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Atticus Finch

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Stephanie Race

on 12 December 2012

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Transcript of Atticus Finch

Atticus Finch Different Interperatations Stephanie Morgan Kaleb Strength & Self-Restraint Courage Demonstrated in To Kill a Mockingbird "Shows you can fight without being physically abusive" (Santos)
He shows self-restraint when he walks away from Bob Ewell after Bob spits in his face. “courageously refused to cower before the prejudice of the townspeople, instead defending the man he knows is innocent.”(Werlock)
Atticus didn't back down against what he believed was ethical and right Atticus Finch is all the things that a father should be; he is strict, but fair, respected, and understanding. Showed many morals through the story
Believed in fairness and justice
Didn't back away from defending Tom even when it was against his town neighbors. By: Morgan McBride, Stephanie Race, Jacob Verhulst, & Kaleb Wolters "It's a sin to kill a mockingbird" Jordan Work Cited Metress, Christopher. "The Rise and Fall of Atticus Finch." The Chattahoochee Review 24, no. 1(2003). Quoted as "The Rise and Fall of Atticus Finch" in Bloom, Harold, ed. To Kill a Mockingbird, Updated Edition, Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations. New York: Chelsea House Publishing, 2009. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 26 Nov. 2012. Bruccoli, Matthew J., and Judith S. Baugman. "Atticus Finch." Student's Encyclopedia of American Literary Characters. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2009. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 26 Nov. 2012. Lee, Harper.Warner Books,Inc. New York, N.Y. December, 1982. Nicholson, Colin. "Hollywood and Race: To Kill a Mockingbird." In Cinema and Fiction: New Modes of Adapting, 1950–1990. Edinburgh University Press, 1992. Quoted as "Hollywood and Race: To Kill a Mockingbird" in Bloom, Harold, ed. To Kill a Mockingbird, Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations. New York: Chelsea House Publishing, 2009. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 14 Nov. 2012 Saney, Isaac. "Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird." Quoted as "Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird" in To Kill a Mockingbird, New Edition, Bloom's Guides. Bloom, Harold, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishing, 2010. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 16 Nov. 2012. Prejudice Archetype." In Bloom, Harold, ed. The Hero's Journey, Bloom's Literary Themes. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. Werlock, Abby H. P., ed. "Lee, Harper." The Facts On File Companion to the American Novel. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2006. (Updated 2011.) Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view, until you climb into his skin and walk around in it"(Lee)

Doesn't judge those around him by looks but by their character Gonzalez, ---. "Race in To Kill a Mockingbird." McClinton-Temple, Jennifer ed. Encyclopedia of Themes in Literature. New York: Infobase Publishing, 2011. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. (accessed November 16, 2012). Ware, Michele S. "Influences on Scout's Childhood." Quoted as "Influences on Scout's Childhood" in To Kill a Mockingbird, New Edition, Bloom's Guides. Bloom, Harold, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishing, 2010. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. [Accessed November 16, 2012] Jones, Carolyn. "Atticus Finch and the Mad Dog." The Southern Quarterly 34, no. 4 (Summer 1996). Quoted as "Atticus Finch and the Mad Dog" in Bloom, Harold, ed. To Kill a Mockingbird, Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations. Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishing, 1998. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. [Accessed November 14, 2012] Atticus=
Protagonist
Respected man and lawyer in Maycomb
Never called father by his children
Treats colored people equally
Is thought to be incapable of many things by his children
Single father
Nobody agrees with his decision to defend Tom Robinson Atticus Atticus shows courage by agreeing to defend Tom Robinson
Atticus shows courage by standing up to Bob Ewell and those trying to kill Tom Robinson
He shows courage by trying to get the court to look past racism Courage Justice
Bravery
Courage
Righteousness
Wisdom Character Traits Protagonist of To Kill A Mockingbird Atticus Finch Atticus grows on his children. When they find out he can use a gun, they are amazed. Their respect for him grows. They really start to appreciate what a great father they have. Jem really starts to want to follow in Atticus’ foot steps. Scout starts to see how wise Atticus is. Atticus deeply cares about his kids and it pains them when they are criticized because of him. He wants to provide his children with a good role model and he wants to teach them that you can be brave without fighting in a war. He tries to be a good parent for them and protect them. He teaches them that life is more than hunting and sports. He teaches them that there are many ways to make a difference. Effect on his children Atticus is the main protagonist in the story. He provides a good role model and demonstrates very respectable characteristics. He is consistent throughout the story. He provides the novel with a good guy to fight the evil. He becomes the hero of To Kill a Mockingbird. He represents the will to do what is right, perseverance, and courage. His children’s respect for him grows like the town’s respect for him. He makes a lasting impression on his children. He illustrates incredible wisdom and bravery. The entire novel circulates around Atticus Finch. Importance-Kaleb Atticus shows tremendous bravery by protecting Tom at the Maycomb County Jail
He stand up to Bob Ewell, yet he does not become violent
He fights for Tom Robinson even though he knows he will lose Bravery Atticus shows justice by defending Tom Robinson in court
Atticus ignores racism and other people’s opinion of him to try to give Tom Robinson justice
He wants to show his children what fighting for what is right means Justice Atticus displays the will to do what is right

Atticus→


Tom Robinson→ Atticus Finch Atticus Finch Gonzalez, Chris. "Childhood in To Kill a Mockingbird." McClinton-Temple, Jennifer ed. Encyclopedia of Themes in Literature. New York: Infobase Publishing, 2011. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. Web. Dec 11. 2012. My opinion of Atticus Finch is that he is a very good and respectable man. He is a brilliant teacher for his children and others, and a superb lawyer renowned in the entire area. He can see the good in others and bring out the good in others. He treats all with kindness and justice. Atticus Finch is an excellent role model for everyone. So, overall, my opinion of Mr. Atticus Finch is a rather good one. I like him. Opinion of Atticus-Jordan Harper Lee created a very respectable character in Atticus Finch. The readers can learn a great many valuable lessons from him.
Readers can learn from his great kindness and selflessness. He is kind to others that others are not kind to (like Tom). He is also kind to those who may not deserve it (like Ms. Dubose).
Readers can also learn from his amazing justice. As a lawyer, he understands and enforces justice better and more efficiently than most. He teaches his kids this justice by being strict and not tolerating foolish behavior. The readers can learn from and apply this and other skills to their everyday lives. Effect on the Reader(s) First and foremost, Atticus effects his children. Scout and Jem respect and depend on their father. He guides them through tough and confusing times and helps them figure what is right.
Atticus effects adult characters like Heck Tate and Bob Ewell.
He is a leader-like figure for Mr. Tate; an example of this occurs when the mad dog (Tim Johnson: RIP) is coming and Mr. Tate asks Atticus to take the shot because he didn’t trust his own shooting skills.
He has a negative effect Bob Ewell. By defending Tom Robinson, Atticus creates this negative influence on Ewell. This pushed Bob to make a murder attempt on Jem and Scout. It ended badly for Bob, however, as he got a kitchen knife between the ribs. Ouch. Effect on Characters Atticus drives the plot of To Kill a Mockingbird in several ways.
He drives the main plot involving Tom Robinson by taking his case and then making a conscious effort to defend him.
He effects the secondary plot concerning his children and their friend Dill. By consoling and guiding them, he effects their decisions, whether or not they listen to him the whole time. He tries to help them do what is right, but ultimately lets them decide for themselves. Effect on the Plot A Great Man
Who Had a Great Effect on a Semi-OK story Atticus Finch Atticus
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