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E3: Apocalyptic Fiction

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john meehan

on 4 June 2013

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Transcript of E3: Apocalyptic Fiction

After the house, we were to see the grounds and the swimming-pool, and the hydroplane and the mid-summer flowers -- but outside Gatsby's window it began to rain again, so we stood in a row looking at the corrugated surface of the Sound.

"If it wasn't for the mist we could see your home across the bay," said Gatsby. "There, over the water," he pointed. "You have a green light that..."

"Green light?" said Daisy. "Why Jay, surely you can't be serious."

Gatsby chuckled. "It's true. You always have a green light that burns all night at the end of your dock."

"No," Daisy continued, still pointing at that fixed green orb on the horizon. "That's the chemical refinery where all those men were killed in that dreadful accident last summer. My house is over there."

Daisy put her arm through his abruptly, but he seemed absorbed in what she had just said. Possibly it had occurred to him that the colossal significance of that light had just now vanished forever. As Daisy stepped inside to the powder room, Gatsby pulled me close and handed me a large photograph of an elderly man in a yachting costume.

"Who's this?"

"That? That's Mr. Dan Cody, old sport."

The name sounded faintly familiar.

"He's dead now. He used to be my best friend years ago."

I was confused.

"I think it may have had something to do with that green light over the Sound, old sport. I want you to check it out for me..." After the house, we were to see the grounds and the swimming-pool, and the hydroplane and the mid-summer flowers--but outside Gatsby's window it began to rain again, so we stood in a row looking at the corrugated surface of the Sound.

"If it wasn't for the mist we could see your home across the bay," said Gatsby. "You always have a green light that burns all night at the end of your dock."

Daisy put her arm through his abruptly, but he seemed absorbed in what he had just said. Possibly it had occurred to him that the colossal significance of that light had now vanished forever. Compared to the great distance that had separated him from Daisy it had seemed very near to her, almost touching her. It had seemed as close as a star to the moon. Now it was again a green light on a dock. His count of enchanted objects had diminished by one.

I began to walk about the room, examining various indefinite objects in the half darkness. A large photograph of an elderly man in yachting costume attracted me, hung on the wall over his desk.

"Who's this?"

"That? That's Mr. Dan Cody, old sport."

The name sounded faintly familiar.

"He's dead now. He used to be my best friend years ago." Original Text Adapted Text deleted lines in white new lines in white cataclysm a momentous and violent event marked by overwhelming upheaval and demolition. An event that brings great changes. WHEN WILL I BE BLOWN UP? "Our tragedy today is a general and universal physical fear so long sustained by now that we can even bear it. There are no longer problems of the spirit. There is only the question:



Because of this, the young man or woman writing today has forgotten the problems of the human heart in conflict with itself which alone can make good writing because only that is worth writing about, worth the agony and the sweat.

He must learn them again. He must teach himself that the basest of all things is to be afraid..." - William Faulkner
Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech (1950) post-apocalyptic fiction writing that deals with human life and society's attempts to rebuild after a cataclysmic event. dystopian future a community or society that is in some important way undesirable or frightening. It is the opposite of a utopia. The Assignment: APOCALYPTIC FICTION This could be... ZOMBIES
DEMONS
ALIENS A KILLER VIRUS
A NUCLEAR WAR
A DEADLY METEOR You will work alone and with groups to re-write excerpts of the stories we read this year, adding some elements of apocalyptic fiction.

These additions should change some of the elements of the work (setting, mood, tone, etc.), but the essence of the original work must be present.

You must add original dialogue. JIM WAS AN ALIEN What if Huck was on the run because and it was illegal to be caught transporting them because aliens were considered "property?" APOCALYPTIC FICTION addresses the basic fears of mankind and our inevitable destruction by asking the question "WHAT IF...?" Revisit one of the works that we have covered this year and revise it to incorporate some element of... SUMMONED A DEMON What if Tituba's witchcraft had actually and the girls weren't just faking it when they claimed to be suffering from the spirit's evil effects? ACTUAL GHOSTS What if Willy Loman was haunted by that no one else but him could see? And what if his suicide was a direct result of this horrible trauma? A NAZI ZOMBIE What if Sylvia Plath's father was Hell-bent on her destruction? How would that change the shape of her life and her poetry? WHAT DO YOU FEAR? WHAT DO YOU FEAR? and how will the world end? and how will the world end? "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" - Mark Twain "The Crucible" - Arthur Miller "Death of a Salesman" - Arthur Miller "Daddy" - Sylvia Plath We will present and/or perform these stories aloud. CREATIVE BRAINSTORM CREATIVE BRAINSTORM NOVELS Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Ethan Frome
October Sky
The Great Gatsby
Independent Research Paper Text PLAYS The Crucible
Death of a Salesman SHORT STORIES and FICTION A Good Man is Hard to Find
A Kidnapped Santa Claus
A Mystery of Heroism
A Rose for Emily
A Worn Path
An Occurance at Owl Creek Bridge
Coyote Finishes His Work
Hills Like White Elephants
John Henry SPEECHES, ESSAYS, and NON-FICTION A Narrative of the Captivity
A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas (excerpt)
Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (excerpt)
Civil Disobedience
I Have a Dream
Letter from a Birmingham City Jail
Nature POEMS America
A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim
A Visit from St. Nicholas
Because I Could Not Stop for Death
Christ of Alabama
Daddy
Dreams
Enslaved
Harlem (A Dream Deferred)
Harlem Dancer
Heart! We Will Forget Him
Heritage
How I Learned to Sweep
If You Were Coming In The Fall
I Hear America Singing
I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day
I Heard A Fly Buzz-When I Died I Like to See It Lap the Miles
I, Too, Sing of America
Incident
Lady Lazarus
Metaphors
Mirror
Mushrooms
My Country 'Tis of Thee
November Cotton Flower
One Art
One Today
Patrolling Barnegat
Red Wheelbarrow
September, 1918
Song of Myself
Song of the Smoke
Still I Rise Still Here
Storm Ending
Sympathy
The Bells
The Colossus
The Fish
The Great Figure
The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock
The Negro Speaks of Rivers
The Raven
The River Merchant's Wife
The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls
The Weary Blues
This is Just to Say
We Real Cool
We Wear The Mask
Woman Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech
Of Plymouth Plantation
On Nonviolent Resistance
Self Reliance
Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God
Speech to the Virginia Convention
The Crisis
The Declaration of Independence
Walden Johnny Appleseed
Little Women (excerpt)
Soldier's Home
The Earth Also
The Gift of the Magi
The Sky Tree
The Sun Still Rises in the Same Sky
The Tell Tale Heart
To Build a Fire
Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus SPEECHES, ESSAYS, and NON-FICTION A Narrative of the Captivity
A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas (excerpt)
Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin (excerpt)
Civil Disobedience
I Have a Dream Speech
Letter from a Birmingham City Jail
Nature Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech
Of Plymouth Plantation
On Nonviolent Resistance
Self Reliance
Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God
Speech to the Virginia Convention
The Crisis
The Declaration of Independence
Walden A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas


