from steel to tortilla chips’, Why Not Publishing, 1990. Steel works, 1986 - 1990 Julian Germain http://www.gerhard-richter.com/videos/exhibitions-1/gerhard-richter-atlas-54 video http://www.gerhard-richter.com/art/atlas/atlas.php?11581 trabalho completo Nancy Burson Walker Evans Eugène Atget Fotografia Vernacular A fotografia de carácter amador, encontrada no nosso arquivo pessoal e nos álbuns de família.

Tirada sem a intenção de ser mostrada ao público geral.

O autor da fotografia é quase sempre desconhecido.

É uma forma de documentação íntima que não sai do círculo familiar.

Permite uma sensação de identificação e relação com o outro Arquivos Institucionais Arquivos Artísticos Andy Warhol: Time Capsules Arquivos Fotográficos -Casa George Eastman, Museu Internacional da Fotografia e do Filme, NY

- Albert Kahn Museum

- Arquivo Municipal de Lisboa

- Museu Vicentes do Funchal

- Arquivo Municipal da Câmara Municipal de Évora

- Casa-Estúdio Carlos Relvas Grande Atlas dos Edifícios Destruídos Revista Punkto Jardins Suspensos da Babilónia
600 A.C – 200 A.C
Destruído por sismos World Trade Center
1971 – 2001
Nova Iorque
Destruído no ataque terrorista de 11/9 Budas de Bamiyán
Século VI – 2001
Afeganistão
Destruídos pelo regime Talibã Farol de Alexandria
280 A.C. – 1323
Destruído por sismos The Atlas Group (1989-2004). A Project by Walid Raad
By Kassandra Nakas | September 2006

Existing since 1999, The Atlas Group participated in major international exhibitions like the Documenta 11 and the Whitney Biennial 2002, which has made some of its works known to a broader public. In shifting constellations within the Atlas Group collective, Walid Raad (born in 1967 in Chbanieh, Lebanon), who founded the project, has created a complex of works with an abstracting/reducing aesthetic that raises many-layered questions about themes like experience and memory, authenticity and authorship, and how history can be depicted.

The exhibition "The Atlas Group (1989-2004). A Project by Walid Raad" in the Nationalgalerie im Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin is showing the most extensive overview yet on this project.[1] The years given in the exhibition title signal a temporal closure that, like most factual information in the context of The Atlas Group, should not be understood literally, but rather put in doubt. The Atlas Group set itself the goal of documenting and researching the present and history of Lebanon, in particular the years of the Lebanese Civil War (1975-1990/91), so its theme is also always the continuing effect of all the individual and collective experience that constitutes history in the first place.[2] The archive set up by The Atlas Group brings together not only found, but also intentionally invented photographic, audiovisual, and written "documents" of everyday life in Lebanon.[3]

From the collection of photographs, the Berlin exhibition presents a selection from eight series, supplemented by five video works. All these "documents" are accompanied by entries from the archives that provide supposed insight into who originated them, how they were created, and how they came into the archive’s possession.[4] For example, the notebooks, photographs, and 8-mm films from the estate of the (fictional) Lebanese historian, Dr. Fadl Fakhouri, found their way into the archive. The film "Miraculous Beginnings" was made on Dr. Fakhouri’s wanderings through Beirut. Whenever he thought the civil war was over, he took a picture. Since the history of the Lebanese civil war was long and characterized by numerous ceasefires and re-igniting battles between armies and militias, the film testifies to the lasting hope for peace and normality and the will to capture these hopeful moments in pictures, in the awareness of their transience. The film "No, illness is neither here nor there" similarly abstractly conveys a feeling for everyday life during war, which is shaped by violence, since it shows in rapid montage a huge number of advertising signs for surgeons, psychiatrists, and orthopedic specialists – fields that apparently flourish in wartime.

While most of these archive materials have a seemingly private character, the 100 black-and-white photographs from the series "My neck is thinner than a hair: Engines" come from Beirut documentation centers. They show the motors propelled out of their vehicles, which, as is widely known, took on a new function as weapons in the civil war. After the car bombs detonated, only the motors remained as whole, visible remnants – isolated (and thus abstract) testimonies to powerful explosions. Though almost all the pictorial and text material in the Atlas Group Archive concentrates on the time of the civil war, violence and fright are thereby never explicitly depicted, but always as "absent" and yet present as a reality deeply shaping daily life. The effects of the daily, unimaginable cruelties of the civil war are reflected not least in strangely distorted, "perverted" behavior patterns, for example the "race", described in the text accompanying the work, of the war correspondents to be the first to find and photograph the motors catapulted hundreds of meters from the sites of the car bomb detonations.

Another photo work from the "Fakhouri File" testifies to similarly twisted patterns of perception and depiction. "Notebook volume 72: Missing Lebanese Wars" portrays the Sunday outings to the horse races taken by Lebanese historians of various religions and political convictions. There they don’t bet on the winning horse, but on the temporal difference between the winner’s passing the goal line and the photograph of this moment by the racetrack photographer. The bet is won by whoever most precisely predicted the temporal difference, the photographer’s "error". This work focuses on the professional work of historians – of the "experts" for determining and depicting history – and thematizes the expressive power of the photographic image and its susceptibility to manipulation by the historians (some of whom bribe the photographers!), and its title also evokes the various implications of the word "missing" – failure to achieve, lack, but also longing for; so this creation can be understood as a key work of The Atlas Group.

The video "Hostage: The Bachar Tapes (#17 and #31)_English version" makes explicit reference to political history. At the center here is the (fictional) Lebanese hostage Souheil Bachar. Bachar describes the three months as a hostage he shared with five Americans, whose imprisonment and release in the mid-1980s stood partially in connection with high-level political events, like the Iran-Contra Affair. Their stories are well known through Western media reports and the books they wrote after their captivity, but "Hostage" in turn is an attempt to reveal the "blind spot" of a Western-dominated media representation.[5] In the series "We decided to let them say, ‘we are convinced,’ twice." the exhibition visitor is finally confronted with images of the Israeli invasion in Beirut in 1982. Five years ago, Walid Raad gave the archive these photographs, which he took in his youth. They are images frighteningly similar to the most recent reports from his homeland; their near-indistinguishability does not so much narrate the return of history as its stubborn continuation.

Notes:

A catalog, "The Atlas Group (1989-2004). A Project by Walid Raad" appeared for the exhibition. Exh.cat. Nationalgalerie im Hamburger Bahnhof, Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin 2006. Eds. Kassandra Nakas and Britta Schmitz. Cologne 2006.
The Atlas Group issues books on the archive’s inventory, in the sense of a continuing project. Thus far, the following have appeared: The Atlas Group and Walid Raad: The Truth Will Be Known When The Last Witness Is Dead. Documents from the Fakhouri File in the Atlas Group Archive. Vol. I. Cologne 2004; The Atlas Group and Walid Raad: My Neck Is Thinner Than A Hair. Documents from the Atlas Group Archive. Vol. II. Cologne 2005; see also the website of The Atlas Group: www.theatlasgroup.org
Walid Raad is also a member of the Fondation Arabe pour l’image (FAI), which was founded in Beirut in 1996 and collects and exhibits photographic testimony from the Arab world; cf. www.fai.org.lb. The Atlas Group Archive’s fictional character makes it a kind of counter-archive to the FAI.
This accompanying information is the basis for the performances that Walid Raad gives in the form of "lectures"; on this, cf. the contribution by André Lepecki in: "The Atlas Group (1989-2004). A Project by Walid Raad" (as in FN 1), p. 61-65.
On this, cf. Regina Göckede: Zweifelhafte Dokumente. Zeitgenössische arabische Kunst, Walid Raad und die Frage der Re-Präsentation. In: Regina Göckede, Alexandra Karentzos (Eds.): Der Orient, die Fremde. Positionen zeitgenössischer Kunst und Literatur. Bielefeld 2006, pp. 185-203. The Atlas Group (1989-2004) Walid Raad - Arquivo Fotográfico Pessoal Ingrid Calame is a Los Angeles-based artist whose work attempts to document “the lowly visual remains of human activity” by tracing everyday marks of human presence (Harmon 106). In the examples shown here, Calame has traced the marks found in the Los Angeles river bed—including graffiti, stains, and other human marks—and has then overlaid tracings that record the regularized physical movements of people who work in the observatory. Calame has also done extensive tracings of skid marks at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and areas of the trading floor at the New York Stock Exchange. In all her work is an awareness of the passing through of human activity, driven by a desire to record human presence. At the same time, however, her work emphasizes the difficulty of capturing that human presence in various spaces.

My question then is: does this work fit in with a definition of “map”? Do these works count as “maps”?

