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cefpi

Inside Out : Upside Down Conference 2014
by

Martin Westwell

on 19 October 2015

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Transcript of cefpi

Chellapa et al (2013) Journal of Sleep Research 22 5 573-580
Acute exposure to evening blue-enriched light impacts on human sleep

Vandewalle et al. (2007) Cerebral Cortex 17 2788-2795
Wavelength-Dependent Modulation of Brain Responses to a Working Memory Task by Daytime Light Exposure
How neuroscience might
(and might not)
provide insights into learning

The
Science
of Learning

Prof Martin Westwell
martin.westwell@flinders.edu.au
An ARC Special Research Initiative
martin.westwell@flinders.edu.au
@martinwestwell
@martinwestwell
93%
91%
88%
78%
95%
57%
33%
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vimeo.com/westwell/neuromyths

Catherine Scott, Senior Lecturer, Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne

Teachers haven't gone looking and found these [ideas]; they have been actively marketed to educators.
There's a lot of money to be made selling things to schools and school systems and plenty of people who are on the look out for sciency sexy sounding ideas that are easy to package and sell as 'solutions' to the 'problems' of schooling.
Researchers... are frequently also to blame because they go out and market their theories or research findings before these have been through the checking processes of science.

Doesn't matter if the idea is later disproven, if it's gotten onto the play list of those who sell things to schools it becomes immortal.
http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00429/full
Whole education systems have fallen prey to the marketing of shonky ideas. Here in my Australian state of Victoria the bureaucrats are all convinced of the usefulness and importance of learning styles and push teachers to use it. Give me strength!
You only have to google that throughly disreputable and disproven notion 'right brain-left brain' to see what I mean.
Neuromyths in education: Prevalence and predictors of misconceptions among teachers. Dekker, S. N., Lee, C., Howard-Jones, P. & Jolles, J. (2012) Frontiers in Psychology doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00429
How does Australia compare?
360
O
What do you think?
(most positive gradient)
(among most +ve gradients)
(flat but among most negative gradients)
(among most negative gradients)
The teacher explains how a school science idea can be applied to a number of different phenomena (e.g.,the movement of objects, substances with similar properties)
The teacher uses science to help students understand the world outside school
The teacher clearly explains the relevance of broad science concepts to our lives
The teacher uses examples of technological application to show how school science is relevant to society
HANDS ON
Students are required to design how a school science question could be investigated in the laboratory
Students spend time in the laboratory doing practical experiments
Students do experiments by following the instructions of the teacher
Students are asked to draw conclusions from an experiment they have conducted
INTERACTION
The lesson involved students' opinions about the topics
Students are given opportunities to explain their ideas
There is a class debate or discussion
INVESTIGATION
Students are given the chance to choose their own investigations
Students are allowed to design their own experiments
Students are asked to do an investigation to test out their own ideas
APPLICATIONS
things
processes
people
neuroscience
architecture
education
design
cog sci
"Good architects have lots of intuitions,
and that's why
good architecture
works.
learning
Prof Tom Albright
President, ANFA
(2012)
Our hope is that we can identify principles backing up those intuitions that are more deeply rooted in knowledge about how the brain works.
We'd like to be able to identify, for example, what particular elements would give you a better space for learning."
light
some blind people are aware of blue light
Vandewalle et al (2013) Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 25 12 2072-2085
Blue Light Stimulates Cognitive Brain Activity in Visually Blind Individuals
Daneault et al (2014) Sleep 37 1 85-96
Aging Reduces the Stimulating Effect of Blue Light on Cognitive Brain Functions
www.popularmechanics.com
blue light improves cognition "almost instantaneously"
effect is reduced with age
Rahman et al. (2014) Sleep 37 2 271-281
Diurnal Spectral Sensitivity of the Acute Alerting Effects of Light
blue light keeps us alert...
... and our responses can be manipulated
Revell et al. (2014) Journal of Physiology 590 19 4859-4868
Human phase response curve to intermittent blue light using a commercially available device
impact upon sleep
- NREM sleep
- proportional to amount of learning in preschoolers
Kurdziel et al (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 17267–17272
Sleep spindles in midday naps enhance learning in preschool children
- consolidation of declarative (explicit) memories
Wilhelm et al (2008) Learning and Memory
Sleep in children improves memory performance on declarative
but not procedural tasks
application
hands-on
interaction
investigations
21st Century Learners Demand Post-Industrial Education Systems
http://ow.ly/tzvAW
Dirk Van Damme,
OECD
http://ow.ly/wPge5
Flinders University, Science Innovation Learning Centre
swanbury penglase
planning
prioritising
goal setting
problem solving
switching attention
anticipating
assessing risk
decision making
error checking
acting
on plan
sticking to plan
sustaining attention
inhibiting impulses
working memory
cognitive flexibility
Executive
Functions
not acting impulsively or prematurely
holding information in mind and mentally working with it
changing perspectives or approaches to a problem, flexibly adjusting to new demands, rules or priorities
A place where young people want to be

learning the aesthetic
"homeliness"
green spaces

order
predictable
intuitive
Arndt (2012) Mind, Brain & Education 6 1 41-48
Design of learning spaces: emotional and cognitive effects of learning environments in relation to child development

stop-and-think
Sue draws a polygon.
It has a certain number of 120° angles
and the same number of 150° angles.
It has no other angles
.


The polygon is

a pentagon a hexagon an octogon a decagon
Yr 7 NAPLAN 2009 (75s)
anti-creative conditions?

long term/excessive exposure?
e.g. Carla Rinaldi
Reggio Emilia Approach
http://ow.ly/tzvqI
www.myfuture.edu.au
stop-and-think
interaction
application
OECD: educational organisation
CISCO: Internet of Everything
"best practice"
Executive functions
stop and think
knowledge & skills
OECD: pedagogy
flexible
learning
spaces
teacher-student
student-student
provision without
empowerment
functional
surfaces &
spaces
removing visual & auditory clutter
flexible furniture
e.g. lecture theatres
DEECD 2011
provision
empowerment
http://ow.ly/wZ82f
Full transcript