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Tymia McNeil

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Tymia McNeil

on 14 April 2016

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Transcript of Tymia McNeil

Tymia McNeil
http://www.vibe.com/2013/12/opinion-justine-sacco-casual-racism-and-victimhood/
Summary One
In the article, Sexist Ad Campaign Reminds Women They're Nothing More Than Objects, written by Alanna Vagianos, Vagianos states the analytical opinions from other people that had negative vibe towards the jewelry line, I love Ugly Jewelry.Vagianos adds that not only is this fashion line unhealthy, but it is also very sexist towards the woman body. Additionally, she points out the contrast in the two models in the fashion line's picture. She shows how the male models are fully clothed, but the women models are naked. She warns, however, that the National Council of Women for New Zealand stated that the clothing line is something that she is very dissapointed in. Vagianos adds that "It reflects how too often women in our society are seen as merely sexual objects and this feeds into our culture of abuse and violence against women. As a brand that targets young men, they should be doing more to promote healthy attitudes.” Ultimately, Last Vagianos seeks to point out the negativity that the clothing line, I Love Ugly Jewelry is promoting.
http://boingboing.net/2013/12/20/the-tweet-heard-round-the-worl.html
I think that this satire would be very interesting for me to write about. It shows the amount of incorrectly interpretations that people could encounter from this, what is supposed to be "innocent", tweet.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/07/13/yikes-controversial-emnew_n_112429.html
This image is a very intriguing image to write about. It shows the ways that society can negatively look at it. There has always been so many controversial topics in Obama, this is simply just one to add the books.
Summary of Bene Viera's opinionated article
In the article Opinion: on Justine Sacco, Casual Racism, and Victimhood, written by Bene Viera, Viera argues the controversial topic on if Justine Sacco should be seen as to be a victim behind a racist tweet that was not so innocent. Viera adds that Justine Sacco did not intend on keeping the racist tweet private, because if that would have been her intentions then her page would have been private. Additionally Viera points out that society is overlooking the real problem when it comes to Justine's tweet. Society is treating Justine as if she is the victim of this whole situation. Viera warns, however, that Justine had no right in any type of way to post such a disgusting tweet. Viera states that "the only victims in this scenario are all of the Africans suffering from the devastation of HIV/AIDS who had to read Justine’s racist tweet and continue to live with their circumstances." Ultimately, Viera seeks to reveal Justine Sacco as being the hypocrite that she really is rather than allowing her to play the victim.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/sexist-i-love-ugly-ad-campaign-reminds-women-they-are-objects_us_5661a889e4b072e9d1c5bbf5
http://www.dailylife.com.au/news-and-views/dl-opinion/stephen-colberts-ching-chong-ding-dong-joke-20140330-35rpx.html
This particular tweet shows the racist joke that an individual innocently posted, but the question that I would like to ask is, was the tweet really deemed to be racist? This is a tweet that I feel would be really interesting to touch basis on.
I really like the question about genre and author's intent---that's a good move to a theoretiical lens! For any of them, make sure you look to what collations show up in both the original satiire and misunderstandings, as we id in class today with "Dear Student!"
Justine fell on her own sword
Should've known better, beacuse she is a top Pr executive.
Justine should have omitted her name
Why tweet a racist tweet when your employer is in twitter bio?
Tweet was ignorant
Not a joke
YES BUT...Victim ?
Justine is not the victim
Public Shaming
Cyber bullying
Fully clothed mean
Naked woman's body
National Council of Women for New Zealand: "disappointed
Women as seen as mererly sexual objects
"Sexist as hell"
Do more to promote healthiness
"Do better next time...much better.
Sexist campaign
Fully clothed men
Naked women
Woman body becomes a prop and a back drop.
http://www.dailylife.com.au/dl-fashion/fashion-coverage/sexist-ad-campaign-uses-womens-bodies-as-props-20151207-glhtm7.html
Company's response: Still sexist: Naked man, fully clothed woman
"I Love Ugly's attempt to equalise the field by depicting a naked man's torso, touched by a woman – as a form of role reversal – doesn't negate how offensive and shocking the original images are."
Not equal

Dehumanizing
adding another layer of sexual violability.
Summary Two
In the article, "Sexist ad campaign uses women's bodies as props", written by Kathleen-Lee Joe, Joe deems to state the negatives that are within New Zealands new fashion line. Lee Joe adds that women's bodies are used for props and backdrops instead of being used for what its really is, a "model". Additionally, she points out that the new clothing line's campaign is very sexist. She warns, however, that the I Love Ugly Jewelry campaign reduces a woman to a sum of her parts. She adds that "You never see her face, effectively erasing her individuality, dehumanizing her and adding another layer of sexual violability. All that matters is her body. And that in itself is misogyny." Ultimately, Joe seeks out to point out the sexism and the level of low tolerance of respect that the I Love Ugly Jewelry has on women and their bodies.
go ahead and cite properly since you'll have to eventually!
ok--this is not an analysis of a context, but rather seems a misunderstanding of te tweet, (or maybe the reaction to it?). Remember you probably don't want articles about Sacco (last name only as you refer to her!) bc you are asking a larger question about the contex and how they might shape ways in which the satire was musunderstood.
