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Counter-argument.

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by

Kristyn Montgomery

on 7 November 2012

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Transcript of Counter-argument.

Key Elements of a Counter-Argument Argument Take a stance and back it up with textual evidence.
Be firm with what you say! Which of these sounds
more powerful?
"I believe that Ponyboy is a hero."
"Ponyboy is a hero."
You're the writer, so it's your job to convince your reader to agree with your standpoint. As long as you speak firmly and provide evidence, you'll have a solid argument. Counter-Argument When considering your counter-argument, think of it as your way of addressing the opposing viewpoint in a way that lessens it. You're essentially saying that you know that some people believe the opposite of your opinion before they get the chance to express that opposing viewpoint. A strong counter-argument will acknowledge the key points of the opposition.

You could start a counter-argument in a number of ways, such as:
"Some may say that..."
"Others may believe..."

To be honest, a feeble counter-argument that doesn't point out the major flaws in the argument does a lot more harm than good. An excellent writer can point out the flaws in their own argument and address them intelligently. "The Turn Against" Rebuttal "The Turn Back" The rebuttal is arguably the most important part of a counter-argument. If you simply present all of the major opposing views to your argument, you might accidentally convince the reader to believe them instead of what you wrote before. Your rebuttal keeps that from happening.

The rebuttal is your answer to the counter-argument you've presented. It is your way of saying, "Sure, there are opposing views, but this is why they don't matter. This is why I'm right."

A rebuttal can begin with words like "yet," "however," "nevertheless," or "still." Argument: Team sports are great for young people.

Some may believe that team sports could intimidate children.
Some children may be physically smaller than others. Others may not be as athletic as other team members. When they cannot run as fast as other team members or are not as agile, they fear (and may receive) ridicule. However, learning to work as part of a team is essential to success in many other areas. Children have to learn to cooperate both at school and home. In school, students are expected to work together without conflict. At home, children are expected to be part of the family team and help with chores that need to be done. Example
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