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Political Cartoons 7th US

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by

Mrs. Aiello

on 1 December 2015

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Transcript of Political Cartoons 7th US

Political Cartoon
What is a Political Cartoon?
A political cartoon is an illustration which is designed to convey a social or political message.
What is the Goal of a
Political Cartoon?
The goal of a political cartoon is to send a clear message, using images which will be familiar to all of the people in a society.
Artistic Devices
Definition:is an artist’s way of using different details when drawing a political

Examples:
Important People
Symbols
Exaggerated details
Labels
Voice or thought bubbles
Captions
Questions to Consider:
Class Example
1. What is happening in the cartoon?



2. What artistic devices does the illustrator use?



3. What do you think is the message of this political cartoon?
The "founding editor" is reviewing Thomas Jefferson's version of the Declaration of Independence
Thought bubbles
Symbols
Captions/Labels
Important People (Thomas Jefferson)
Thomas Jefferson's definition of "men" intended to only mean men who were white, wealthy, and owned land
Political Cartoon # 1-
“How the Branches of Government Interact”
1. What is happening in the cartoon?



2. What artistic devices does the illustrator use?



3. What do you think is the message of this political cartoon?
The three branches of government and they are discussing what their responsibility is if there is an open seat in the Supreme Court
The Three Branches of Government have different powers (separation of powers) and have Checks and Balances.
Symbols
Captions
Voice Bubbles
Labels
Political Cartoon # 2-
“Struggling New Nation”
1. What is happening in the cartoon?



2. What artistic devices does the illustrator use?



3. What do you think is the message of this political cartoon?
The “Young Nation” looks torn and weak with broken crutches which are labeled “the Articles of Confederation” and is standing next to a pile of “useless money.”
After the War, the US is weak and the Articles of Confederation does not support the US to establish a new government. The paper money during this time is useless because the colonies are not unified as one nation yet.
Symbols
Exaggerated details
Labels
Voice Bubbles
Political Cartoon # 2-
“James Madison's Bill of Rights”

1. What is happening in the cartoon?




2. What artistic devices does the illustrator use?



3. What do you think is the message of this political cartoon?

A colonial man is addressing James Madison about his underwear as James Madison is drafting the Bill of Rights
James Madison is expressing his “freedom of expression” which is guaranteed in the First Amendment in the Bill of Rights
Important People
Symbols

Exaggerated details
Labels

Voice Bubbles
Captions

"A cartoonist is a writer and artist, philosopher, and punster, cynic and community conscience. He seldom tells a joke, and often tells the truth, which is funnier. In addition, the cartoonist is more than a social critic who tries to amuse, infuriate, or educate. He is also, unconsciously, a reporter and historian. Cartoons of the past leave records of their times that reveal how people lived, what they thought, how they dressed and acted, what their amusements and prejudices were, and what the issues of the day were."
(Ruff and Nelson)
Full transcript