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Facilities Planning

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Denise Ng

on 3 July 2018

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Transcript of Facilities Planning

Facility Planning
By: Janani - Soh Hoon - Hwee Yee - Bernice - Denise
Overview
1. Facility Management
Facility Management, as defined by the IFMA:
Various disciplines together to ensure functionality of a built environment by integrating people, place, process and technology
(Miller, 2007)

Successful facility management in healthcare
Requires thorough strategic planning
Due to internal and external pressures and challenges face
(Lombardi & Schermerorn, 2007)
Aim:
ENHANCE QUALITY OF CARE FOR CLIENTS
Deliver effective and responsive services
Enable changes in the use of space in the future
Sweat the assets
make them highly cost effective
Create competitive advantage for the organization’s core business
Enhance organization’s culture and image
(Lombardi & Schermerhorn, 2007)
2. Strategic Planning
People involved in strategic planning
Review internal operations and external environment
Ensure that its practices anticipate and respond to change
Pursue development and refinement of plans that match activities with established goals
Consider multiple points of view
Consider the relationships of groups and individuals within and outside organizations
(Strickland, 2003)
Booty, F. (ed.) (2009) Facilities management handbook. Fourth edition, Oxford: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann.

Carpman, J. R. & Grant, M. A. (1993). Design that cares: Planning health facilities for patients and visitors. (2nd ed.). United States of America: American Hospital Publishing, Inc., an American Hospital Association company.

Desmyter, J., Garvin, S., Pierre-Henri, L., Stirano, F., & Vaturi, A. (2010). A Review of Safety, Security, Accessibility and Positive Stimulation Indicators. Retrieved on June 11, 2012, from http://www.ca-perfection.eu/media/files/Perfection_D14_final.pdf

ESRI. (2009). Space utilization optimization. Retrieved on June 11, 2012, from http://www.esri.com/library/whitepapers/pdfs/space-utilization.pdf

Gopee, N. & Galloway, J. (2009). Leadership and Management in Healthcare. London: SAGE Publications Ltd

Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. (2006). Planning, Designing and Construction of Health Care Facilities. United States of America: Joint Commission Resources

Lombardi, D. J. & Schermerhorn, J. R. (2007). Health Care Management. United States of America: John Wiley & Sons, Inc

Maslin, Z. B. (1991). Management in Occupational Therapy. London: Chapman & Hall

McCormack, G.L., Jaffee, E.G., & Lavey,G.M.(Eds.).(2003). The Occupational Therapy Manager. In G.M. Giles(Ed), Starting Up a New Program, Business, or Practice, pp. 193-217. USA : The American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

Miller, A. (2007). What is Facility Management. Retrieved on May 5, 2012, from http://www.bmswebsite.com/index_files/What_is_Facility_Management.pdf

Strickland, R. (2003). Strategic Planning. In C. Davies, S. Seitz & B. Dickson (Eds.), The Occupational Therapy Manager (4th ed.). United States of America: AOTA Press

Sorbello, J. G. (1991). Communicating Effectively: Up, Down, and Across Organisations. In G. H., Stevens (Ed.), The Strategic Health Care Manager: Mastering Essential Leadership Skills (1st ed.). United States of America: Jossy-Bass Inc

State Council of Higher Education for Virginia. (2004). Space Utilization and Comparison Report. Retrieved on June 11, 2012, from http://www.schev.edu/Reportstats/2004SpaceUtilizationComparisonReport.pdf?from=
FACILITIES MANAGEMENT STRATEGY
Essential aspect of professional role and contributions to practice environment
Organization goals should be met

Help in promoting and delivering quality service

Aid to link services to community needs
(Strickland, 2003)

Areas an OT considers when planning for a facility:
Space Utilization
Accessibility
Safety
Equipment
Budgeting
3. OT in Planning
SPACE UTILIZATION

Space allocation planning
Complex
Proper allocation of resources
Meet business goals
Reduce operation costs
Promote effectiveness and efficiency at workplace
(ESRI, 2009; SCHEV, 2004)

Space Utilisation Rate
A function of frequency rate and occupancy rate
Frequency – measure the proportion of time that space is used compared to its availability
Occupancy – measure how full the space is compared to its capacity
SPACE UTILIZATION

Occupancy headcount in facility
Need to meet minimum requirements of clients
Enough space for geriatric chairs
Enough space for wheelchair navigation
Support delivery of services

Need for structure to follow function but actual facilities are far from ideal most of the time
(McCormack, Jaffee & Lavey, 2003)
ACCESSIBILITY

Facilities must be
REACHABLE
Facility should be easily used and accessed by disabled people

USABLE
One where disabled people can make use of independently or with the help of a partner
(Desmyter et. al., 2010)
ACCESSIBILITY CONSIDERATIONS

Consider accessibility within center
Approach to facility center

carpark, transport stop off points, access routes

Entrance to the facility center
steps, ramps, entrance doors
Movement inside the center
Lobbies, corridors, surfaces, internal doors

