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The Colosseum

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by

Bunny P

on 30 May 2014

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Transcript of The Colosseum

What was the Colosseum?
A long time ago, Emperor Vespasian, a member of the Flavian family, started the construction of the Colosseum in 72 AD, and was completed in 80 AD. This massive building was mostly used as an arena for recreational and entertainment purposes. It was usually a place for people to come and watch gladiatorial fights.
What is the Colosseum?
The Colosseum

Origin
According to
The Roman Colosseum
, gladiatorial fights hadn’t always been public entertainment. They had begun as an Etruscan religious ritual. The Etruscans believed that a dead person’s soul was shed it its honor. In wartime, blood was provided for the souls of the comrades killed in battle by forcing the captured enemy soldiers to fight to the death. This Etruscan custom was adopted by the Romans.
Reflection
I think that the main reason that I chose this topic was because I think that it was interesting to learn about the great building in Rome that was used for gladiators to fight to the death, it was interesting to see what the Romans did for recreation and entertainment. I think the Colosseum was a famous building that intrigued me, I wanted to look into it more.
Another Fun Fact!
Although amphitheaters were built throughout the Roman Empire, none were as large and grand as this. The name was derived from the Colossus, a large bronze statue of Nero, standing near it. It provided good visibility for the more than 50,000 spectators who viewed animal games, spectacles, and gladiatorial combats there.
What was it used for?
According to
The Roman Colosseum
, slaves, prisoners of war, and criminals were slaughtered in the colosseum for the entertainment of over 50,000 cheering fans. Gladiatorial fights were held for the gruesome people who found interest in these things.
Some more information...
As said in "http://www.aviewoncities.com/rome/colosseo.htm",the building is immense, measering 188m by 156m and reaching a height of more than 48m. The magnificent structure was dressed in marble and 160 larger-than-life statues graced the arches on the upper floors.
The colosseum could hold 50,000 spectators who entered the building through 80 entrances. Above the ground are four stories, the upper story contained seating for lower classes and women.

By Bunny
The Colosseum, also known as the Flavian amphitheater, is a large building in Rome, Italy. You may have heard of the popular tourist attraction. It's kind of weird how people find interest in old buildings. Today, it looks like a part of it has been chopped off.
Fun Fact: Marble and metal were taken from the Colosseum for use in later buildings.
Bibliography
Mann, Elizabeth. The Roman Colosseum. New York: Mikaya, 1998. Print.
"Colosseum." , Rome. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2014. <http://www.aviewoncities.com/rome/colosseo.htm>.
"Images of the Colosseum, Rome, 72-80 CE." Images of the Colosseum, Rome, 72-80 CE. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2014. <http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/romancolosseum/romancolosseum.html>.
"Roman Colosseum." GreatBuildings. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 May 2014. <http://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/Roman_Colosseum.html>.

Image Credits
http://www.inspireyourway.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/1.jpg
http://benjaminjprince.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/colosseum-2.jpg
Full transcript