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J perry, bain, meredith, and mo

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by

Nicolas Prontka

on 16 September 2012

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Transcript of J perry, bain, meredith, and mo

Formalist/Rhetorical Criticism By: Mohammadali Naraghi, Cameron Bain, John Perry, and Ben Meredith ‘How he haunts this forest, and carries a book with him a big, heavy book, with iron clasps; and how this ugly Black Man offers his book and an iron pen to everybody that meets him here among the trees; and they are to write their names with their own blood; and then he sets his mark on their bosoms. Nathaniel Hawthorne, the author of the Scarlet Letter, uses similes to convey his idea of sin as the theme of the novel. This is clearly explained when the author says, “The door of the jail being flung open from within there appeared, in the first place, like a black shadow emerging into sunshine, the grim and gristly presence of the town-beadle, with a sword by his side, and his staff of office in his hand,” (Hawthorne 45-46). In this particular simile, the door of the jail is compared to a black shadow emerging into the sunshine. The black shadow represents Hester’s sin and the sunshine represents the entire town and Hawthorne uses the comparison to show the ripple effect with which her sin had on the small tight nit Puritan community. In the Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne uses symbolism to bring to light his theme of human deficiency . Hawthorne uses the scarlet letter to represent the way Hester feels about her sin. When Hester first emerges from the prison, her letter is described as “in fine red cloth, surrounded with an elaborate embroidery and fantastic flourishes of gold thread, appeared the letter A”. (Hawthorne 46) This shows that Hester is not afraid of confronting her indiscretion and does not regret it . The town people see that she is using her scarlet letter as a symbol and instead say “ill bestow a rag of mine own rheumatic flannel, to make a fitter one!”. (Hawthorne 47) This reveals how much Hester and the towns people’s opinions contrast. This is one of the main reasons Hester becomes such an independent thinker and making her the first American Heroine.
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