Yes: Katharine Harmon seems to think so; she argues that Calame’s work fits into a definition of maps as “simplified representations of the Earth’s surface or depictions of relationships between the components of a space” and that it “documents the relationship between humans and their environments” (106). Might Calame’s work also fit under the heading of “new cartography” that Deleuze has observed? That is: “a mode of spatial thinking that sought not to trace out representations of the real, but to construct mappings that refigure relations in ways that render alternate epistemologies and very different ways of world making” (Cobarrubias and Pickles 40)?

No: The artist herself claims that she does not see her work as “maps” but, regardless, it does arise from a “cartographic desire to know the world.” So should we then define a “map” as any document or work of art that arises from this similar desire? How is a “cartographic” desire different from any other desire to know the world? Ingrid Calame Atlas - Atlas foi o primeiro rei da mítica Atlântida

- Condenado por Zeus a sustentar os céus para sempre

- Na cartografia, Atlas é o coletivo de mapas, a coleção de cartas que representam o planeta Terra. Duarte Belo Reinventar Duarte Belo e a forma como olhamos o país
A exposição “A construção da Fuga: território, mapeamento e processo em Duarte Belo” propõe uma reflexão sobre o método do fotógrafo que se tem dedicado a documentar o território nacional
Texto de João Eduardo Martins • 10/04/2012 - 20:14
Distribuir
Share on facebook Share on email More Sharing Services
Imprimir // A A
Nos últimos 25 anos, Duarte Belo tem fotografado Portugal, num esforço de levantamento de unidades de paisagem, arquitecturas primitivas e contemporâneas e transformações do território. Um trabalho sistemático que resultou numa obra vasta, sobre a qual se debruçaram alunos do Mestrado em Fotografia do Instituto Politécnico de Tomar (IPT) para desconstruir o processo de criação do autor. O resultado dessa abordagem pode ver-se no Centro de Arte e Imagem do IPT, em Tomar, até 22 de Abril.

Fotografias, mapas, textos, desenhos, apontamentos e itinerários constituem a matéria-prima escolhida por Duarte Belo e Nuno Faria, curador da exposição e professor do IPT. A exposição está estruturada em dois momentos distintos: um primeiro núcleo apresenta documentos – mapas, cadernos de campo e outros elementos relacionados com o processo – que procuram elucidar sobre a aproximação criativa do fotógrafo ao território, enquanto o segundo núcleo expõe fotografias do projecto Portugal – O Sabor da Terra.

“A ideia era, num primeiro momento, fazer uma espécie de atlas do meu trabalho e da minha relação com a paisagem, com o território e com a própria fotografia como meio. Na segunda sala, quisemos mostrar o produto desse trabalho que são as fotografias antes de fazer uma escolha definitiva”, salienta Duarte Belo.

O valor simbólico da imagem
O discurso expositivo surgiu do diálogo e encontro de opiniões entre os alunos e o autor, e o objectivo era trabalhar as imagens enquanto documento.

“O que mais nos interessava era perceber o valor material e simbólico da imagem e a forma como ela nos pode devolver aquilo que nos rodeia. Queríamos propor um trabalho que permitisse repensar a imagem como constitutiva da percepção que temos do território”, afirma Nuno Faria.

Nesta exposição, a reflexão sobre a forma como olhamos as imagens e como elas podem estruturar o mundo envolvente concretiza-se também na inversão das convenções no modo como tradicionalmente se expõe o material fotográfico: no primeiro núcleo, os documentos e cartografias estão expostos no plano vertical; no segundo momento expositivo, as fotografias são apresentadas na horizontal.

Segundo Duarte Belo, a exposição sugere, assim, novas relações de leitura com as imagens e pretende “estimular no público uma reflexão sobre o processo que desencadeia a imagem e o que está por trás de uma obra extensa de recolha fotográfica de Portugal”.

Naquela que se poderia designar de exposição-exercício, a montagem peculiar do material exposto convida os espectadores a olhar para o corpo de trabalho de um autor que promove a identificação e redescoberta de um país, à escala das suas multiplicidades de lugares e arquitecturas.

“É uma experiência e ao mesmo tempo uma descoberta porque nos dá a ver de forma orgânica e renovada o trabalho do Duarte Belo. E dá-nos acesso a um universo autoral que é absolutamente fascinante”, remata Nuno Faria. Albert Kahn was a French banker and philanthropist. He was born Abraham Kahn at Marmoutier, Bas-Rhin, France on 3 March 1860, into a Jewish family, one of 5 children of his parents, Louis and Babette Kahn. He died at Boulogne-Billancourt, Hauts-de-Seine, France on 14 November 1940.
In 1879 Kahn became a bank clerk in Paris, but studied for a degree in the evenings. His tutor was Henri Bergson, who remained his friend all his life. He graduated in 1881 and continued to mix in intellectual circles, making friends with Auguste Rodin and Mathurin Méheut. In 1892 Kahn became a principal associate of the Goudchaux Bank, which was regarded as one of most important financial houses of Europe.
In 1893 Kahn acquired a large property in Boulogne-Billancourt, where he established a unique garden containing a variety of garden styles including English, Japanese, a rose garden and a conifer wood. This became a meeting place for French and European intelligentsia until the 1930s when due to the Crash of 1929, Kahn became bankrupt. At that time the garden was turned into a public park in which Kahn would still take walks. Kahn died during the Nazi occupation of France.
Photograph collection

In 1909 Kahn travelled with his chauffeur and photographer, Alfred Dutertre to Japan on business and returned with many photographs of the journey. This prompted him to begin a project collecting a photographic record of the entire Earth. He appointed Jean Brunhes as the project director, and sent photographers to every continent to record images of the planet using the first colour photography, autochrome plates, and early cinematography. Between 1909 and 1931 they collected 72,000 colour photographs and 183,000 meters of film. These form a unique historical record of 50 countries, known as "The Archives of the Planet".
Kahn's photographers began documenting France in 1914, just days before the outbreak of World War I, and by liaising with the military managed to record both the devastation of war, and the struggle to continue everyday life and agricultural work.
He also promoted education at the highest level through travelling scholarships.
The economic crisis of the Great Depression ruined Kahn and put an end to his project.


The Albert Kahn gardens, Japanese section
Since 1986 the photographs have been collected into a museum at 14, Rue du Port, Boulogne-Billancourt, Paris, at the site of his garden. It is now a French national museum and includes four hectares of gardens, as well as the museum which houses his historic photographs and film.

In 1909 the millionaire French banker and philanthropist Albert Kahn embarked on an ambitious project to create a colour photographic record of, and for, the peoples of the world. As an idealist and an internationalist, Kahn believed that he could use the new autochrome process, the world's first user-friendly, true-colour photographic system, to promote cross-cultural peace and understanding.

Kahn used his vast fortune to send a group of intrepid photographers to more than fifty countries around the world, often at crucial junctures in their history, when age-old cultures were on the brink of being changed for ever by war and the march of twentieth-century globalisation. They documented in true colour the collapse of both the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empires; the last traditional Celtic villages in Ireland, just a few years before they were demolished; and the soldiers of the First World War — in the trenches, and as they cooked their meals and laundered their uniforms behind the lines. They took the earliest-known colour photographs in countries as far apart as Vietnam and Brazil, Mongolia and Norway, Benin and the United States.

At the start of 1929 Kahn was still one of the richest men in Europe. Later that year the Wall Street Crash reduced his financial empire to rubble and in 1931 he was forced to bring his project to an end. Kahn died in 1940. His legacy, still kept at the Musée Albert-Kahn in the grounds of his estate near Paris, is now considered to be the most important collection of early colour photographs in the world.
Until recently, Kahn's huge collection of 72,000 autochromes remained relatively unheard of; the vast majority of them unpublished. Now, a century after he launched his Archives of the Planet project, the BBC Book The Wonderful World of Albert Kahn, and the television series it accompanies, are bringing Kahn's dazzling pictures to a mass audience for the first time and putting colour into what we tend to think of as an entirely monochrome age. The Archives of the Planet Albert Kahn Nancy Burson produced some of the earliest computer-generated portraits, and in collaboration with MIT engineers Richard Carling and David Kramlich, became a pioneer in the now familiar territory of computer-manipulated imagery. Burson continued to collaborate with Kramlich, who later became her husband. Together the two developed a significant computer program which gives the user the ability to age the human face and subsequently has assisted the FBI in locating missing persons. In Evolution II she combined the face of a man with that of a monkey to produce an imaginary portrait of a species (as well as a technology) in transition. This image was published in a series of manipulated portraits, reproduced in the book Composites (1986).
Nancy Burson was born in St. Louis in 1948 and attended Colorado Women’s College in Denver. Her photographs and video work have been exhibited widely, and are in the collections of the International Museum of Photography, George Eastman House, Rochester, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among many other private and international public collections. Nancy Burson lives and works in New York.