One context this might add for you is victimhood and who can/can't be considered a victim...
see notes on other summary. also, need to choose one of these satires sometime soon :)
Rosen Article
Thrives on paradoxes
"the satirist will typically claim to speak “from the heart”
"Satire is crafted, or wrought"
Satire can be a form of comedy
Satire "has its own dynamics that may or may not coincide with what satirists claim they want to achieve."
"the comic elements within satire frequently undermine what purports to be its serious import."
"Critical history of satire even up to our own time has tended to oscillate between two polarities."
Temptation to take what the author says "at face value" (into consideration)
Suspicion about the comedy of satire
What is the purpose of satire..."Can one ever be certain that satire has, or strives for, actual—as opposed to purported—meaning"
Satire is supposed to "teach", " but its didactic program is continually compromised or even undermined by the competing demands of comedy"
What kind of entertainment is satire
"The last thing they are trying to do—and this is especially the case with political satire—is to subordinate content to humor."
What are satirists trying to accomplish?
"Satirical efficacy ends with laughter"
"Despite the obvious fact that no one would ever actually mistake a satirist for a serious political analyst."
Stewart made "it especially difficult at times for audiences to separate his comedic from his real-life persona", whenever it same to satire it was hard to distinguish the two.
Data Dump
Topic and Diction
What words/phrases/ideas/data/images keep coming up, either in volume or in important places
Satire, unstable, and satire being viewed as a comedy
What words/phrases/ideas/images/data get opposed to each other, either directly, or through implication?
The statement, " Satire is crafted, or wrought, in other words, no matter how much the satirist insists that it is not", this statement can be used to create a great yes but arguement. It correlates well with my two examples of articles on my topic.
Claims/Tone/Point of View
Are there markers that insert the author or his/her views into the conversation?
"Once again, we find ourselves circling around the question of meaning: can one ever be certain that satire has, or strives for, actual—as opposed to purported—meaning". This statement not only states a yes and in this situation with correlating with my examples, bu it can also be used as an yes but.
Are there markers that emphasize a main point? Look for conjunctions like “thus,” “therefore,” “in conclusion,” “most importantly,” and “finally,” and verbs like “proves,” “claim,” “argue,” and “demonstrate.”
Are there markers that emphasize a main point? Look for conjunctions like “thus,” “therefore,” “in conclusion,” “most importantly,” and “finally,” and verbs like “proves,” “claim,” “argue,” and “demonstrate.”
Yes, in both my examples, and in the Rosen article, the authors uses certain terms to empasize on the overall main point.
Structure and Evidence
Are there markers that indicate Yes ANDS, or repetition? Look for words like “further,” “additionally,” “and,” “because,” and “moreover.”
Yes. In my examples and also in the Rosen article, the authors uses words such as "because", and "and". These terms are great for helping point the signifucant Yes ANDS.
Are there markers that indicate YES BUTS, or binaries? Look for words like “however,” “in “contrast to,” yet,” and “but.”
Yes. Throughout both my examples and in the Rosen article.
Rosen Summary
article, so quotation markks, not italics
ok, these are very broad sments. your follwoing sentences are way, way more detailed--they're what I want to see!! like we did with Booth, collate from these so whats to get a more precise/specific mega so what
In
Efficacy and Meaning in Ancient and Modern Political Satire: Aristophanes, Lenny Bruce, and Jon Stewart,
Ralph M. Rosen acknowledges how satire can easily be misunderstood. He states that satire is wrough. Rosen adds that satirists can be confusing to understand because they can be seen as a form of comedy, instead of being purposeful and significant . Additionally, he points out that an audience doesn't know whether to know if the speaker's intention are to be taken as an objective move, or to be taken as a satirical comedic joke. He warns, however, that "satirical efficacy ends with laughter rather than persuasion or education, even if satirists craft their work as if the opposite is the case." Ultimately, Rosen deems to state the intentions and goals that a satitrist tends to aim for, and he also deems to state the ways to recognize whether a satire is meant to be seen as a comedy or to be taken seriously.
yes--what are these? build the answers to this into the body of your summary!!
HW: 2/15/16
Irony in the picture
astonishing communal achievement.(Booth's article)
I Love Ugly Jewelry didn't achieve.
B/c their reader (audience) didn't have confidence that they are moving "together in identical patterns"
Booth- "The reader is to reject the literal meaning."