Facilities within the center
toilets, eating areas, rest corner
Communication within center
Communication equipment, cognitive assistance and other devices
(Desmyter et. al., 2010)
SAFETY

Safe environment
Provide a space that is free from any danger, risk or injury for every kind of users
(Desmyter et. al., 2010)
SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS

Criteria to assess risk
Mechanical safety
Air quality
Infection control
Utility requirements and interruptions
Noise
Vibration
Emergency procedures
Fire, flood, attack
(JCAHO,2006)
EQUIPMENT

List of potential equipments required should be discussed
Size of equipment
Type of equipment
Supporting service requirements of equipments to determine space
(JCAHO, 2006)
Case Study
5. Skills, Knowledge & Attitude
CHARACTERISTICS OF A SUCCESSFUL FACILITIES MANAGER

Ability to combine knowledge and skill in estate-related matters with an understanding of organizations, people and processes.

Understanding how a building works is not the same as ensuring it is safe, secure and enjoyable for customers and/or end-users.
CHARACTERISTICS OF A SUCCESSFUL FACILITIES MANAGER

Open to learning new things
Go for Facilities Planning courses
BCA Academy hold courses on skills to ensure that the projects meet desired quality standards on time and within budget (includes facilities planning)
Learn from related fields such as architects, contractors, plumbers, etc.
Learning about MDT members needs who are sharing the space

Leadership
To lead an efficient and well-communicating facilities planning team
To ensure progress is on task
CHARACTERISTICS OF A SUCCESSFUL FACILITIES MANAGER

Effective communicator
Build good working relationship with staff, MDT and external vendors
To convey needs and ideas
Prevent conflicts that might arise
(Gopee & Galloway, 2009)

Client and staff-centeredness
To be able to plan for facilities that are necessary and beneficial to both consumers and other staff members
CHARACTERISTICS OF A SUCCESSFUL FACILITIES MANAGER

Good knowledge of client demographics
Understand client group’s needs and problems
Identify and prioritize the problems to create planning options

Good foresight
To allocate space appropriately
To leave room for improvement and amendments in the future
KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED

Basic facilities planning skills
Plan for practical designs or space allocations that caters to various needs

Ergonomics
Chair and table dimensions for clients and staff
Equipment storage
Positioning of equipment and furniture

Knowledge on latest trends and research
Value-add to organization
Green technology and energy conservation
EQUIPMENT

Can be divided into “needs and wants”
Provide services for all or almost all clients
Required for only a small proportion of client served may be appropriate for purchase later in the growth of the program
Supplies (expandable supplies) are items consumed in their use
E.g. splinting material, crayons
System needs to be in place to track supplies
So that billable items can be billed out and needed items are available
(McCormack, Jaffee & Lavey, 2003)
BUDGET
BUDGET - Fiscal Year

Budget cycle that runs for a year

Start date will be on the beginning of a quarter
January, April, July, October

Allows company to present actual financial results regularly
Able to analyze and affect results through the year
Shows investors and interested parties that progress has been made to achieve financial objectives
BUDGET - Expectations & Adjustments
BUDGET - Process
BUDGET - Process

Capital Budgeting
Budgeting for capital equipment, property, or plant changes
Regulations:
Company to set minimum cost of asset
Item to have an expected useful life
OT manager to prepare capital budget request
Determines cost, including shipping, taxes, installation etc
Justification for equipment: direct benefits
BUDGET - Cash Flow

OT manager may not actively participate in collection of billed services

Need to ensure that services are authorized correctly and provided as authorized
Ensure accurate documentation
Might need to manage expenditures more closely during times when cash is not readily available

Daily consideration in private practice OT
Delays may impact ongoing payroll and other monthly expenses
VS.
Bare minimum
State of the art
Process of formulating strategies and course of actions to accomplish goals
(Maslin, 1991)

Identify organization’s
Future goals and objectives
Strategies that will help attain the goals

Necessary and critical managerial process
For ongoing success
Availability of OT services in varied settings
(Strickland, 2003)
ACCESSIBILITY

Proportion or number of a population that uses a service or facility as a function

4 factors:
Physical
distance to facility, wheelchair access
Economics
copayment amount, insurance type
Cultural
language barriers
Others
waiting time for appointment
(Oleske, 2001)
References
Conclusion
REVISITING HOME & COMM (Office Version)
Assume that you are an OT working in a Hand Therapy Department. You have been tasked by your organization to submit a plan for your future Hands department using the space allocated for you.
REVISITING HOME & COMM (Office Version)

You will be provided a floor plan
Considerations:
Team of 6 OTs
Need to cater to A-class/non A-class patients
Others (wound care area, equipments required, reception area)
KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED

Knowledge of up to date facilities standards

Going for conferences held by accreditation organizations to be equipped with current standard

Good understanding of how to maintain compliance with accreditation process and meeting accreditation standards.
E.g. JCI executive briefing to be held 1-2 November 2012 in Singapore to provided needed tools and resources to maintain JCI approval
THANK YOU
Full transcript