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Run-on-sentences/Fragments/ Comma Splices

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Helena Lee

on 8 December 2013

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Transcript of Run-on-sentences/Fragments/ Comma Splices

Run-on-sentences/Fragments/ Comma Splices
Helena Lee & Eva Wang

Q 1. Which of the followings is NOT the right way to fix a sentence fragment?
a) add a subject or a verb
b) add a conjunction
c) attach another sentence
d) take away the word that make it as a sentence fragment
References
Q 1. What are run-on-sentences?
A: Run-on-sentences are two or more sentences that are incorrectly combined into one sentence.
Q 2. Where can we find a run-on-sentence?
A: A run-on-sentence is usually found in some essays.
Q 3. How to fix a run-on-sentence?
A: Write the two independent clauses as separate sentences using periods. Or use semicolon, comma or a conjunction to fix the sentence.
Q 4. When do people make this mistake?
A: People make this mistake, when they want to express two ideas in one sentence.
Q 5. Why do we use a semicolon or comma to separate the sentence?
A: We use semicolon or comma to separate the sentences because semicolon and comma are usually used to connect two sentences together.
Quiz~~
Q 2. How can you fix this run-on-sentence?
"Jenny is a student she goes to UBC."
Run-on-sentence:
I like apples I also like bananas.
(It's a run-on-sentence because
I like apples
and
I like bananas
are two sentences.)
Fragment:
I woke up early. So I went to school faster than usual.
(This is a fragment because both of the sentences are incomplete.)
Comma splice:
Katherine was going to play badminton, she was sick.
(It is a comma splice because this sentence is missing a conjunction.)

Run-On-Sentences
Q 3. What kind of sentence is this?
"She is cute, she is very annoying."

a) Run-On-Sentence
b) Sentence Fragment
c) Comma splice
Q 4. Which of the followings is a correct sentence?
a) I hate chocolate I also hate candies.
b) It was raining yesterday. So I got a cold.
c) He likes coke, but he doesn't like diet coke.
d)
Q 1. What are sentence fragments?
A: Sentence fragments are sentences that require a subject, require a verb, or is an incomplete idea.
Q 2. Where can we find sentence fragments?
A: We can find sentence fragments in stories or essays written by the people who don't know how to fix it.
Q 3. How can sentence fragments be fixed?
A: Sentence fragments can be fixed in 3 ways: adding a subject or a verb, attaching another sentence, and taking away the word that make it a sentence fragment.
Q 4. When do people usually make this mistake?
A: This mistake usually happens when people are not familiar with grammar, so they always forget the parts of a sentence.
Q 5. Why can't we have sentence fragments in our essays?
A: That's because sentence fragment is a wrong example of a sentence.
Q 1. What are comma splices?
A: Comma-splices are sentences that have two or more main clauses joint with a comma, but without
a coordinating conjunction.
Q 2. Where can you find comma splices?
A: Comma-splices can be found in essays.
Q 3. How can comma splices be fixed?
A: Comma splices can be corrected by using a period, semicolon, coordinating conjunction, subordinating conjunction, or conjunctive adverb.
Q 4. When do people usually make this mistake?
A: When people got messed up by two similar ideas and they don't know if they are suppose to be in one sentence or not, so they just use a comma to separate the ideas.
Q 5. Why are comma splices very understandable?
A: Comma splices are very understandable because people always think of two similar ideas as one, so they sometimes mistaken and write the two sentences together.
Examples!
Rule to Remember!!
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/what-are-run-on-sentences?page=all
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/runons.htm
http://www.chompchomp.com/rules/csfsrules.htm
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/comma-splice?page=all
Fragments
Comma Splices
Full transcript