In this case the audience rejected the fashion line's literal overall meaning.
Booth and Satire
Rosen's article- "the desire to please an audience".
I Love Ugly Jewelry was trying to please their audience by appealing to sex.
"how political satire never fails to ruffle feathers among those who perceive themselves to be its targets" (Rosen)
The fashion line was offensive to a lot of people who are against sex in advertisements w/ using women.
YES BUT: Rosen says that some satirists can be seen as a form of comedy, but the I Love Ugly Jewelry wasn't seen as a comedy.
Society acknowledged a different interpretation of I Love Ugly Jewelry's ad.
"Poe’s Law and invocations of it regard a peculiar difficulty in media communication and interpretation." Akin)
From the naked woman to the fully dressed man, the whole ad was misinterpreted.
Does the company, I Love Ugly Jewelry, believe in what they have communicated in their ad?
"some communicative acts are functionally ambiguous, there will be confusion surrounding their interpretation" (Akin)
Rosen and Satire
Akin and Satire
Booth Application
• What conditions, influences or events causes the audience to misunderstand the I Love Ugly Jewlry's ad to be as it is? How or why did it become what it is?
***USE TEMPLATE TO FIX THIS QUESTION...TOO BROAD
Data Collation Template
yes--good self correction!! the collation template will take some of your great work above about a particular reasoning in how people present satire and pair that with specifics from either the I love ugly jewelry ad itself, or a particular misunderstanding of it--that will lead to a great, focused applictaion!
--
Satire
I Love Ugly Jewelry
The fashion line, I Love Ugly Jewelry, uses women body parts as prompts to create a sexual visual image through advertisement to appeal to their audience.
Satire Summary
Collate analytical article
Fully clothed mean
Naked woman's body
National Council of Women for New Zealand: "disappointed
Women as seen as mererly sexual objects
"Sexist as hell"
Do more to promote healthiness
"Do better next time...much better.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/sexist-i-love-ugly-ad-campaign-reminds-women-they-are-objects_us_5661a889e4b072e9d1c5bbf5
Sumary of this article
In Sexist Ad Campaign Reminds Women They're Nothing More Than Objects, Alanna Vagianos states the analytical opinions from other people that had a negative vibe towards the jewelry line, I love Ugly Jewelry Vagianos adds that not only is this fashion line unhealthy, but it is also very sexist towards the woman body. Additionally, she points out the contrast in the two models in the fashion line's picture. She shows how the male models are fully clothed, but the women models are naked. She warns, however, that the National Council of Women for New Zealand stated that the clothing line is something that she is very dissapointed in. Vagianos adds that "It reflects how too often women in our society are seen as merely sexual objects and this feeds into our culture of abuse and violence against women. As a brand that targets young men, they should be doing more to promote healthy attitudes.” (Sexist Ad Campaign Reminds Women They're Nothing More Than Object) Ultimately, Last Vagianos seeks to point out the negativity that the clothing line, I Love Ugly Jewelry is promoting.
Make an application
What conditions, influences or events caused I Love Ugly Jewelry to use women as an object? How or why did the body of image of women become what it is? The author, Alanna Vagianos, of Sexist Ad Campaign Reminds Women They're Nothing More Than Objects, focuses on the negative actions that the fashion line, I Love Ugly Jewelry, creates. She argues the way the fashion line merely uses just the body of a woman and hides her face. Additionally, the influences from the media of other campaigns caused I Love Ugly Jewelry to use women in an explicit way. The fashion line acted in such a way to attract the attention of people that are easily sexually appealed to women and their bodies. This connection between Alanna Vagianos’ article in the context and I Love Ugly Jewelry sexist appeal satirist advertised picture changes our understanding of the cause of the misunderstanding by highlighting the focus on I Love Ugly Jewelry sexist appeal in Alanna Vagianos’ article on the provocative fashion line, which may cause those reading the satire to easily misinterpret some variation of what the fashion line was really trying to present.
In “How to Get “Kissably Close”: Exanimating how Advertisers Appeal to Consumers’ Sexual Needs and Desires”, Tom Reichert and Jacqueline Lambiase deem to both show how advertisers uses sex to attract and appeal to their audience. Reichert and Lambiase, adds that these sex appeal advertisements serves the purpose to grab the attention of society to buy the product that is being advertised. Additionally, they both point out that majority of advertisement and marketing books state that in order for an ad to be successful it has to be both attention getting and motivating. They also warn, however, that “ad professionals are taught that campaigns should be fresh and innovative so that they stand out among the clutter” (How to Get “Kissably Close”: Exanimating how Advertisers Appeal to Consumers’ Sexual Needs and Desires) Ultimately, Reichert and Lambiase yearns to showcase the reasons to why advertisers use sexual images and sexual contact to appeal to society.
