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Untitled Prezi

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by

Colleen Lee

on 7 October 2014

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Transcript of Untitled Prezi

Finally
Some practice exercises.
Here's what you all had to say about "Adjective Clauses"
Adjective Clauses
They're used to modify
or make the clause clear.
Introduction (Key Words):
Clause:
A clause is a group of words containing a subject and a verb.

Independent Clause
: An independent clause is a complete sentence. It contains the main subject and verb of a sentence.

Dependent Clause
: is not a complete sentence; must be connected to an independent clause.

Adjective Clause:
is a dependent clause that modifies a noun. It describes, identifies, or gives further information about a noun. (also known as a "relative clause")
Using Where in adjective clauses:
Where
is used in an adjective clause to modify a place (city, country, room, house, etc.)

If
where
is used, a preposition is not included in the adjective clause as in example (a). If
where
is not used, the preposition must be included, as in (b)
Using Whose:
-is used to show possession (same meaning as other possessive pronouns used as adjectives:
his, her, its, and their
)
-is connected to a noun
For example: his bicycle > whose bicycle

-Both
whose
and the noun it is connected to are placed at the beginning of the adjective clause.
Whose
cannot be omitted.
Using When in adjective clauses:
When
is used in an adjective clause to modify a noun of time (year, day, time, century, etc.)

The use of a preposition in an adjective clause that modifies a noun of time is somewhat different from that in other adjective clauses: a preposition is used preceding
which
, as in (b). Otherwise, the preposition is omitted.
Use it to add more
information about
something
Who, who, which, where,
that
I'd like to know how to
use them correctly.
(punctuation)
There are two kinds:
1)person (that, who, whom)
2) thing (which/that)
Examples:

I know the man.
His wallet
was stolen.
a) I know the man
whose wallet
was stolen.
Examples:
The building is very old.
He lives
there (in that building)

a) The building
where
he lives is very old.
b) The building
in which
he lives is very old.
The building
which
he lives
in
is very old.
The building
that
he lives
in
is very old.
The building he lives
in
is very old.
Example:
I'll never forget the day.
I met you
then (on that day)

a) I'll never forget the day
when
I met you.
b) I'll never forget the day
on which
I met you.
c) I'll never forget the day
that
I met you.
d) I'll never forget the day I met you.
Punctuating Adjective Clauses
General Guidelines:
DO NOT USE COMMAS IF the adjective clauseis necessary to identify the noun it modifies.
USE COMMAS IF the adjective clause simply gives additional information and is not neccessary to identify the noun it modifies.
a)
The professor
who teaches Chemistry 101 is an
excellent lecturer.

b)
Professor Wilson,
who teaches Chemistry 101
,
is
an excellent lecturer.
In (a): No commas are used. The adjective clause
is necessary to identify which professor is meant.
In (b): Commas are used. The adjective clause is
not necessary to identify Professor Wilson. We already know who he is: he has a name. The adjective clause simply gives additional information.
Examples:
c)
Hawaii,
which consists of 8 principal islands
,
is a favourite vacation spot.
Use commas if an adjective clause
modifies a proper noun.
(begins with a capital letter).
* A comma reflects a pause in speech.
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