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Heart of Darkness

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by

Bella Brown

on 4 December 2014

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Transcript of Heart of Darkness

"a mighty big river, that you could see on the map, resembling an immense snake uncoiled, with its head in the sea, its body at rest curving afar over a vast country, and its tail lost in the depths of the land"
-Charlie Barlow describing the Congo River
Joseph Conrad
829 W Main Street, Louisville, KY 40202
Louisville Frazier Museum
Vocabulary
My Time Capsule:
Heart of Darkness
Sepulcre
(N)
-

Small room or monument, cut in rock or built of stone, in which the dead are laid to

rest
As I watched, the lid to the sepulcre closed, forever locking away a piece of my heart
Somnambulist
(N)
- Sleepwalker
As a somnambulist would, she walked with nothing behind her eyes and a mysterious reason
Sententiously
(ADJ)
- Given to excessive moralizing. Self-righteousness
"Oh! But abortion is the act of ungodly women!" Tim exclaimed sententiously.
(this is in no way my personal view)
Lugubrious
(ADJ)
- Looking or sounding sad and dismal
Lately, Thomas has been looking lugubrious. I don't know if he's depressed or just a sour mood.
Drollery
(N)
- Speech or behavior that is wryly or oddly amusing
Look at that man over there continuing on with his drollery! He is so odd, but you really can't help but have a chuckle!
Recrudescence
(N)
- Breaking out afresh or into renewed activity
After hours of not feeling as he did before, a recrudescence of his symptoms occured
Alacrity
(N)
- brisk and cheerful readiness
Surprising his mom and himself, Ron completed his chores with an unusual alacrity.
Quote:
"In the empty immensity of earth, sky, and water, there she was, incomprehensible, firing into a continent. Pop, would go one of the six-inch guns; a small flame would dart and vanish, a little white smoke would disappear, a tiny projectile would give a feeble screech—and nothing happened. Nothing could happen. There was a touch of insanity in the proceeding, a sense of lugubrious drollery in the sight; and it was not dissipated by somebody on board assuring me earnestly there was a camp of natives—he called them enemies!—hidden out of sight somewhere."
-Charlie Barlow (Conrad 1:8)
Reason:
Theme 2:
The Horrors of Imperialism
Quote:
Theme 3:
The capability of women, even in the face of the truth, to wholeheartedly believe in an illusion
Quote:
"'Yes, I know,' I said with something like despair in my heart, but bowing my head before the faith that was her, before that great and saving illusion that shone with an unearthly glow in the darkness, in the triumphant darkness from which I could not have defended her--from which I could not even defend myself"
Song:
Theme 4:
Theme 5:
Symbol: The Congo River
Theme 1:
The Themes, with Quotes and Songs for Days
In Heart of Darkness, the Congo is two things at once: 1) the path of Europeans into the heart of Africa, and 2) the attemptful banisher of Europeans from Africa.
1) The fact that the Europeans never have to truly navigate the wilds of Africa means that they never have to become one with what is already there, and are never forced to truly understand Africa.
2) As Barlow's steamer travels up the Congo River, he meets much resistane, taking excessicve amounts of time to reach the inner station, as if the river itself is trying to keep Barlow out. This is proved further by how quickly Barlow's steamer travels downstream at the end of the book, where the readmittence to civilization.
Main Character Descriptions
Charlie Barlow
Though he is the protagonist, Charlie Barlow seems to be a conduit throughout the book; meaning that the reader can easily identify and feel the books world around them through Barlow's emotions and personal rendering of the story. This is evident thanks to Barlow's personality: cynical, skeptic to the core, and an independent thinker. Barlow is also very cautious of anyone new that he meets. Barlow's character straddles the line between the traditional hero and the "broken" or "damaged" man. Thanks to unknown events, Barlow is weary of things that are easily accepted by others. Barlow is also the mediator between the extremes: particularly open-minded, Barlow is able to more easily understand both sides of any situation thrown in his direction.
Kurtz
Kurtz is everyone and no one. As you read the book, you quickly discover that Kurtz is a psychopathic megalomaniac that is, as Barlow accurately describes him, "hollow". Kurtz seems to be a blank page that allows other characters (such as Kurtz's cousin, fiancee, and the young Russian) to project their own ideas upon him and he can correctly assume each of these roles. For instance, Kurtz's fiancee believed him a great humanitarian and genius, while The Young Russian believed Kurtz a poet and very wise. Also, Kurtz's cousin saw Kurtz as a brilliant musician as The Journalist saw Kurtz as a natural politician and leader of men. This being said, Kurtz is not only an illustrious trickster, but is excruciatingly eloquent with his words, drawing people in and fooling them with the style in which he writes; this serves his delusions of grandeur, as he knows the power that one may wield, if one knows how to speak or write. This is very evident in how most people are capable of ignoring the true message of Kurtz's writings.
The madness of the Congo
WORKS CITED
http://www.sparknotes.com/nofear/lit/heart-of-darkness/part-1/
http://dictionary.reference.com/

The business found in the jungle and Congo River of Africa was odd, as "civilized" people attacked natives with no reason but because they were there. And if they were not killing the natives with gun fire, they were working them to death.
Fog
In Heart of Darkness, fog represents obscurity and unsure situations. For instance, when Barlow's steamer is slowly making its way up river, fog encases it and allows Barlow to act upon what he knows, but with no sure accuracy.
The Congo River
In Heart of Darkness, the Congo is two things at once: 1) the path of Europeans into the heart of Africa, and 2) the attemptful banisher of Europeans from Africa.
1) The fact that the Europeans never have to truly navigate the wilds of Africa means that they never have to become one with what is already there, and are never forced to truly understand Africa.
2) As Barlow's steamer travels up the Congo River, he meets much resistane, taking excessicve amounts of time to reach the inner station, as if the river itself is trying to keep Barlow out. This is proved further by how quickly Barlow's steamer travels downstream at the end of the book, where the readmittence to civilization.
Women
Symbols
Full transcript