Sex appeals
Attracts audience
Sometimes sexual appeals are viewed as decorative eye candy or sensational and shocking, to attract readers’ attention.
Use this collation to help w/ summary
Collate these two
Make an application using this as a starting point; also use collation template and collate together
Who is the audience for the fashion line, I Love Ugly Jewelry, in attention seeking as opposed to appealing to sex and using women as sexual objects? What is the audience’s expectations, and how are those expectations addressed? The comments from the audience of I Love Ugly Jewelry argues that the fashion line could have used something else to catch the attention of their audience. The audience hesitantly commented on an advertisement without actually taking the time to investigate the history and background of the fashion line, which caused an uproar between the two. Referencing back to Booth, Booth states that our overall understanding of satire and irony can initially change our view points and understanding of the outcome of a situation. This is exactly what the audience of I Love Ugly Jewelry did. The audience of this advertisement was deemed to be an audience that is attracted to advertisements that give off a sexual vibe, which makes it very easy and understandable to why an audience may misinterpret the purpose of the ad. This connection between seeking attention as opposed to appealing to sex in the lens of using women as sexual objects points out the misunderstanding of the overall satire, which changes our understanding of the cause of the misunderstanding by highlighting the focus on the audience and their assumptions and using women as sexual objects, which may cause those reading the satire to better understand the purpose of why companies use women to seek the attention of potential buyers.
Booth’s text is surprisingly like the satirical advertisement that was posted by a fashion line, I Love Ugly Jewelry in terms of the purpose of the advertisement as a whole. By this, I mean that Booth’s overall outcome of this text is to change how readers interpret information that is given by the author. Booth states some of the different ways of how an audience can easily misunderstand the real meaning behind a satire. This holds the same truth in the advertisements of the I Love Ugly Jewelry fashion line, because in terms of the audience of the fashion line, they seemed to misinterpret what I Love Ugly Jewelry was trying to imply about their products. The audience interpreted that I Love Ugly Jewelry was trying to appeal to sex, whereas I Love Ugly Jewelry was simply trying to catch the attention of their audience. Noticing this pattern of reasoning suggests that it is easy for an audience to get the wrong assumption of a satire because like Booth stated, the pleasure of the speed of understanding the message behind a statirical form of irony is “why irony is such a powerful weapon”. (A Rhetoric of Irony) This statement is also a part of this collation because it fulfills an explanation behind why audiences tend to not fully understand what an author is truly trying to say.
Next jump in w/ another collation/summary from different article
Secondly, in Taking It Off All Over Again: The Portrayal of Women in Advertising Over The Past Forty Years, Courtney Carpenter and Aimee Edison argues how over the past decades advertisement using female models has dramatically changed in such a negative way. Carpenter and Edison adds that the levels of sexual attraction in today’s advertisement is vigorously increasing. Additionally, they both point out the different statistical measurements between the estimate of difference within the amount of clothing of female and male models. They also warn, however, that “this enormous discrepancy in the level of dress between male and female models indicates that women are portrayed much more often as sexual objects than are men.” (Taking It Off All Over Again: The Portrayal of Women in Advertising Over The Past Forty Years) Ultimately, Carpenter and Edison both seek to show how women are portrayed in a sexual exploiting way, and how men are portrayed in a total different stance.
Collate this article w/...
In “Poe’s Law, group polarization, and argumentative failure in religious and political discourse”, Scott F. Aikin acknowledges the laws of Nathan Poe, Akin states that if someone believes or resorts to Poe’s Law in any form of discussions then they are saying that some content that is provided on the web is indistinguishable as a form of an imitation of something, meaning that they are appealing to the argument of that what is posted on the internet is being viewed as an imitation of something, or it is being seen as a literal satire. He says that one can always find another source that states the same exact thing as the first source did, which makes them believe that the satire is true. Aikin adds that a person is hypothetically going to believe what they believe regardless of what the accurateness of the evidence says. Additionally, he points out that believing in Poe’s Law means that you reject the fact that you can accept what you read. He warns, however, that “in order for two speech acts to be indistinguishable as sincere or parodic, there must be no overt hints of parody or humor”. (“Poe’s Law, group polarization, and argumentative failure in religious and political discourse”) In other words, there has to be a point at which the satire/speaker states that they are trying to act as a parody or if they are trying to be humorous. Ultimately, Aikin’s seeks to remind us that it is fine to believe what we want to believe, just make sure that we have supportive evidence to back up what it is that we believe.
Scott F. Aikin’s article is surprisingly similar to the advertisement posted by I Love Ugly Jewelry in terms of reasoning. By this, I mean that the reasoning to behind why the readers/audience of a satire may misinterpret its true meaning is because there was no indication of a certain tone. This holds some truth in what Aikin’s was acknowledging in his article, he states that it is hard to understand what a satirist is trying to say if there is no marker of evidence that they are serious or not. Noticing this pattern of confusion of a satire, Aikin says that one should follow the laws of Nathan Poe, because Poe’s law states that parodies are sometimes indistinguishable from sincere expressions. This is also a part of this collation because it states the reasoning to how the audience of I Love Ugly Jewelry misunderstood the satire itself.
