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Raquel Lawrence

on 11 October 2016

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Transcript of HOW TO WRITE A PAPER

Did you get hooked? Did it catch your attention? Do you want to keep reading?
Body paragraph
The "Right Way" to Write an Essay Conclusion (via http://hubpages.com/literature/How-to-Write-the-Conclusion-of-an-Essay)
Helping your reader understand why your subject matters…

The answer lies in clearly understanding the real purpose of a conclusion. The main arguments and details of whatever subject you have written about have already been covered in the introduction and body of the essay. The conclusion is your opportunity to show the reader why it matters by answering the question, “So what?”

The challenge before any good writer, however, is to take the subject they are given, regardless of their own personal interest in it, and dig for the deeper meaning it holds—to answer the question, “So what?
The strongest, most universal way to approach this question is to tie what you have written about to bigger, more universal ideas. Relate what you have written to the universal human experience.

The first sentence of your conclusion (or the first paragraph, in the case of long papers) should acknowledge what you have written about in the paper thus far. Essentially, summarize what the essay was about in one sentence. Do not summarize it point by point. The rest of the paragraph should then work to connect the ideas presented thus far to the big ideas of the universal human experience that are more directly relevant to the reader.

By writing your conclusion paragraph in this way, your readers will begin to see that you have the ability to take your opinion or what you have learned and connect it. Readers of all kinds will notice a significant improvement in the quality of your writing, and they will begin to value your thoughts and feelings—they will see not only why your essay matters, but why you matter as well.
Conclusion Sample:
As you can see, Abraham Lincoln accomplished a great many things during his presidency of the United States. Woven through each of his accomplishments, however, was a single theme—the theme of unity. He sought always, through his speeches and his leadership style, to strengthen the sense of unity among those around him. He worked not only for the preservation of a divided country but for the preservation of the divided human spirit. As we struggle today with an increasingly global society, it might serve us well to remember the actions and decisions and life of this simple, humble man. Perhaps we should listen with a new kind of seriousness to those words that he honored not only within his most famous speech, but also by the way he lived his life: that “…all men are created equal.”
Include a hook in your introduction!
Personal Experience

So what is a thesis statement exactly? via http://www.finaldraftedits.com/blog/how-to-write-a-thesis-statement

It is the central point of your paper, your paper's purpose defined, and your point of view on a subject. A thesis statement is a one sentence explanation of why you are writing the paper, without explicitly saying, "Here is the reason is why I am writing this paper."

Your Thesis Should:

Argue a point and State a claim
Be the last sentence of your introduction

Introduction Example:
Punch, Punch, Punch, Mark, Mark, Mark. It seems ever since we have had a vending machine at the school, I have made more marks on character cards for students being late then ever before.
Vending machines should not be allowed in schools as they are a distraction to students, provide unhealthy choices for our students, and have too many limitations with their contracts. We need a new alternative to fundraising for our playground.

Did you start with a transition?

Do you have a topic sentence?

Do you have details to support this idea?

Did you include quotes/elaboration?

Full transcript