Originally developed as a commission for the Millennium Dome in London in 2000, Human Race Machines have been crisscrossing the US in appearances on college and university campuses since 2003.
Primarily used as a diversity tool to discuss issues of race and ethnicity, they are a perfect tool to examine ones personal identity. They have also appeared in many science museums nation wide and have been featured in all forms of media including segments on Oprah, Good Morning America, CNN, National Public Radio, PBS, and Fuji TV News, as well as countless local TV channels in the USA. Prominent articles featuring the Human Race Machine have appeared in The New York Times, The Baltimore Sun, The Houston Chronicle, and Scientific American Magazine to name a few.
The concept of race is not genetic, but social. There is no gene for race. In 2005, there was a gene that was identified for skin color, but that was only skin deep. Skin color is simply a reflection of the amount and distribution of the pigment melanin and humans are all alike underneath their skin. This newly found gene involves a change of just one letter of DNA code out of the 3.1 billion letters in the human genome -- the complete instructions that comprise a human being. We are, in fact, all 99.9% alike.
The Human Race Machine gives us the opportunity to have a unique personal experience of being other than what we are, allowing us to move beyond our differences. We are all one race, the human one; one nationality called humanity. We are all the different hues of man. DOCUMENTAL Collection History
Photographs of British Algae is a landmark in the histories both of photography and of publishing: the first photographic work by a woman, and the first book produced entirely by photographic means. Instantly recognizable today as the blueprint process, the cyanotypes lend themselves beautifully to illustrate objects found in the sea. The Library's copy of British Algae originally belonged to Sir John Herschel (1792-1871), inventor of the blueprint process, among his many other photographic as well as scientific advances. One of thirteen known copies of the title, Photographs of British Algae was acquired in 1985 at auction directly from Herschel's descendants.



Background
"The difficulty of making accurate drawings of objects as minute as many of the Algae and Confera, has induced me to avail myself of Sir John Herschel's beautiful process of Cyanotype, to obtain impressions of the plants themselves," explained Anna Atkins in October 1843. Mrs. Atkins (1799-1871) was an amateur botanist especially interested in scientific illustration and taxonomy. Her goal in producing Photographs of British Algae was to provide a visual companion to William Harvey's pioneering but unillustrated 1841 publication Manual of British Algae; to that end, Atkins's specimen titles follow Harvey's nomenclature.

Through her father, scientist John George Children (1777-1852) whose Royal Society circle included Herschel and William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877), Atkins was aware of the group's experiments with photography. Talbot's "photogenic drawing" technique involved placing a flat object against a light-sensitized sheet of paper (sometimes pressed beneath a sheet of glass to prevent movement and ensure a sharp image) and exposing it to sunlight until the area around the object began to darken. Herschel devised a chemical method to halt the darkening and "fix" Talbot's silver-salt image - the basis for all photography until the digital era.

Hershel experimented with other light-sensitive metal compounds in addition to silver, and in 1842 discovered that colorless, water-soluble iron salts, when exposed to sunlight, form the compound known as Prussian Blue; unexposed areas remain unaffected and the salt rinses away in plain water, leaving a blue 'negative' image. Inexpensive and easy to use, the blueprinting process, or cyanotype, is familiar today as an artists' medium as well as a popular children's pastime.

Atkins used Talbot's "photogenic drawing" method, arranging her specimens on sheets of glass for easier handling for repeat exposures, and adopted Herschel's blueprinting process, to generate the multiple copies of specimen plates comprising Photographs of British Algae. She also used this same method to produce title pages and contents lists instead of having them conventionally typeset. Atkins issued the work in parts, distributing them privately between 1843 and 1853; she occasionally supplied new plates as updates and substitutions when better specimens were available (for example, see the variations in The Library's two copies of Part IV), which recipients all handled differently. Today British Algae survives in at least thirteen different copies in widely varying states of completeness. The Library's copy is among the most complete; it is also one of the most rare for retaining its original parts' wrappers and stitching.

Following the conclusion of British Algae, Atkins explored the cyanotype medium for more personal expression, creating assemblages of flowers and plants in elegant and sometimes whimsical designs. In some of her scientific plates one catches a glimpse of her ability to compose an arrangement in defiance of anything found in nature. Anna Atkins Cyanotypes of British Algae - Memória,

- Identidade

- Mapeamento do Mundo

- Recontextualização e Reinterpretação do Arquivo ARQUIVO PESSOAL ARQUIVO CIENTÍFICO "Arquivo" é uma das poucas palavras que simultaneamente representa um espaço e um documento São uma acumulação de dados e objectos sujeitos à interpretação e significação dos seus elementos aparentemente despojados de sentido. Fox Talbot The Pencil of Nature DEBATE - Nos tempos que decorrem, em que verificamos a ascenção de arquivos web (ex: Facebook, Instagram, Flickr, etc) será pertinente questionarmo-nos da possivel efemeridade e vulgarização dos mesmos? - Se não temos acesso a estes arquivos, na sua maioria, porque que continuamos a pagar pela sua conservação?
Walter Benjamin - Com base na confiança que temos na tecnologia para a criação dos nossos arquivos, seremos nós capazes daqui a alguns anos ter acesso aos mesmos? - De que forma é legitimo o acesso publico a um arquivo privado? - Sendo uma ferramenta para o entendimento da História de que forma é que estamos a alterar o conceito de verdade por detrás da palavra Arquivo, quando por motivos artisticos, politicos, ou meramente pessoais o ficcionamos? O que "existe" é uma pequena parte daquilo que é "possivel". Pere Alperch Arquivo Ficcionado tipologias Martin Parr Rosângela Rennó
Os 73 objetos que constituem o projeto Menos-valia [leilão], atualmente exposto no primeiro andar da 29a Bienal de São Paulo, foram encontrados e adquiridos em diversas feiras de artigos usados e sua ‘denominação de origem' está identificada no próprio objeto. Eles entraram novamente em circulação e foram postos a venda por diversas razões: excesso de uso e desgaste, por furto e posterior abandono, porque se tornaram obsoletos ou simplesmente porque o dono perdeu o interesse em possuí-los e os colocou no lixo, de onde saíram para voltar ao mercado.

Ao serem selecionados, recompostos, transformados e recontextualizados, esses objetos passam por sucessivas agregações de valor material e simbólico até seu destino final, a ser definido no dia 9 de dezembro de 2010, quando cada um deles será leiloado dentro da próprio pavilhão da Bienal. Ao adquirir um objeto, o comprador receberá o certificado de propriedade de uma parte do projeto Menos-valia [leilão] e poderá incluí-lo em sua coleção de arte.

No campo das idéias, Menos-valia [leilão] pode ser compreendido, também, como uma das práticas contemporâneas mais fortemente vinculadas às atuais teorias da Ruinologia, como a do ‘recuperacionismo ativo de transformação', entre outras consolidadas recentemente. Menos-valia [leilão] A Última Foto

Convidei 43 fotógrafos profissionais para fotografar o Cristo Redentor usando câmeras mecânicas de diversos formatos, das câmeras de chapa 9x12 cm, do início do século 20, até as câmeras reflex, para filme 35mm, da década de 80, que colecionei ao longo dos últimos 15 anos. As câmeras, usadas pela última vez, foram lacradas. As fotos foram editadas por mim e seus autores. O projeto A última foto é constituído por 43 dípticos, compostos pelas câmeras e a última foto registrada por elas. Fotografia digital (processo Lightjet) em papel Fuji Crystal Archive
180 x 100 cm Red Series (Militares) Rosângela Rennó wrote about this series:

The starting point of Red Series (Military) is the "portrait bourgeois". The original portraits that make up the Red Series were obtained from a collection of family albums from different countries (Brazil, U.S., Germany, France, Russia, Argentina, and others), donated by friends, bought in flea markets and second hand shops, and found on the streets. All are domestic photographs showing individual men and children wearing military (or military-inspired) uniforms.

The images were retouched in the computer to achieve a certain "zero degree" of visibility, as though immersed into the saturation of the applied blood-red color. The blood-like color used annuls the whites and "delays/pushes the image to the limit of visibility. "According to Mariano Navarro, in Red Series there is an effect of "evaporation of the image, by the action of thinning it out until it becomes almost transparent. Then, only the spectator's susceptibility (the action of receiving/absorbing something in himself or the aptitude for experiencing a certain effect) will endow a personal content to something that comes to us from the shadows and lights of the past."