**add more w/ collating article
What is the significance of a satirist inputting some sort of indication that what they are saying is serious or if it is not? Would it cause a different outcome from the audience? Referencing back to Aikin’s article, if I Love Ugly Jewelry would have had some sort of indication that their advertisement was not meant to be taken serious then maybe their audience would have had a different outcome. If an audience is not told where they are being led then the audience is going to have their own assumptions, whether they are accurate assumptions or whether they are false assumptions. This connection between Aikin’s article in the lens of the audience of I Love Ugly Jewelry misunderstandings of the satire changes our understanding of the cause of the misunderstanding by highlighting the focus on putting more emphasis on the evidence that the audience is provided with, and the indication of some sort of markers like stated in Aikin’s article, which may cause those reading the satire to grasp a more sufficient idea on the overall advertisement of the fashion line, I Love Ugly Jewelry.
Application
Go to next article (analytical)
Lastly, in “Sex, Feminism, and Advertising: The Politics of Advertising Feminism in a Competitive Marketplace”, Suzy D’Enbeau states the argument behind the ideal that “sex sells” D’Enbeau adds that women are showed in a demeaning manner. Additionally, she points out that this type of action has been seen to be fraught that starts up a huge contradiction. She warns, however, that “women are more likely than men to be objectified and that sex appeals in ads typically operate within a Western patriarchal framework that subordinates women”. (Sex, Feminism, and Advertising: The Politics of Advertising Feminism in a Competitive Marketplace) Ultimately, Suzy D’Enbeua seeks to show how sex appealing towards women in advertisement is degrading them.
What does the statement “sex sells” mean? The author Suzy D’Enbeau focuses on how women are showcased in advertisements. Additionally, D’Enbeau argues that women are used in a demeaning manner. She uses the term, sex sells, meaning that in order for an add to become popular it has to catch people’s attention, and the best way to do that is by selling the image of a naked woman’s body. Sex is one of the most popular controversial topics, so why not hit a home room with using women to sell an ad, because in the end “sex sells”.
Collate w/ theoretical article
In “Efficacy and Meaning in Ancient and Modern Political Satire: Aristophanes, Lenny Bruce, and Jon Stewart”, Ralph M. Rosen acknowledges how satire can easily be misunderstood. He states that satire is wrought, meaning that is out of context. Rosen adds that satirists can be confusing when it comes to understanding what it is that they are trying to imply. Satirists can sometimes be seen as a form of comedy, instead of being purposeful and significant with what it is that they are trying to actually say. Additionally, he points out that an audience doesn't know whether the speaker's intentions are to be taken as an objective move, or to be taken as a satirical comedic joke, because the speaker may come off as if they are trying to be sarcastic which can be seen as a form of comedy. He warns, however, that "satirical efficacy ends with laughter rather than persuasion or education, even if satirists craft their work as if the opposite is the case." Speakers tend to always end their satires with a tone of laughter even if it is not their intentions to do so. Ultimately, Rosen deems to state the intentions and goals that a satirist tends to aim for, and he also deems to state the ways to recognize whether a satire is meant to be seen as a comedy or to be taken seriously.
Ralph’s article is surprisingly like the fashion line, I Love Ugly Jewelry in terms of the use and purpose of the advertisement as a whole. By this, I mean that Ralph acknowledges the use and purpose of how an audience can easily take a satirical statement to be comedic, because speakers tend to have that effect of coming off as to be more of a joking vibe than as a serious vibe. This is exactly what the audience of I Love Ugly Jewelry did. Noticing this pattern between the two, the audience behind I Love Ugly Jewelry did not know whether or not the company was being sarcastic. They got the assumption that the company was being sarcastic and that is why they used a woman’s body to help advertise their brand of products. Ralph also states that “satirists will claim that what they say matters more than anything else, but tacitly understand that how they say it is, in fact, even more critical.” (“Efficacy and Meaning in Ancient and Modern Political Satire: Aristophanes, Lenny Bruce, and Jon Stewart”) This is also a part of this collation because it precisely fulfills that there is some truth behind a comedic satire when an author states it. In reference to I Love Ugly Jewelry, the fashion line advertised an image of a naked woman’s body with a fully clothed man, this yet alone makes the audience form a question of “are they being realistic here are they being sarcastic?”
