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Winter Free Verse Poetry Assignment

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by

Joel Malley

on 18 December 2012

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Transcript of Winter Free Verse Poetry Assignment

Winter Poems Now, time to do some writing What is Free Verse? Definition The Power of "I" Examples Now that I have you reminiscing... Your earliest winter or holiday memory... Your Task: Write a free verse poem exploring a winter or holiday memory. Draw this arrow. Guidelines The Assignment This week we'll draft, word process and publish these poems craft as ornaments. 20-30 lines*
Focus on diction, details, and imagery
No end rhyme allowed!
(But, you are welcome to use alliteration, onomatopoeia, internal rhyme)
(You are also welcome to use simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole etc.) This is your life. Write for five minutes.
Use as many sense details as you recall.
Use your Five Senses! Sight, Sound, Smell, Touch, and Taste (SSSTT) -- give your memories body.
It is okay to exaggerate, distort, or exclude whatever you'd like -- sometimes poet exaggerate or distort in order to come closer to the truth. List 10-12 other holiday or winter memories. Tis the season, of course... Copy this into your in class journal: Copy this into your journal from Marcus Millsap: School Day Afternoon
I climb the steps of the yellow school bus,
move to a seat in back, and we're off,
bouncing along the bumpy blacktop.
What am I going to do when I get home?
I'm going to make myself a sugar sandwich
and go outdoors and look at the birds
and the gigantic blue silo
they put up across the road at Motts'. from “To a Daughter Leaving Home”

When I taught you
at eight to ride
a bicycle, loping along
beside you
as you wobbled away
on two round wheels,
my own mouth rounding
in surprise when you pulled
ahead down the curved
path of the park, from "The Summer I Was Sixteen"

The turquoise pool rose up to meet us,
its slide a silver afterthought down which
we plunged, screaming, into a mirage of bubbles.
We did not exist beyond the gaze of a boy.

Shaking water off our limbs, we lifted
up from ladder rungs across the fern-cool
lip of rim. Afternoon. Oiled and sated,
we sunbathed, rose and paraded the concrete,

from "Traveling through the Dark"

Traveling through the dark I found a deer
dead on the edge of the Wilson River road.
It is usually best to roll them into the canyon:
that road is narrow; to swerve might make more dead.

By glow of the tail-light I stumbled back of the car
and stood by the heap, a doe, a recent killing;
she had stiffened already, almost cold.
I dragged her off; she was large in the belly. birth present age 12 A B C Label your chart.
A. This is your earliest holiday or winter memory.
B. This is an important or your favorite holiday or winter memory.
C. This is an unresolved or confusing holiday or winter
memory.
Brainstorm one item for each. Your favorite or an important winter or holiday memory. Write for five minutes.
Use as many sense details as you recall.
Use your Five Senses! Sight, Sound, Smell, Touch, and Taste (SSSTT) -- give your memories body.
It is okay to exaggerate, distort, or exclude whatever you'd like -- sometimes poet exaggerate or distort in order to come closer to the truth. A confusing or unresolved* childhood memory Write for five minutes.
Use as many sense details as you recall.
Use your Five Senses! Sight, Sound, Smell, Touch, and Taste (SSSTT) -- give your memories body.
It is okay to exaggerate, distort, or exclude whatever you'd like -- sometimes poet exaggerate or distort in order to come closer to the truth. * You remember but you're not quite sure why. Or, you can't figure out what it means in your life. * rough guidelines, not set in stone Free verse is poetry that doesn’t have a regular rhythm, line length, or rhyme scheme. It relies on the natural rhythms of speech. Today it is the form of poetry that most American poets prefer. Free-verse poetry invents and follows its own forms, patterns, and rules. First person experiences need a first person. Make sure your I is present and thinking, feeling, seeing, acting. Give your readers someone to be with. Find your voice as a poet. Wave your I flag in your poetry. Making a Fist
For the first time, on the road north of Tampico,
I felt the life sliding out of me,
a drum in the desert, harder and harder to hear.
I was seven, I lay in the car
watching palm trees swirl a sickening pattern past the glass.
My stomach was a melon split wide inside my skin.

"How do you know if you are going to die?"
I begged my mother.
We had been traveling for days.
With strange confidence she answered,
"When you can no longer make a fist."
Years later I smile to think of that journey,
the borders we must cross separately,
stamped with our unanswerable woes.
I who did not die, who am still living,
still lying in the backseat behind all my questions,
clenching and opening one small hand.
- Naomi Shihab Nye Winter Poem
once a snowflake fell
on my brow and i loved
it so much and i kissed
it and it was happy and called its cousins
and brothers and a web
of snow engulfed me then
i reached to love them all
and i squeezed them and they became
a spring rain and i stood perfectly
still and was a flower
- Nikki Giovanni You might also refer to your copy of "The Summer I Was Sixteen," "Travelling Through Dark" or "To a Daughter Leaving Home" as examples of first person, free verse poems. Minilessons The Rule of "So What?" THEME Good writing has a "so what." A purpse, a point, a reason it was written. A theme. Writers look for meaning, significance, and the implications in the subject he or she has chosen. Sometimes shouted, sometimes whispered. Conclusions: End Strongly The conclusion often conveys the poem's deepest meaning. It will leave reader with a feeling, idea, image or question. Some strategies:
try echoing, or repeating a significant line
surprise your reader, and yourself
experiment with multiple last lines Cut to the Bone Revision Poetry is the art of compression.
- Robert Wallace
I know a poem is finished when I can't find another word to cut. - Bobbi Katz When the poet can't find another word to cut, a poem is done. Weigh every line and every word: Does it do anything for your poem? Does a smart reader need it? Get rid of fluff, extra words, redundancies, distractions, etc.
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