In a way, there is a common opaque background in all of the images, where the different thin images are amalgamated. Effects of a phantasmagoria where the universal male vanity, associated with the use of the uniform, enters in tune with violence in a latent form. 37 vitrines contendo álbuns antigos de fotografia e fotografia em cor laminada sob acrílico, mapa e arquivo de aço Bibliotheca: ou das possíveis estratégias da memória O Centro de Arte Moderna da Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian apre senta uma retros pe tiva da artista bra si leira Rosangela Rennó que marca duas déca das de tra ba lhos em torno de ques tões rela ti vas à ima gem. A artista, resi­dente no Rio de Janeiro, cedo teve acesso a um palco inter na ci o nal, tendo sido con vi dada a expor em várias bie­nais como a de Veneza (1993 e 2003), a de Berlim (2001) e a de São Paulo (1994 e 2010), entre mui tas expo si ções indi vi du ais em vários cen tros de arte. O seu tra ba lho constrói-​​se a par tir de foto gra fias, nega ti vos e sli des, na maior parte das vezes encon tra dos, que ser vem de maté ria para o desen vol vi mento de ins ta la ções mul ti mé dia onde o lugar social da ima gem está em foco. E é pre ci sa mente mer gu lhando no que se poderá cha mar de arquivo morto, cons ti tuído por ima gens anó ni mas cuja iden ti dade o tempo apa gou, que Rosângela des cons trói os ali cer ces de uma soci e dade, obser vando espe ci al mente aquilo que se quis esque cer. Amnésia e memó ria são dois ele men tos que atra ves sam parte do seu tra ba lho, que tanto ganha uma como vente carga poé tica como polí tica. E ape sar de muito do seu tra ba lho se refe rir a um con texto social bra si leiro, a pas sa gem do tempo apaga os aspe tos indi vi du ais dei­xando assim em evi den cia a dimen são abran gente do seu uni verso. Em expo si ção até 6 de maio no CAM. Duarte Amaral Netto Fotocolagem Richard Hamilton Pablo Picasso Rosandekker Origem da palavra• Do Grego “Archeion” – edifício governamental
• Originalmente, o termo aplicava-se aos documentos das instituições administrativas (governos) – Conceito de Arquivo Público.
• Acaba por se estender aos restantes domínios da vida pública e privada. ARQUIVO • Surgem na antiga Mesopotâmia: tal como a escrita veio responder às necessidades dos primeiros administradores e contabilistas, antes de responder a necessidades intelectuais e artísticas, a conservação de documentos veio responder às necessidades das crescentemente complexas sociedades urbanas dos vales do Tigre e do Eufrates. Breve história • As primeiras placas de argila conservam os textos de proclamações e decretos, listas de inventários e transacções comerciais entre privados e instituições, ou decisões judiciais – estes documentos, por sua vez, constituem os primeiros arquivos. • Grécia e Roma: desenvolve-se a prática da conservação dos Arquivos, que atingem um alto nível de perfeição sob a administração burocrática dos Impérios Romano e Bizantino.

• Alta Idade Média: decadência

• Renascimento: ressurge a prática da conservação dos arquivos a partir do reinado de Hohenstaufen-Anjou, no sul de Itália e nas cidades-estado no norte italiano: os arquivos revelam-se uma parte fundamental na afirmação do Estado moderno. • Tendência para a concentração dos arquivos, antecipando os Arquivos Nacionais:
– Arquivos Gerais de Simancas, España (1543);
– Arquivos da Dinastia, Estado e Corte emViena (1749) • Revolução Francesa: criação do Archive National de France, como depósito dos documentos do governo central, passado e presente; posteriormente, estabelecimento de arquivos regionais nas províncias e departamentos (archives départementales).
• É também a R.F. que reconhece aos cidadãos o direito a consultarem os arquivos do Estado, frisando que estes “são propriedade do povo cujos direitos legais e história preservam”. • Arquivos públicos (nacionais, distritais, municipais; notariais, de ministérios, de escolas, de entidades administrativas variadas – são indispensáveis para a protecção da propriedade e outros direitos legais dos cidadãos)

• Arquivos empresariais

• Arquivos de família ou privados

• Arquivos eclesiásticos Tipos de arquivos (quanto às instituições que produzem os documentos) Tipos de arquivos (quanto à permanência dos documentos) • Arquivos correntes ou administrativos (asseguram ofuncionamento das instituições e a aplicação dos direitoslegais e das políticas institucionais e governamentais)

• Arquivos intermédios (contêm documentos que aindapodem ser úteis na vida dos cidadãos e das instituições,e cujo destino final, dependendo do seu valor intrínseco,poderá ser a eliminação ou a passagem para o arquivo histórico)

• Arquivos históricos (contêm a informação indispensávelao reconhecimento da história dos países, possibilitandoa compreensão da evolução e dos problemas contemporâneos) • Arquivos do Vaticano (arquivos secretosabertos ao público erudito em 1881 pelo Papa Leão XIII)
• National Archives and Records Service (EUA)
• Arquivos do Museu do Palácio de Pequim
• Organização internacional: InternationalArchives Council, fundada em 1948. Arquivos importantes no mundo Arquivística é a disciplina que trata dos aspectos teóricos e práticos dos arquivos e da sua função.

Assim, vai desenvolver-se a partir da análise, do trabalho de campo e da investigação sobre as organizações produtoras de documentos, que os reúnem constituindo arquivos, para fins materiais ou culturais. Temos, pois que a Arquivística se debruça sobre um dos produtos mais naturais do Homem, os Arquivos.

A Arquivística estabeleceu princípios essenciais, metodologia e linguagem próprias, que a faz identificar-se e se distinguir das outras Ciências afins, com as quais está integrada no conjunto das Ciências da documentação e da Informação.

O seu objectivo prende-se com a formação, organização e conservação dos documentos, com a economia de tempo na investigação, economia de pessoal e no trabalho, e direcção do Arquivo.

Nesta perspectiva a Arquivística deve responder com a criação de uma metodologia própria para que o arquivo possa desempenhar e cumprir os seus objectivos, desenvolver procedimentos e instrumentos de trabalho que permitam ao Arquivista, conservar, gerir e difundir os documentos de arquivo. Esta metodologia radica, pois no carácter orgânico do arquivo, e consiste em aplicar o principio básico, de respeitar a ordem natural de criação dos documentos, a que chamamos principio de proveniência ou principio do respeito pela estrutura dos fundos.

Em suma, a Arquivística é a Ciência que organiza e torna acessível a informação documental produzida por uma Organização no desenrolar das suas relações sociais, a ponto de ser possível conhecer toda a informação que um documento possa proporcionar. INTRODUÇÃO

O ARQUIVO

Arquivos das Civilizações Pré-Clássicas

Arquivos Greco-Romanos

Arquivos Medievais

Arquivos da Idade Moderna

Arquivos na Época Contemporânea

ARQUIVÍSTICA

Evolução Histórica

CONCLUSÕES

BIBLIOGRAFIA

INTRODUÇÃO

No presente trabalho traçar-se-á em síntese a evolução histórica do Arquivo e da Arquivística desde a sua origem até aos dias de hoje.

Assim na base deste trabalho estarão presentes os passos que o Arquivo e a Arquivística deram através dos tempos, os seus altos e baixos, em suma a larga caminhada para a sua afirmação.

De entre a bibliografia diversa em que este trabalho se apoiará, destaca-se o magnífico trabalho, Arquivística. Teoria e prática de uma ciência da informação, de A. Malheiro da Silva e outros autores.

Se por um lado o Arquivo, é hoje definido como, o conjunto de documentos, independentemente da sua data, da sua forma, e do suporte material, produzidos ou recebidos por qualquer pessoa, física ou moral, ou por qualquer organismo público ou privado no exercício da sua actividade, conservados pelos seus criadores ou sucessores para as suas necessidades, ou transmitidos a instituições de arquivos, por outro a Arquivística é a disciplina que trata dos aspectos teóricos e práticos dos Arquivos e da sua função.

Ora, estas duas definições são hoje dadas pelo Conseil International des Archives, mas, para aqui chegar um longo caminho teve que ser percorrido, e para as compreendermos temos que conhecer então esse trajecto.

Longe da pretensão de elaborar um tratado sobre a História do Arquivo e da Arquivística, fica a esperança de que este trabalho sirva como mais um contributo para a uma melhor compreensão do seu papel ao longo dos tempos.

O ARQUIVO

Para podermos analisar a evolução histórica dos arquivos, será necessário estabelecer balizas cronológicas, assim iremos ás origens, desde o nascimento destes, com as Civilizações Pré-Clássicas até aos dias de hoje.

Ao longo da História, que os arquivos se encontraram com diferentes suportes, desde as placas de argila, do papiro, do papel, entre outros.

Hoje, a variedade de suportes aumentou, o que por sua vez aumentou o conteúdo destes que se tornou bastante variado.