**Use this collation to add on w/ collating article...make stronger
What are the common assumptions about a company using women’s bodies to appeal to sex for advertisements? Should the assumptions be taken as if they are trying to be sarcastic or serious? Referencing back to the comments and outlooks on I Love Ugly Jewelry’s advertisement, their audience did not take that advertisement as if it were meant to be sarcastic. They took it as if they were being serious, or incompetent to women and their feelings. These are the common assumptions that any audience would have gotten. I Love Ugly Jewelry’s intentions could have been to be sarcastic in a way that it would catch the attention of potential buyers, but their audience obviously didn’t get that impression. This connection between advertisements that appeals to sex in the lens of I Love Ugly Jewelry, presents the misunderstanding of the satire, which changes our understanding of the cause of the misunderstanding by highlighting the focus on how a satire can sometimes be wrought in advertisements appealing to sex, which may cause those reading the satire to contain a more appropriate assumption of why companies use women’s bodies for their advertisements.
Write a mega so what. Make sure to collate everything into one.
surprising ways/methods advertising use sex/ outcomes
violence and sexuality and race in New Zealand
race and sexuality in New Zealand (maori)
sexulaity/race+ vioence
+satire/misunderstandings
rosen's emphasis on what an audiience focuses on will help us understand why the audience focuses on

SNL
"Beyonce is black"
• To what extent does SNL form a thought of confusion which makes the audience misinterpret their video?
• To what extent does this picture give a thought of misinterpretation?
• To what extent does Justine Sacco give her audience a thought of confusion when she posts this post?
• To what extent does I Love Ugly Jewelry make their audeinec misinterpret their reasoning behind their post?
I can continue with my original satire from paper, and begin to elaborate even more on the overall misunderstandings that took place.
I Love Ugly Jewelry
• Why does racism have to be placed in comedic atmospheres to surface in the goal of accomplishing a satirical topic?
http://0-hpq.sagepub.com.bravecat.uncp.edu/content/14/5/643.full.pdf+html
Exploiation
Racism
Prejudice
"Media can either perpetuate,or challenge prejudice"
Deconstruct media images on race
In Questioning
Black Humour’ Racial Exploitation, Media and Health
, Darrin Hodgetts & Ottilie Stolte acknowledges rascim, and human exploitation of racism that takes place in the media. Hodgetts and Stolte adds that media may sometimes portray itself as a place that exemplifies racism or "racialization. Additionally, they both point out that racism is not something that just pooped out of the mid air, but it is a factor that contributes to our everyday life. They also warn, however, that the media plays a big role in influencing racism in society. They both add that "we need to not lose sight of the fact that people often ignore, criticize or simply overlook racist representations. Ultimately, Hodgett and Stolte both yearn to point out the destruction from the media that seems to play a big role in racism in today's society.
Summary
Summary Revision 1
In Questioning Black Humour’ Racial Exploitation, Media and Health, Darrin Hodgetts & Ottilie Stolte acknowledges racism, and human exploitation of racism that takes place in the media.
Hodgetts and Stolte both state that the media plays a big leading role into racism and the human exploitation of racism.
Hodgetts and Stolte adds that media may sometimes portray itself as a place that exemplifies racism or "racialization.
They both acknowledges that the relationship between racism and the media is that they both contain support and condemnation for racism.
Additionally, they both point out that racism is not something that just pooped out of the mid air, but it is a factor that contributes to our everyday life. They also warn, however, that the media plays a big role in influencing racism in society,
and that it raises the level of both prejudice statistics and the statistics of racism itself and how it affects society.
They both add that "we need to not lose sight of the fact that people often ignore, criticize or simply overlook racist representations. Ultimately, Hodgett and Stolte both yearn to point out the destruction from the media that seems to play a big role in racism in today's society.
I added a leading introduction sentence to let my audience see why I placed the following sentence there.
Added a so what, because I don't want to leave my audience in confusion to why Hodgett and Stolte say what they say about the media.
Added a comma to lead into an explanation of what exactly and how exactly the media begins to play a role in society. Also in how it influences society.
http://0-jci.sagepub.com.bravecat.uncp.edu/content/36/1/44.full.pdf+html
Postracialism
Humor
Critical
Dialogue
Exaggerates
Refrains
Summary for 2nd Article
In Deconstructing Postracialism: Humor as a Critical, Cultural Project, Jonathan Rossing argues that humor that takes place within the media acts as a critical cultural project for racism. He states that it creates a dead end in public discourse for a lead way to racism. Rossing adds that postracialism can cause tension, which can sometimes overlook discrepancies and social failings. Additionally, he points out that humor enlightens a voice for the ignored and unspoken people when it comes to racism. He warns that "humor, however, provides a starting point to provoke reflection and action and a compelling complement to “serious” discourse". Ultimately, Rossing deems to change societies' overall thinking when it comes to portraying racism by using humor.
nice!!
great direction--i could see even one more sentence about _how_ thatrelationship supports and how it condemns--just a tad mors of those so whats!!
ok, like we have practiced in class, don;t just pull out one word--see what other terms get connected, ask what category they fall into and what they say about that category--this will make your summaries much more specific, as ou're working towards!!
really nice! i could se a bit more what for each of these excellent so whats, drawn from the detailed collations--this will set up your argument later!!
