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The Arab Springs

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Jason Mordukhovich

on 9 December 2014

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Transcript of The Arab Springs

The Arab Spring
DIGITAL COMMUNICATION
The exchange of information electronically
DIGITAL COMMUNICATION
After analyzing more than 3 million tweets, gigabytes of YouTube content and thousands of blog posts, a Washington University study found that Social Media played a central role in shaping political debates in the Arab Spring
Conclusion
What Is The Arab Spring?
Traditional government censorship was no longer effective. The younger more educated population learned how to circumnavigate traditional security measures put in place by the Middle Eastern governments by using proxies to mask geographic locations of network traffic and using third party DNS servers such as the 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 DNS server provided by Google.
The Arab Spring was a series of anti-government protests, uprisings and armed rebellions that spread across the Middle East. But their purpose, relative success, and outcome remain severely disputed in Arab countries, among foreign observers, and between world powers.
DIGITAL COMMERCE
What the Arab Spring hasn’t done – at least not so far – is to bring about positive changes in the economies and social development in the North African and Middle East nations whose politics it most transformed.
The IMF (INTERNATION MONETARY FUND) estimates Arab Spring nations would need more than $160 billion over the next three years to jump start their economies – this at a time when they are in political turmoil and commodity prices are rising.
DIGITAL
The buying and selling of goods electronically.
COMMERCE
Review of Digital Communication, Commerce & Security.
DIGITAL SECURITY
"I've always said that if you want to liberate a society, just give them the Internet," Wael Ghonim
The Facebook page "We Are All Khaled Said" was created when Khaled Said, a businessman in the Egyptian city of Alexandria was beaten to death by police as retaliation for him posting a video of police sharing drugs after a bust. Many Facebook users used Khaled Said’s photo as their profile picture as a form of social protest. The Facebook page quickly grew and it now remains one of the biggest Facebook pages in Egypt with hundreds of thousands of users. This page has also helped to outreach to other populations and expose what is going on.
http://www.najm.fr
http://selfdeprecate.com/politics-articles/editorial-social-medias-impact-communication/
DIGITAL SECURITY
In August of 2011 there was a study published by Harvard University as a result of surveying 98 bloggers from the Middle East and Northern Africa regarding their security practices.

The study asked participants about the security measures that they were taking to protect themselves and to mitigate the risk from online activities.

Surprisingly few respondents regarded security factors in their blogging platforms despite their concerns.

The study also found that while many respondents believed themselves to be highly competent with basic security practices many when tested were not, and even less actually implemented what they knew.
Social Networking Platforms
Blogging and Microblogs
Source - http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/sites/cyber.law.harvard.edu/files/OnlineSecurityintheMiddleEastandNorthAfrica_August2011.pdf
Sources




http://www.homelandsecurity.org/docs/reports/Implications_from_Arab_Spring_on_HS.pdf

http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/sites/cyber.law.harvard.edu/files/OnlineSecurityintheMiddleEastandNorthAfrica_August2011.pdf


http://www.psmag.com/navigation/politics-and-law/the-cascading-effects-of-the-arab-spring-28575/

http://www.visamiddleeast.com/me/common/include/uploads/ecommerce_apr2013.pdf

http://www.gwu.edu/~ieresgwu/assets/docs/ponars/pepm_159.pdf

https://www.westminster.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/220675/WPCC-vol9-issue2.pdf

http://www.academia.edu/2578601/The_Role_of_Social_Media_in_Arab_Spring

http://www.netcom-journal.com/volumes/articlesV263/Netcom343-356.pdf

http://www.ssrresourcecentre.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Anderson-Demystifying-the-Arab-Spring.pdf

http://cmes.hmdc.harvard.edu/files/final-arab-spring-fact-sheet-3.pdf

http://www.csae.ox.ac.uk/workingpapers/pdfs/csae-wps-2011-23.pdf

http://cima.ned.org/sites/default/files/CIMA-Arab_Social_Media-Report_2.pdf

)http://www.kovasboguta.com/uploads/4/7/9/5/4795292/egyptinfluencenetworklarge.gif


http://smallwarsjournal.com/jrnl/art/what-the-arab-spring-tells-us-about-the-future-of-social-media-in-revolutionary-movements

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/pierre-omidyar/social-media-enemy-of-the_b_4867421.html
Digital communication was a major tool of the Arab Spring.
Social Media such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube accelerated social protest.
Users of Facebook and Twitter were very effective in organizing protests and revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt that they were actually described as Twitter/Facebook revolutions
DIGITAL COMMUNICATION
SOURCES:
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