I Have a Dream


Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God


The Declaration of Independence


Walden SO HERE'S THE STORY Frederick Douglas is a mutant werewolf ...AND HERE'S THE TWIST Martin Luther King is an alien from Mars Jonathan Edwards is actually fighting the devil Thomas Jefferson is lobbying for zombies Henry David Thoreau is the last man on earth BE SURE TO INCLUDE: Textual support from the original source

Relevant theme(s) from your literary period

Some post-apocalyptic/cataclysmic element(s) jmeehan@bishopoconnell.org NON-FICTION POETRY SHORT FICTION SHORT STORIES and FICTION A Good Man is Hard to Find
A Kidnapped Santa Claus
A Mystery of Heroism
A Rose for Emily
A Worn Path
An Occurance at Owl Creek Bridge
Coyote Finishes His Work
Hills Like White Elephants
John Henry POEMS America
A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim
A Visit from St. Nicholas
Because I Could Not Stop for Death
Christ of Alabama
Daddy
Dreams
Enslaved
Harlem (A Dream Deferred)
Harlem Dancer
Heart! We Will Forget Him
Heritage
How I Learned to Sweep
If You Were Coming In The Fall
I Hear America Singing
I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day
I Heard A Fly Buzz-When I Died I Like to See It Lap the Miles
I, Too, Sing of America
Incident
Lady Lazarus
Metaphors
Mirror
Mushrooms
My Country 'Tis of Thee
November Cotton Flower
One Art
One Today
Patrolling Barnegat
Red Wheelbarrow
September, 1918
Song of Myself
Song of the Smoke
Still I Rise Still Here
Storm Ending
Sympathy
The Bells
The Colossus
The Fish
The Great Figure
The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock
The Negro Speaks of Rivers
The Raven
The River Merchant's Wife
The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls
The Weary Blues
This is Just to Say
We Real Cool
We Wear The Mask
Woman Johnny Appleseed
Little Women (excerpt)
Soldier's Home
The Earth Only
The Gift of the Magi
The Sky Tree
The Sun Still Rises in the Same Sky
The Tell Tale Heart
To Build a Fire
Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus NOVELS & DRAMA NOVELS Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Ethan Frome
October Sky
The Great Gatsby PLAYS The Crucible
Death of a Salesman 2-3 pages (TYPED)

UNDERLINE or BOLD your additions

50% for print version
50% for presentation Meld the original text with a post-apocalyptic twist Can work solo or as part of a group (5 people max) You may also use your Independent Research Paper Text DUE THURSDAY, JUNE 6 100 points every group member must contribute, both to the printed document and to the presentation Electronic copies of all other texts Electronic copy of the "I Have a Dream" Speech Edgar Allan Poe
Emily Dickinson
Walt Whitman
Langston Hughes
Sylvia Plath WARM-UP: Write a FOUND POEM

using nothing but elements obtained from a video clip. You are ONLY allowed to use words, phrases, characters, and objects that appear in this clip. (like William Carlos Williams) You may refer to any of the poems we covered in class. Additional poems can be found on Edmodo. Compose an original zombie poem in the style of: EDGAR ALLAN POE


EMILY DICKINSON


WALT WHITMAN Dark Romanticism
Gothic and supernatural elements
Regular use of rhyme
Regular line length
Often explores themes of madness Late Romanticism
UnConventional Capitalization and -- punctuation
Lines alternate 8 syllables, 6 syllables
(Every second line features an end rhyme)
Themes of isolation and immortality Late Romanticism
Themes of self-expression and wonder
Some poems feature rhyme, others do not
Typically irregular line length
Lots of first person ("I", "Me," etc.) Harlem Renaissance
Themes of empowerment, hope, and dreams
Poems are typically rhyming with short stanzas
Heavy use of metaphors (birds, colors, race)
Poems give voice to the minority experience Mid-20th century
"Confessional poetry" is intensely personal
Themes of mental illness, femininity, suicide
Extensive use of metaphors
Poems give voice to the female perspective WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS Modernist "found poetry"
Very short lines and stanzas
Borrows bits and pieces from everyday encounters
No rhyme or regular line length
Finds new ways to present familiar objects SYLVIA PLATH LANGSTON HUGHES THE FUTURE TIME TRAVEL How do you feel about ? If you had the ability to journey into the past or into the future, where would you go to? Why? What would you want to see?
What would you do / change? 1. Pick a group
2. Pick a book / scene
3. Pick an apocalyptic twist Easy as "1-2-3"
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