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William S. Beebe

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lib hist

on 4 September 2014

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Transcript of William S. Beebe

William S. Beebe
William S. Beebe was born Feb. 14, 1841, Ithaca Tompkins County, New York, USA. He was a Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York in 1863 during the Civil War, and then was commissioned as a Regular Army First Lieutenant in the Ordnance Department. He had received the medal of Honor for his bravery at Cane River Crossing, Louisiana on April 23, 1864. He had been directed to rarely relay the orders to the officers at Cane River to attack, and to emphasize the importance of assaulting the position at once. After relaying the orders, he had offered to lead the attack twice, the first offer being turned down, the second accepted. The up coming attack took the lives of over 200 Union soldiers in a period of 10 minutes, but worked in carrying the position and driving away the Confederate troops. Lieutenant Beebe was the first man to reach the Rebel positions, and was highly honored by his commanding officers. His Medal of Honor was awarded to Will on June 30, 1897. He remained in the Ordnance Department after the end of the War, there after rising to Major. He died of yellow fever that he had picked up while serving in Cuba during the Spanish-American War.



Sacrifice
Valor
Patriotism
Honor
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