Post-Soul Satire Black
In Post-Soul Satire, Derek Maus and James Donahue acknowledges the different point of views i essays from well known satirists. Maus and Donahue adds that racist satire has found its way within and outside of the black community. Additionally they bothe point out that these specific works are called "black posts", and they exemplify a "New Black Aesthetic". They also bothe warn however that these types of actions make African American satirists feel constrained. They state that "african American satire engages in a broad ranging critique that exposes fraudulent, outdated, absurd, or otherwise damaging mindsets and behaviors both within and outside the African American community". Ultimately Maus and Donahue both deem to change our overall thinking on the way racist satires are interpreted
african american satirists
Constrained
Fradudelent
Outated
Absurd
Black community
good start! like we have practiced in class, don;t just pull out one word--see what other terms get connected, ask what category they fall into and what they say about that category--this will make your summaries much more specific, as you're working towards!! It will also set you up for success in the paper, since you will have realy specific claims to fuel your thinking!
you're right, they introduce the whole collection, but focus on the points they make about what we need to understand about satire the black community--thta is, why we need this collection
this should be your focus, and needs more what (collations taht define these) and so what (why they matter)
nice what and so what here!!
This article is helpful in towards trying to find a stable apprehensive answer to why racism is always seemed to be placed in comedic atmospheres, so that it can surface in accomplishing the goal of a satitrical topic.
Application w/ surprising collation
• What is the effect of postracialism and humorous satirical racism? How does it achieve that effect? What details contribute to the overall effect? Might it have different effects on different audiences?
Postracialism and humorous satirical racism has a negative effect on society as a whole. The inappropriate jokes that a lot of comedic shows make are an insult to not only the black race, but also to every race that has a standing opinionated view on race. This circumstance of unhealthiness achieves the overall affect of keeping racial views in society, instead of trying to contribute to eliminating it. Comedy shows, talk shows, movies, etc. tends to play a big role in this negative effect. This action may have different outcomes on different audiences, because some may not believe in taking a stand on racism and the satirical jokes that are playing a part in it.
3/30/2016
What are the various opinions about race in satirical humor dealing with particular shows like SNL
Their are various opinions about race in satirical humor that are typically centered around comedy shows, such as Saturday Night Live. Saturday Night Live creates a lot of skits that deals with racism. These types of skits form standing opinions from society. Standing opinions, which are made with negative intentions that interfere with the elimination of race. Opinions with bad intentions helps to circulate the problem to a higher extension.

Racist satirical humor that SNL presents causes an opinionated debate on whether or not race should be in the same category as humor. This action brings about opinions that are perceived from a racial stance. A racial stance that does not agree with the contemplation of satire and race. Race is something that should not be taken lightly, therefore it should not be used in comedic atmospheres.

Does my sources connect well with my encounter, and is my encounter surprisingly complex?
Paper 2 Plan / Rough Draft
In what ways does racism have to be placed in comedic atmospheres to surface in the goal of accomplishing a satirical topic?
Introduction paragraph that explains a well sypnosis of the answer to the encounter
In
Questioning Black Humour’ Racial Exploitation, Media and Health
, Darrin Hodgetts & Ottilie Stolte acknowledges racism, and human exploitation of racism that takes place in the media. Hodgetts and Stolte both state that the media plays a big leading role into racism and the human exploitation of racism. Hodgetts and Stolte adds that the media may sometimes portray itself as a place that exemplifies racism or "racialization”. They both acknowledge that the relationship between racism and the media is that they both contain support and condemnation for racism. Additionally, they both point out that racism is not something that just popped out of the midair, but it is a factor that contributes to our everyday life. They also warn, however, that the media plays a big role in influencing racism in society, and that it raises the level of both prejudice statistics and the statistics of racism itself and how it affects society. They both add that "we need to not lose sight of the fact that people often ignore, criticize or simply overlook racist representations. Ultimately, Hodgett and Stolte both yearn to point out the destruction from the media that seems to play a big role in racism in today's society.
D, Hodgetts, and Stolte O. "Questioning 'black Humour': Racial Exploitation, Media and Health." Journal of Health Psychology 14.5 (2009): 643-46 4p. CINAHL Plus with Full Text. Web. 20 Mar. 2016.