Os arquivos constituem desde sempre a memória das instituições e das pessoas, e existem desde que o Homem fixou por escrito as suas relações como ser social.

Vários autores defendem que, a História dos Arquivos não pode ser considerada à margem da História Geral da que formam parte integrante, tanto que a sociedade condiciona a sua existência, a sua organização, os seus critérios de conservação e, mesmo, a sua finalidade. A evolução histórica dos arquivos e do seu conceito como veremos é paralela ao desenvolvimento das sociedades humanas.

Assim, os arquivos surgem desde que a escrita começou a estar ao serviço da sociedade, e terão nascido de forma espontânea no seio das Antigas Civilizações do Médio Oriente há cerca de seis milénios atrás.

O aparecimento da escrita condicionou o aparecimento dos primeiros Arquivos, de tal forma que desde logo a humanidade tomou consciência de era necessário conservar os registos produzidos para mais tarde poderem ser utilizados.

Arquivos das Civilizações Pré-Clássicas

Os Arquivos mais antigos que são conhecidos, remontam ao 4º milénio a. C., junto das Civilizações do Vale do Nilo e Mesopotâmia. Graças à Arqueologia foram descobertos, quer em Elba, Lagash, Maari, Ninive, Ugarit, etc. diversos vestígios dos primeiros Arquivos. Em Elba por exemplo encontraram-se numerosas placas de argila, dispostas em estantes de madeira e em distintas salas, grandes volumes de documentos, missivas governamentais, sentenças judiciais, cartas, actos privados, etc.

Estes arquivos situavam-se, nesta época em Templos e Palácios, para estarem mais próximos das classes dirigentes.

Há autores que defendem que estas estruturas se podem já considerar como verdadeiros Arquivos devido ao tipo de documentação que lá era conservada.

Descobriu-se que a sua organização tinha já um grau superior, pois encontraram-se léxicos e catálogos descritivos.

Através, também da Arqueologia, foi possível reconstituir a organização de alguns dos arquivos descobertos, que demonstraram que estes dispunham já de muitos dos elementos que se iram tornar clássicos e que ainda hoje são definidos pela Arquivística.

Desde logo, que estes arquivos tiveram grande importância, e constituíam já um complexo sistema de informação, não sendo concebidos como simples depósitos de placas de argila, mas como complexas estruturas organizativas e funcionais.

Aos arquivos desta época podemos apelida-los de arquivos de palácios ou arquivos de placas de argila.

Tudo indica que alguns dos pressupostos modernos da Arquivística estavam já patentes nos Arquivos das Civilizações Pré-Clássicas.

Arquivos Greco – Romanos

É atribuído a Éfialtes, cerca de 460 a. C., a criação do primeiro arquivo do mundo grego. Também aqui os arquivos se situavam em templos e em dependências do Senado, a Sul da Ágora como em Atenas.

Da Grécia Antiga destacam-se os arquivos de Gea e Palas Atenen, por ai se encontrarem importantes depósitos de documentos, como leis e decretos, actas judicias, decretos governamentais, inventários, etc.

Interessante será referir que em Atenas cada magistratura dispunha do seu Archeion, ou seja o lugar onde se redigem e conservam os documentos expedidos pelo poder governativo. Este conceito irá ser transmitido ao mundo romano, onde será conhecido como Archivium. A partir de 350 a. C. aparece-nos o termo Métrôon que era onde se guardavam leis e decretos governamentais, actas do Senado, etc., e que funcionava como Arquivo do Estado ateniense. Acredita-se que um pouco por toda a Grécia haveriam noutras cidades, arquivos civis e religiosos.

Temos pois, que os arquivos no plano técnico dispunham já de um nível de maturidade bastante elevado.

Segundo Plutarco, é atribuído a Valerius Publicoa, que exercia a função de Cônsul em 509 a. C., a criação do primeiro arquivo da Roma antiga.

Os arquivos da Roma antiga seguem de perto os das cidades gregas, continuando na Época Republicana a funcionar em templos, nomeadamente em Roma, no Templo de Saturno, junto ao erário público, onde se guardavam as Tabulae Publicae, que depois se veio a denominar Tabularium, agora situado no Capitólio. O Tabularium, desempenhava a função de Arquivo Central do Estado, já com a importância de um grande serviço público. Os documentos diplomáticos eram conservados no Templo de Júpiter e os testamentos no de Vesta.

Durante a época Imperial, os srinia começaram a especializar-se como srinium a memoria, que estava encarregada de publicar e conservar as ordens do Imperador, por outro lado, a denominada a libellis, foi criada para atender o despacho das publicações e consultas elevadas à Corte. A cognitiones ou a cognitionibus, estava a cargo dos litígios civis e criminais que se apresentavam ao Imperador.

Haviam ainda os srinia ou rationibus, que tratava das finanças e da contabilidade Imperial e finalmente a ab epistalis, onde se redigiam as contestações do Imperador ás consultas formuladas por funcionários e cidadãos. Sabe-se que cada uma desta “repartições” tinham os seus próprios arquivos independentes fisicamente em estantes separadas, onde se aplicava um rigoroso respeito pela proveniência dos fundos. Um dos grandes feitos dos romanos nesta área, é o facto de terem instaurado uma verdadeira rede de arquivos, assim um pouco por todo o Império vamos assistir ao aparecimento de Tabularius nas cidades provinciais mais importantes, nos quais se recolhia a legislação, a jurisprudência e a documentação da administração provincial, assim como surge também os arquivos do municípios e os arquivos privados, fruto do desenvolvimento do Direito, e que constituíam um instrumento fundamental para a garantia da propriedade dos cidadãos. De referir ainda que a organização romana desenvolveu o conceito da Arquivo Público, pois apesar dos arquivos centrais terem sido criados para uso estatal, abriram as portas à sociedade, funcionando como garantia de prova para a reclamação de direitos dos cidadãos.

No âmbito da Organização Arquivística, tivemos grandes progressos, pois os romanos tinham um grande sentido prático e concediam à administração do Império uma grande importância, o que levou que muitos dos critérios utilizados por eles continuam ainda hoje em dia válidos, tanto nas linhas orientadoras da profissão de arquivista como na configuração da sua rede de arquivos.

Como nos refere A. Malheiro da Silva, a importância concedida à relação entre documento e a entidade produtora virá, por sua vez a constituir a chave da Arquivística moderna. Também com o mundo romano assistimos à metamorfose da Arquivística numa disciplina com uma missão e regras próprias, servida por uma enorme rede de serviços e um corpo profissional especializado.

Podemos concluir então que, em termos organizacionais os romanos dispõem já de um desenvolvido sistema público de arquivos, que se denota bem pela complexidade da sua administração.

Arquivos Medievais

Com o advento da Idade Média o Arquivo passa a significar o espaço ou serviço onde se preservam registos antigos, ou seja começa-se a difundir a ideia de Arquivo como espaço ou serviço onde se recolhem documentos de valor, por constituírem prova ou memória de actos ocorridos no passado, sob as designações de origem Pré-Clássica, como Santuário ou Tesouro.

Ao cair o Império Romano vai desaperecer a complexa administração que se havia desenvolvido até então, onde se vê desaperecer a ideia de saúde pública e bem comum, aparecendo por sua vez a ideia de vida privada, que se vai converter no factor predominante desta época.

Do Estado como Respublica passamos ao Estado Propriedade de quem detém o poder, onde a faculdade ou direito de criar arquivos, só tinham os que detinham a soberania. Assim desaparece, também a noção de Arquivo Público.

Na Idade Média a gestão de documentos vão estar fundamentalmente nas mãos da Igreja, detentora do “Saber e da Cultura”, concentrados em Catedrais e Mosteiros.

Os Arquivos Eclesiásticos vão assim ter a função de guardar e gerir os títulos de propriedade, quer da Igreja, quer de outras instituições públicas e particulares.

Apesar disto os Arquivos nesta época recuperam a importância que tinham na Antiguidade. Sendo que, com o redescobrimento do Direito Romano no Século XII entramos numa nova fase da história dos arquivos.

Então, a partir do século XIII, começa a ser introduzida a prática dos registos, que eram livros onde se transcreviam os documentos outorgados por uma autoridade, ou entidade, nomeadamente nas Chancelarias, e outras instituições. Nesta época as unidades administrativas destas estruturas dividiam-se já em secções orgânicas, e com funcionários especializados (arquivistas) e normas a seguir.

Será importante referir que, a prática arquivística nesta época, não se confinava só à Europa, conhecendo-se os casos da China e do Mundo Árabe.

