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Rods and Cones

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Mandila Kuku

on 29 November 2015

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Transcript of Rods and Cones

Rods and Cones
By: Mandila Kuku
November 24th, 2015

What is the Functions of Rods and Cones
Thier role are very specific: to recieve and process singals of light and color, which gives us color.
What are Rods and Cones
Rods and cones are cells that are light- senstive of the retina in the human eye.
What happens when cells die?
When the cells die in the back of the eye, you can blind in less than a week.
Where is it Rods and Cones Located
The rods and cones are located everywhere in the
retina expect in or near the fovea
What is a Rod
A rod are responible for vision at low light.
They have a low spatial acuity which means they can't detect shapes.
They don't dectect light as sharlpy as cones.
What is a Cone
A cone is a at high levels of color.
They are capable for high color vision and high spatial acuity
They are 3 types of cones which are the short-wavelength sensitive cones, the middle-wavelength sensitive cones and the long-wavelength sensitive cones.
Rods and cones
Africian River Blindness


(www.geteyesmart.com0
Africian River Blindness is an eye condition that can happen after being infected by a particular parasite. People who are infected by this parasite usually have other symptoms before any blindness happens, especially itching and bumps in the skin.
www.hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.org
(www.hyperphysic.phy-astr.gsu.org)
www.ehow.com
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