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Linguistics Project

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by

Connor Gray

on 26 March 2015

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Transcript of Linguistics Project

Twitter Lingo
What is Twitter?
A social media platform that has become one of the leading sites in mass communication. The general idea is that an individual publishes a post but must be succinct enough to fit in 140 characters or less.
WORD NO. 1: TRENDING
Examples:
"The Nicki Minaj's Pinkprint Tour is trending on Twitter!"
A Journey through the Twitter vernacular in 140 characters or less.
PHONOLOGY:
Pronunciation:
/trendiNG/
MORPHOLOGY:
Gerund phrase, where the
noun "trend" became a
verb to imply the process of becoming a trend.
SYNTAX:
Noun: Trends
Twitter updates their trends list.
Transitive Verb: Trending
#UNT18 was trending on Twitter.
Adjective: Trending
Llama Watch was a trending topic on Twitter last month.
USAGE:
Spoken and Written

SEMANTIC: Old Def.
1. to extend in a general direction : follow a general course
2. to veer in a new direction
3. to show a tendency
4. to become deflected
SEMANTIC 2:New Def.
now derives to the process of becoming a pop cultural phenomenon. In context of Twitter, the trending topic is in high frequency among tweets.
Examples:
"I'm so sick of my roommate's subtweets."
PHONOLOGY:
"tweet"- onomatopoeia
from a bird noise
MORPHOLOGY:
Contains prefix: sub-
can mean or relate to under, below, or beneath (e.g. submarine, substandard) can also mean secondary or partial.
SYNTAX:
Noun:
Did you see my subtweet about my ex?
Verb:
I can't believe my ex subtweeted about me.
USAGE:
Spoken and written

subtweets often contain the hashtags:
#subtweet or #oomf [one of my followers
SEMANTIC: Old Def.
sub- under, beneath
tweet- a chirping note
SEMANTIC 2:New Def.
A shorthand for a subliminal tweet. Refers to a status update on Twitter that is covertly addressed to a specific individual without handle of the recipient.
WORD NO. 2: SUBTWEET
Examples:
PHONOLOGY:
Sounds like "at"

MORPHOLOGY:
symbol representing the word "at" as shorthand. @ features the first letter of the word.
SYNTAX:
PREPOSITION
I'll be @ the store
(less frequent, just for shorthand)
VERB
Just @ me and I will back!
(in reference to social media)


USAGE:
Restricted to written form. You can speak it, but the meaning isn't as obvious to the symbol.
SEMANTIC: "at" Def.
expressing location or arrival in a particular place or position.
expressing the time when an event takes place.
denoting a particular point or segment on a scale.
expressing a particular state or condition.
emphasizing the directing of an action toward a specified object.
expressing the means by which something is done.

SEMANTIC 3: Virtual "@"
used in speech to indicate the sign @ in e-mail addresses, separating the address holder's name from their location. It maintains the sense
of direction, but reserved for virtual reality
WORD NO. 3: @
Examples:
PHONOLOGY:
/fyo͞od/
MORPHOLOGY:
SYNTAX:
Noun: feud
Iggy's feuds are hilarious.
Verb: feuding
Banks is always feuding with people.
USAGE:
More commonly spoken, but also written.
SEMANTIC: Old Def.
SEMANTIC 2:New Def.
A highly publicized and
glamourized argument/tiff with two prominent figures in the media.
WORD NO. 4: Feud
By: @say_hey_gray, Connor Gray
Follow:
@say_hey_gray
Follow:
@say_hey_gray
Desktop Version
Mobile Version:
Friends
Mutual Followers
Celebrities
Companies
Fan Pages
Humor Blogs
Professional Pages
News/Fact Sites
Entertainment
Tweets can come from:
Left Shark
The Dress
#TheDress also known as What Color Is This Dress?:
refers to a post in which viewers had to decide the color of a dress to be either: white and gold, or blue and black. This launched an internet wide debate in the last week of February with competitive hashtags #whiteandgold and #blackandblue
#leftshark: One of the background dancers during
Katy Perry's performance of "Teenage Dream" during the Super Bowl XLIX. During the perfomance, the left shark was seen screwing up the routine.
Early February
"Who Is Beck?":

On February 8th, Beck won Album of the Year at the 57th Grammy Awards, beating Beyoncé's self-titled album BEYONCE.
Supporters of Beyoncé, including
members of the media, celebrities, and her following, BeyHive protested Beck's win prompting the twitter phrase "Who is Beck?" as a swing to Beck's lack of notoriety in the last few years. Fans even took to editing his Wikipedia page and creating a national petition online. The biggest oppositon was during the protest itself when Kanye jokingly went up on the stage to interrupt Beck's speech (a throwback to the 2009 VMA's when Kanye interrupted Taylor Swift who had beat Beyoncé in best video)

History of @:

Theories suggest that it was first used by monks looking for shortcuts while writing manuscripts. They would combine letters in the Latin word for towards,"ad." They would use the "d" as a tail for the a (1300-1600)
Then merchants started using it to mean "at the rate of"
(e.g. 12 bottles @ $5). This increase in popularity made it a keystroke for the typewriter.
The technological use
started in the 1970s when computer scientist
Ray Tomilson needed to find a symbol that would program a computer to connect and send a message to other computers in a network. He picked it because he was looking for a less used symbol.
@
With BBN Technologies, Tomilson essentially developed the first prototype of email. @ became associated with address from that moment on. As e-mail developed, the @ sign remained a keystroke in the format. Social media platforms like Twitter, Instagram, and less frequently, Facebook began to utilize it as an address to a handle/username/avatar.
SEMANTIC: 2 "@"
A shorthand to represent the word "at." Typically written.
Particularly used in the sense of direction:

I am @ the store w/ Becky.

SEMANTIC 3: Twitter "@"
Used to serve as the vocative (direct address) of
a username, indivual, avatar, or handle for an account on a form of social media (esp. on Twitter.) It can also relate to the process of following or subscribing to an account. "@" allows to tag someone in a post.
a state of prolonged mutual hostility, typically between two families or communities, characterized by violent assaults in revenge for previous injuries.

take part in a prolonged quarrel or conflict.
SEMANTIC 3: Twitter
A hostile disagreement typically between celebrities in the Twittersphere.
Iggy Azalea VS.
Azealia Banks
Khole Kardashian VS.
Amber Rose
Iggy Azalea VS.
Papa John
Amanda Bynes vs. Mostly Everyone
SOURCES:

Formal Dictionaries Used:
Google's Official Dictionary
Dictionary.com
Merriam Webster's Online

Slang/Trend Dictionaries:
Urbandictionary.com
knowyourmeme.com

Twitter

The Accidental History of the @ Symbol:
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-accidental-history-of-the-symbol-18054936/?no-ist=
Full transcript