Com o Século XIV surgem por toda a Europa vários Arquivos Centrais como o Archivo de la Corona de Aragón em 1318 e o Arquivo da Torre do Tombo em 1325, entre outros. Ao mesmo tempo dá-se também a descentralização dos arquivos, o que leva ao aparecimento dos Cartórios Concelhios, é a época de novas tipologias documentais, como os inventários, dá-se o alargamento ao tipo de documentos a conservar, como documentos financeiros e historiográficos, etc.

É durante este século que assistimos ao primeiro grande movimento de nomeação de arquivistas oficiais nas Cortes de Europa.

Este movimento, leva a que os Arquivos sejam encarados de uma forma diferente, contribuído para que a partir do século XV surjam grandes cronistas oficiais, juntamente com o aparecimento dos primeiros cultores da crítica filológica e textual.

Como vimos, e ao qual já se havia feito referência, na Idade Média o Arquivo vai recuperar a sua a importância.

Arquivos da Idade Moderna

Com o século XVI, vemos surgir um novo sistema administrativo, o Estado Moderno. Absolutista e Centralizador por natureza, contribuirá para a concentração dos arquivos, fazendo surgir os primeiros Arquivos de Estado, que resultam de novas concepções de administração e reformas institucionais. A criação do Arquivo de Simancas em 1540, em Espanha por ordem de Carlos V, considerado o Arquivo Moderno do Estado Espanhol, é de facto um sinal bastante significativo do novo sistema administrativo. Este arquivo é considerado como o primeiro exemplo de um Arquivo de Estado. Mais tarde, iremos assistir à criação do Arquivo Secreto do Vaticano em 1611, e ainda na Espanha o Arquivo das Índias, em 1788, eles também exemplares de Arquivos de Estado.

Será importante referir que, esta centralização dos documentos, irá provocar ajustamentos metodológicos, sendo frequente a elaboração de normas, regulando os preceitos de rotina do Arquivista.

Segundo, autores como Jean Favier, a noção de Propriedade dos Arquivos foi substituída pela de Arquivos Públicos depositários dos documentos do Estado e cuja conservação era ou podia ser de interesse público.

O arquivo vai-se converter num elemento fundamental da administração e a adquirir uma função predominantemente juridico-politica.

Ruiz Rodríguez, defende que nesta época, se encerra um período da História, em que os Arquivos tiveram um papel de serviço ás instituições e governos que os fizeram nascer. Em suma, foram colaboradores dos Estados na administração dos respectivos territórios.

Este período fica, pois conhecido como a época dos Arquivos de Estado.

Arquivos na Época Contemporânea

A partir de 1789, com a Revolução Francesa iremos assistir a uma verdadeira mudança na História da Europa, que se irá repercutir na noção e funcionalidade dos Arquivos. Com o advento do Estado de Direito nasce um novo conceito, a Soberania Nacional. Neste contexto, nascem os princípios de responsabilidade, de garantia, eficácia e justiça da actuação da Administração perante os cidadãos.

Associado a isto, o Arquivo passa a ser considerado como Garantia dos Direitos dos Cidadãos, e Jurisprudência da actuação do Estado.

Um dos grandes marcos, para a História dos Arquivos, é sem sombra de dúvida a fundação de raiz, logo em 1789, dos Archives Nationales de França, e com eles a já muito conhecida Lei de 7 Messidor, que sai no Ano II da Revolução, que proclama que os Arquivos estabelecidos junto da representação nacional eram um depósito central para toda a República. A esta Lei traz um conceito moderno e liberal de Arquivo, onde o Arquivo Central do Estado deixou de constituir um privilégio dos órgãos de poder e passou a ser entendido como Arquivo da Nação aberto ao cidadão comum.

No século XIX, a política de concentração dos Arquivos vai ser continuada um pouco por toda a Europa, à excepção da Grã-Bretanha onde o processo vai ser mais tardio. No início deste século, perante o desenvolvimento do Positivismo, que preconizava a verificação documental ao serviço da análise histórica, contribui para que os arquivos adquirissem uma posição instrumental relativamente à Paleografia e à Diplomática. Já na segunda metade deste mesmo século e agora sob os auspícios do Historicismo os arquivos vão-se transformar em verdadeiros laboratórios do saber histórico.

Na Época Contemporânea os arquivos vão adquirir dupla dimensão, onde se por um lado são garantia dos direitos dos cidadãos, por outro conservam e gerem a memória do passado da nação e por isso vão ser objecto da investigação histórica.

Bautier, defende, a ideia de, que até meados do século XX os arquivos desenvolveram sobretudo a vertente de conservadores e gestores da memória do passado, deixando de lado a função de serviço à Administração, que até aí tinham desempenhado.

No século XX vamos pois assistir à consolidação do conceito e função de Arquivo, como conjunto de documentos, independentemente da data, da forma e do suporte material, produzidos ou recebidos por qualquer pessoa, física ou moral, ou por qualquer organismo público ou privado no exercício da sua actividade, conservados pelos seus criadores ou sucessores para as suas próprias necessidades ou transmitidos a instituições de Arquivos.

A Arquivística

Segundo a definição que nos é dada pelo Dicionário de Terminologia Arquivística do Conselho Internacional de Arquivos, ao qual já se fez referencia neste trabalho, a Arquivística é a disciplina que trata dos aspectos teóricos e práticos dos arquivos e da sua função.

Assim, vai desenvolver-se a partir da análise, do trabalho de campo e da investigação sobre as organizações produtoras de documentos, que os reúnem constituindo arquivos, para fins materiais ou culturais. Temos, pois que a Arquivística se debruça sobre um dos produtos mais naturais do Homem, os Arquivos.

A Arquivística estabeleceu princípios essenciais, metodologia e linguagem próprias, que a faz identificar-se e se distinguir das outras Ciências afins, com as quais está integrada no conjunto das Ciências da documentação e da Informação.

O seu objectivo prende-se com a formação, organização e conservação dos documentos, com a economia de tempo na investigação, economia de pessoal e no trabalho, e direcção do Arquivo.

Nesta perspectiva a Arquivística deve responder com a criação de uma metodologia própria para que o arquivo possa desempenhar e cumprir os seus objectivos, desenvolver procedimentos e instrumentos de trabalho que permitam ao Arquivista, conservar, gerir e difundir os documentos de arquivo. Esta metodologia radica, pois no carácter orgânico do arquivo, e consiste em aplicar o principio básico, de respeitar a ordem natural de criação dos documentos, a que chamamos principio de proveniência ou principio do respeito pela estrutura dos fundos.

Em suma, a Arquivística é a Ciência que organiza e torna acessível a informação documental produzida por uma Organização no desenrolar das suas relações sociais, a ponto de ser possível conhecer toda a informação que um documento possa proporcionar.



Evolução Histórica

A Arquivística nasce na sequência da Revolução Francesa com os novos serviços de Arquivo que então foram criados e no seio da História Positivista, fortemente vinculada à Diplomática. Só com a prática da teoria de que os documentos se devem organizar de acordo com a estrutura da instituição de onde provêem, a Arquivística se conseguiu autonomizar e tornar-se independente. Este, princípio proveniência é considerado a base desta Ciência.

Segundo Posner, internacionalmente consensual, a data aceite para o nascimento da Arquivística, é o dia 24 de Abril de 1841, quando Natalis de Wally introduziu as normas para a organização dos fundos reunidos nos Arquivos Nacionais Franceses, de livre acesso de consulta desde a Revolução Francesa.

Mas, o grande marco na evolução da Arquivística, podemos encontra-lo em 1898, com a publicação do Manual dos Arquivistas Holandeses, por Muller, Feith e Fruin, onde se abre uma nova era para a disciplina, e que representa a afirmação e libertação da Arquivística, relativamente ao papel secundário para a qual tinha sido remetida até então, como veremos mais adiante.

No entanto muito antes, do seu nascimento formal da Arquivística como disciplina, já existia como prática de sistematização e conservação de fundos documentais, desde que o Homem criou os primeiros Arquivos, como depósitos dos testemunhos escritos e como base do seu direito.

Desde a Roma Antiga que, nos encontramos com um método de trabalho, a que hoje chamamos principio de proveniência, onde os documentos produzidos por diferentes dependências se conservavam em diferentes galerias do Tabularium e do Templo de Saturno, mantendo independentes cada um deste fundos, onde em cada um destes documentos eram já ordenados cronologicamente, formando séries. No entanto esta prática tinha simplesmente uma orientação lógica, onde não se pensava num futuro interesse histórico dos documentos nem no estabelecimento de uma doutrina arquivística.

Com o aparecimento das Chancelarias da Idade Média, e a consequente produção e conservação documental, surgem os cartulários onde se copiavam os documentos recebidos por uma instituição, e os registos. Assistimos a uma evolução sem sobressaltos na prática arquivística.