Collate with another text
In
Black-faced, red faces: the potentials of humour for anti-racist action
, Scott Sharp ans Maria Hynes focuses on everyday racism and the incidents that take place in racism. Sharp and Hynes both acknowledges that racist jokes seem to be one of the major incidences that takes place in this incidental factor. Sharp and Hynes add that these offensive jokes, rejects society’s social norms and it begins to police the boundaries of the social body. Additionally, they both point out how humor seems to let actors in the media, get away with racist jokes. It allows them to masquerade with the cliché quote of “it is just a joke. They both warn, however, that this form of action can form a weak confrontation, which may create a form of anti-racist action. They both also add that “humor can operate as a form of everyday racism precisely because it involves an act of de-commitment; the user can always hide behind the claim that he or she is only joking.” Ultimately Sharp and Hynes seek out to show the negativity that takes place in everyday racism.
Sharpe, Scott, and Maria Hynes. "Black-faced, Red Faces: The Potentials of Humour for Anti-racist Action." Ethnic and Racial Studies 39.1 (2016): 87-104. PsycINFO. Web. 20 Mar. 2016.
What conditions, influences or events caused the standing opinions in race that takes place through satirical jokes to be as it is in relations to SNL? How or why did it become what it is?
There are many different conditions, influences, and or events that cause the standing opinions in race which takes place through the risk of satirical jokes, as in Saturday Night Live, to be as it is now. Saturday Night Live creates different stances of opions, because of the outcome that is percieved in their skits, which is racism. Racism takes a tole in SNL's skits, which causes a sense negativity to influenece society and how they view racism. Referencing back to what David Hodgetts and Ottilie Stolte stated, social media supports condemnation towards racism. Social media exemplifies and refrains the cause instead of trying to help eliminate the downfall, therefore, in this case is racism. It also causes an exaggeration on the effects that post racialism seems to have on society which acts through the media. Exaggeration, as in critically insulting a particular race just to make a not so humorous joke.
Deconstruct media images on race
"Media can either perpetuate,or challenge prejudice"
Exploiation
Racism
Prejudice
Postracialism
Humor
Critical
Dialogue
Exaggerates
Refrains
• What is the effect of racist satirical humor that takes place in comedic atmospheres, such as Saturday Night Live? How does it achieve that effect? What details contribute to the overall effect?
The overall effect that racist satirical humor that typicalluy takes place in comedic atmoshpheres, such as Saturday Night Live, seems to have a negative effect on society as a whole. This action become something that is acted on, but is not seen as a big deal. In the same matter as to what Scott Sharp and Maria Hynes stated, society has taken advantage of racist satirical humor jokes. They confide in using the cliche line of "it is just a joke". How many times does society have to state the racist jokes, until they learn that it is not humor but instead it is an action that is used to keep racism alive.
Their are various opinions about race in satirical humor that are typically centered around comedy shows, such as Saturday Night Live. Saturday Night Live creates a lot of skits that deals with racism. These types of skits form standing opinions from society. Standing opinions, which are made with negative intentions that interfere with the elimination of race. Opinions with bad intentions helps to circulate the problem to a higher extension. Referencing back to what Derek Maus and and Donahue stated, racist satirical causes a negaive outlook on not only the b lack community, but also on society as a whole.

Racist satirical humor that SNL presents causes an opinionated debate on whether or not race should be in the same category as humor. This action brings about opinions that are perceived from a racial stance. A racial stance that does not agree with the contemplation of satire and race. Race is something that should not be taken lightly, therefore it should not be used in comedic atmospheres.

In
Post-Soul Satire: Black Identity after Civil Rights
, Derek Maus and James Donahue acknowledges the different point of views in essays from well-known satirists. Maus and Donahue adds that racist satire has found its way within and outside of the black community. They both argue the fact of how this action of racism causes a negative outlook on not only the black community, but on society as a whole. Additionally they both point out that these specific works are called "black posts", and they exemplify a "New Black Aesthetic". They also both warn however that these types of actions make African American satirists feel constrained. They state that "African American satire engages in a broad ranging critique that exposes fraudulent, outdated, absurd, or otherwise damaging mindsets and behaviors both within and outside the African American community". Ultimately Maus and Donahue both deem to change our overall thinking on the way racist satires are interpreted
Maus, Derek C., and James J. Donahue. Post-Soul Satire: Black Identity after Civil Rights. Jackson, MS: UP of Mississippi, 2014. Xxiii, 316 Pp. MLA International Bibliography. Web. 20 Mar. 2016.
Post soul satire
black idenity
racist satire
Negative outlook
enagages in broad critique
African American community

Way black satire is interpreted
society as a whole
What are the various opinions about race in satirical humor dealing with particular shows like SNL, and how are these opinions seen as misunderstandings?
Postracialism
Humor
Exploiation
Racism
Prejudice
Collate these two collations together
reasoning of critical dialogue=
reasoniung
+
yiur text
more precise defn
In what ways does "The Day Beyone Turned Black" help us understand teh particular effects of post racial humor in media about race itself?
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