Na Idade Moderna, e Ilustração a Arquivística vai evoluir no sentido de procurar facilitar as técnicas que garantam a organização e conservação dos depósitos que estão nos arquivos, surgindo para o efeito vários conjuntos de normas a seguir.

Com, o século XVII veremos proliferar a Literatura Arquivística, aumentando a sua produção durante o século XVIII, período onde já se discutia os conceitos para a organização dos arquivos. Paralelamente á emergência deste tipo de literatura os arquivos, começam a ser consultados por investigadores e eruditos, tendo em vista a preparação das primeiras histórias cientificas, fenómeno que vai influenciar a Arquivística no século seguinte.

O papel da Arquivística no século XIX, vai ser o de procurar novas teorias, que facilitem o Arquivo a prestar um bom serviço à História. A mais importante destas, e que se converterá no principio fundamental da Arquivística, como já se referiu, vai ser sem dúvida a teoria do principio de proveniência.

A Arquivística vai agora centrar a sua atenção, para a descrição, e para a elaboração de instrumentos de trabalho que permitam ao historiador encontrar facilmente a informação de que necessita para investigação.

Surgem, um pouco por todo o lado, Colecções Diplomáticas, Guias, Inventários, Catálogos e Índices, e muito menos literatura sobre Teoria Arquivística, com acontecia no século anterior.

Apesar disto, vemos surgir, já desde os finais do século XVIII, por toda a Europa, Escolas de Formação Profissional de Ensinamentos por Oralidade, o que representa já a preocupação da Arquivística no campo de formação especializada dos arquivistas.

Nos finais do século XIX, vamos assistir a um grande marco da evolução da Arquivística, onde se vai consolidar o Modelo quanto á Origem e Organização dos Arquivos, o que vai contribuir para que seja criado uma Autoridade Arquivística Central, resumindo, um órgão que coordene a política relativa aos Arquivos a nível internacional. Ao mesmo tempo vai-se sentir pela Europa, América e U.R.S.S. grandes alterações nos campos da Organização e da Política Arquivística. Toda esta viragem se vai efectuar a partir de 1898, com a edição do Manual dos Arquivistas Holandeses, que sistematizava a teoria de Natallis de Wally e fundamentaria as Bases da Arquivística Moderna. É de referir que, na transição do século XIX para o Século XX, nomeadamente durante o início do segundo se dará a consolidação definitiva das ideias surgidas na Revolução Francesa quanto ao Modelo Arquivístico.

Com o século XX, os Arquivos, irão recuperar a sua dimensão administrativa, que se irá acentuar nos Anos 30, e se consolidará mais tarde, já nos anos 50, onde a Arquivística irá desenvolver um sistema para facilitar a Administração nos momentos mais difíceis, como por exemplo a Segunda Guerra Mundial.

É precisamente a partir dos Anos 50 que se tenta conciliar as dimensões tradicionais da Arquivística, a História e a Administração.

Surge então no âmbito da UNESCO, em Agosto de 1950 o Conselho Internacional de Arquivos (CIA), que vem dar resposta à necessidade de coordenação a nível internacional, da Arquivística. Com o CIA, vai-se assistir à intensificação da cooperação entre países, na Organização de Congressos, Mesas Redondas, assim como se aumentará a publicação de literatura especializada, como a revista Archivium, que nasce logo em 1951, vemos surgir também as Conferências Internacionais da Table Ronde des Archives.

Os Anos 60 são envolvidos por preocupações de ordem prática, dando-se uma acentuação na vertente técnica da Arquivística. O grande marco desta época acontece em 1964, ano em que é publicado o Elsevier´s Lexicon of Archive Terminology.

Na década seguinte, por sua vez assiste-se ao aprofundamento das questões teóricas da Arquivística, que irão contribuir para o seu desenvolvimento científico.

Reforça-se o papel dos profissionais de Arquivo, fazendo surgir as primeiras Associações de Arquivistas, como a Associação Portuguesa de Bibliotecários, Arquivistas e Documentalistas (BAD), logo em 1973. E já nos finais da década, é criado a Programa de Gestão dos Documentos (RAMP), que assegura a publicação de documentos que abarcam a maior parte dos aspectos da Arquivística.

Os Anos 70, prendem-se pelo aprofundamento de questões essenciais para a formulação de um corpo teórico capaz de suportar um fundamentação da Arquivística.

Já com os anos 80 se caminha para a afirmação da Arquivística com Ciência da Informação, e na procura dos seus fundamentos, que se irá acentuar nos anos 90.

A Arquivística nos anos 90 entrou numa nova era, onde a grande preocupação se prendeu e ainda se prende, nos dias de hoje, com a importância da Informática como meio de gerir novos documentos.

Nesta nova era a Arquivística afirma-se definitivamente como uma Ciência da Informação e se clarificam o seu objecto e o seu método.

Dentro deste contexto podemos afirmar que a Arquivística é hoje uma Ciência que procura uma identidade própria que lhe dê autonomia e respeito da História e da Administração. Os Arquivos de toda as épocas e condições, quer Históricos quer Administrativos, são por sua vez o seu objecto. Por outro lado a Arquivística elabora normas e instrumentos de trabalho que permitem ao Arquivista organizar a documentação e dispô-la ao serviço do utente do Arquivo, assim como deve contribuir para a identificação e valorização arquivística, criar normas de reprodução em Arquivos, de instalação, conservação e restauração dos documentos a cargo dos mesmos. A gestão de informação, com o advento da nova tecnologias contribuiu para que a Arquivística adoptasse novas técnicas de trabalho, fazendo com que entrasse no campo das Ciências da Informação, criando princípios universais aplicáveis a todos os arquivos do mundo, através da normalização dos seus princípios orgânico-descritivos, de vocabulário internacional e homologação dos conteúdos da formação profissional dos Arquivistas.



CONCLUSÕES

Ao longo deste trabalho traçaram-se em síntese os caminhos percorridos pelos Arquivos e pela Arquivística ao longo da sua História e da História da Sociedade Humana. Procurou-se assim destrinçar a sua evolução histórica desde o seu nascimento até à sua afirmação nos nossos dias.

Passemos então, mais uma vez, em revista todo este processo de milénios de uma prática, que finalmente no século XXI se vê plenamente reconhecida.

Os Arquivos logo na sua origem confundem-se com a própria escrita, e vamos encontra-los já no seio das Civilizações Pré-Clássicas, e que no mundo Greco-Romano, devido ao desenvolvimento da Administração, vêem aumentar significativamente a sua importância. O conceito de Arquivo vai-se cristalizar e vulgarizar, da passagem do Mundo Antigo para a Idade Média, voltando-se no século XV a desenvolver os Arquivos da Administração das Cortes da Europa.

A passagem à Idade Moderna vai-se dar sem grandes mudanças, no entanto no século XVI, começam a surgir manuais com uma concepção jurídica da realidade Arquivística.

Por sua vez a Revolução Francesa, vai formalizar pela primeira vez o livre acesso aos arquivos por parte do cidadão comum, e também pela primeira vez o Arquivo Central do Estado passa a ser considerado como Arquivo da Nação.

Com o século XIX, a função e os princípios de organização dos Arquivo vão ser alvo de influência do Positivismo e do Historicismo, passando a Arquivística a ser considerada como uma disciplina auxiliar da História. O grande marco deste século, é sem dúvida a edição do Manual dos Arquivistas Holandeses, que contribui para a afirmação da Arquivística, face aos desígnios das correntes historiográficas que imperavam nesse período.

O século XX vai trazer avanços significativos, e novas preocupações. Vai nascer o CIA em 1950, contribuindo para a alargamento do debate sobre os fundamentos da Arquivística. Com os anos 60 as preocupações com a terminologia arquivística, levam à edição do Elsevier´s Lexicon of Archive Terminology. A década seguinte vai dar lugar a importantes contribuições para o aprofundamento de matérias teóricas tendo em conta a promoção Científica da Arquivística.

Nos Anos 80, a nova revolução tecnológica irá forçar a adaptação da Arquivística a esta realidade, processo que se acentua com os anos 90, e que continua nos dias de hoje, chegados ao século XXI.

Porventura muito mais haveria por dizer, no entanto este é o resultado possível a que se chegou. Fica entretanto a esperança que futuramente surjam novos trabalhos e novas descobertas para que possamos melhor compreender todo o trajecto evolutivo do Arquivo e da Arquivística. FOTOGRAFIA E ARQUIVO FOTOGRAFAR / EDITAR Daniel Blaufuks O Coleccionador Alauda Publications is proud to present the new edition of Elisabeth - I want to eat -, Mariken Wessels’ first photo book. The book was initially self-published by the artist in 2008 in a small edition and was widely acclaimed. It won the Silver Medal Book Award at the Fotofestival di Roma and was recently acquired by the MoMA collection in New York.

Elisabeth - I want to eat - consists of a collection of anonymous photographs, letters and postcards belonging to a young woman, which the artist stumbled upon in a shop in the Hendrik Jacobszstraat in Amsterdam. Wessels appropriates the found material in her own way, by photographing the images, creatively processing and arranging them, as well as occasionally adding her own material. The intensity and sensuality of the photographs are reminiscent of the work of master photographers like Gerard Fieret and Miroslaw Tichý. They depict a young woman defiantly posing in front of the camera, both figuratively and literally exposing herself. The black and white photographs are worn out, frayed by numerous scratches and dust particles, blending together both the exaltation and melancholy recorded in them. Apart from the photographs, the book carries a series of printed postcards and letters addressed to Elisabeth, from which the reader gradually infers that her life was thrown off track in some way. ‘Religion, order, discipline, detachment from the quest for ambition’ – these are, in brief, the ingredients of advice, with which a family member proposes to ‘heal’ her. Yet the person giving her advice himself tells no straightforward story. One is in fact left wondering which of the two people is more bizarre. There is a stark contrast in the book between the idyllic landscapes in the postcards painted in sweet watercolour and the disarming directness of Elisabeth’s gaze in to the camera. The book contains thin colour-paper inserts, on which the letters and postcards to Elisabeth almost transform into a direct appeal to the reader. The title of the publication is taken from the only letter in the book penned by Elisabeth herself, addressed to an unknown friend:

‘(...) The last time I saw you it was nice and I felt much better. Are you still in Brussels? I don’t know but I liked the house you lived and the streets there. I want to eat.’ Mariken Wessels Arquivos nas Ciências da Informação


O Arquivo segundo a sua Classificação



Classificar

Classificar é organizar em classes, agrupar coisas que têm uma característica ou uma qualidade comum.

Princípios de qualquer classificação

Ser exaustiva: permitir a inclusão nas suas classes de todos os objectos do âmbito em causa.

Ser mutuamente exclusiva: garantir que um objecto pode ser apenas classificado numa única classe

Basear-se numa hierarquia de classes e subclasses do geral para o especifico

Explicitar os níveis de dependência.

Objectivo da Classificação em Arquivo

Elaborar um plano de Classificação, que é um elemento estruturante de qualquer serviço: orienta na produção e na organização intelectual da informação.

As Metodologias da Classificação são de dois tipos: Análise (identificação de todos os objectos a classificar), e Síntese ( agrupamento dos objectos).

Análise do Contexto de produção Documental

Legislação, normas, regulamentos

Estrutura orgânica e funcional

Implementação do sistema de arquivo(centralizado ou descentralizado)

Necessidades de informação/acesso aos documentos do sistema

Meios disponíveis para gestão do Arquivo

Levantamento de Produção Documental

Consulta do plano de Classificação/classificador e lista de processos

Levantamento sistemático dos assuntos(analise peça a peça de toda a documentação, ou amostras com identificação de alguns elementos: título se série, código de classificação, titulo do processo, datas limite e discrição do conteúdo.

Após recolha e análise do acervo documental, procede-se à síntese dos dados de forma a construir o plano de classificação com base na criação de agrupamento.

Segundo T. Schellenberg existem três tipos de classificação:

Classificação funcional

Classificação Orgânica

Classificação por Matérias "Arquivo é um sistema semi-fechado de informação social materializada em qualquer suporte, configurado por dois factores essenciais - a natureza orgânica ( estrutura) e a natureza funcional (serviço/ uso) - a que associam o terceiro - a memória - intimimamente ligado aos anteriores".

Armando Malheiro Silva - Biblioteca

- Gabinete de Amador

- Museu Ilustração Bernd and Hilla Becher Anonymous Sculptures: A Typology of Technical Construction, 1970 Water Towers, 1988 Blast Furnaces, 1990 Pennsylvania Coal Mine Tipples, 1991 Gas Tanks, 1993 Industrial Facades, 1995 Nicholas Nixon Ed Ruscha Twenty-six Gasoline Stations 1962 Eric Tabuchi twentysix abandoned gasoline stations 2002- 2008 Kevin Bauman www.100abandonedhouses.com Beierle e Keijser Thomas Ruff Candida Hoffer Joan Fontcuberta http://www.zonezero.com/exposiciones/fotografos/fontcuberta/default.html Archive João Penalva João Paulo Serafim The Polish Club Case "Z" João Paulo Serafim nasceu em Paris em 1974, realizou a sua formação académica em Fotografia e Artes Plásticas no Ar.Co, escola onde lecciona no Departamento de Fotografia desde 1998.
Em 2005 participa no Curso de Fotografia do programa Gulbenkian Criatividade e Criação Artística. Em 2008 frequenta o curso de História de Arte da Universidade Nova, participa como tutor no 2º Curso de Fotografia do programa Gulbenkian Criatividade e Criação Artística.

Paralelamente tem-se apresentado em mostras colectivas e individuais desde 1997.
Desde 2005 desenvolve o projecto MIIAC – Museu Improvável Imagem e Arte Contemporânea, a ideia deste museu, cujo conceito se baseia na pesquisa iconográfica de um acervo pessoal, construído ao longo dos anos, utilizando fotografias anónimas, postais, filmes super 8, livros de e sobre fotografia bem como encomendas a fotógrafos contemporâneos. Assim, este museu ficcionado, que se materializa virtualmente ou através de exposições em lugares diferentes, é o palco para um espaço imaginário de memórias pessoais e colectivas.

Mas a pesquisa do artista não se limita à análise formal do espaço museológico – antes pelo contrário: interessa-o também o funcionamento do próprio museu, tendo dado assim cada vez mais importância aos espaços ‘escondidos’ do museu: a biblioteca, o acervo, os arquivos, etc. Este interesse na museologia reflecte-se também no vasto espólio compilado pelo artista que contém já mais de uma centena de títulos do princípio do século XX até agora.

A partir de 2004 colabora em espectáculos dos quais se destacam , Solidão… de Cláudia Nóvoa na Box Nova do CCB, Ensaio de Victor Hugo Pontes inserido no Estado do Mundo da Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian e FITEI, festival internacional de Teatro e expressão Ibérica, Porto. Lar doce lar de Maria Gil inserido na residência artística “Sítio das Artes” no CAM da Gulbenkian e Passeio ao Norte 1963 de Joana Craveiro , João Paulo Serafim e Gonçalo Alegria.

Tem exposto regularmente em Portugal e no estrangeiro destacando a exposição individual que em 2008 foi apresentada no Centre Culturel Gulbenkian em Paris, que teve itinerância para o Museu Blanes em Montevideo. Nos últimos anos tem estado presente com exposições individuais e colectivas em instituições como a Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, a Fundação Serralves, o Museu das Comunicações em Lisboa, o Circulo de Belas Artes de Madrid e o Centro de Arte Hélio Oiticica Rio de Janeiro, entre outras. Em 2005 ganhou o Prémio Purificacíon Garcia. MIIAC ARQUIVO DIGITAL Aby Warburg Atlas Mnemosyne «Mnemosyne-Atlas»
Warburg entitled the series «Mnemosyne, A Picture Series Examining the Function of Preconditioned Antiquity-Related Expressive Values for the Presentation of Eventful Life in the Art of the European Renaissance». The atlas is fundamentally the attempt to combine the philosophical with the image-historical approach. Attached on wooden boards covered with black cloth are photographs of images, reproductions from books, and visual materials from newspapers and/or daily life, which Warburg arranges in such a way that they illustrate one or several thematic areas. Only the boards of the picture atlas have survived as photographed ensembles. Throughout the years since 1924, Warburg’s picture collection of circa 2,000 reproductions generated other configurations fixed and photographed on boards. In addition, specific themes were reconfigured for individual exhibitions or lectures. The last existing series originally consisted of 63 tableaus.
Today, Warburg’s working style would be categorized as researching ‹visual clusters›. Only these are not ordered according to visual similarity, evident in the sense of an iconographic history of style; but rather through relationships caused by an ‹affinity for one another› and the principle of ‹good company,› which let themselves be reconstructed through the study of texts (as for example, contract conditions or biological associations).

Source: Aby Warburg. Der Bilderatlas MNEMOSYNE, Martin Warnke (ed.), Berlin 2003, 2nd printing.

Rudolf Frieling - Mapeamento e Google Maps IMAGEM 1 + IMAGEM 2 = IMAGEM 3 As photographs give people an imaginary possession of a past that is unreal, they also help people to take possession of space in which they are insecure.
Susan Sontag Fotografar ou editar?
Full transcript