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Life in the 19th Century final copy

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Guy GUILLAUME

on 2 March 2016

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Transcript of Life in the 19th Century final copy

Technology in the 19th Century
Transportation
Transportation
Creation of the first team boat
1807 by Rober Fulton
Travelled 5 miles per hour
From NY to Alabama
Communication
"Telegraph"
Inventions of Telegraph
Samuel F. B. Morse in 1844
In sec messages transfered
Not every town had its own office
TELEGRAPH
http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ss5/b/ecotech19l.cfm
http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ss5/b/ecotech19l.cfm
Life in the 19th Century
1837-1901
Prosperity
Peace
Refined sensibilities
National self confident
Women in the 19th Century
Marriage in the 19th Century

Life Styles in the 19th Century-England
The
End
Thank you!


Child Labour in Victorian era
Child labour started due to the Industrial Revolution, the use of more steam power engines and poverty.
Children were cheaper, easier to control, and smaller than adults.
Children as Little Adults in the way they dressed and worked.
Most poor children worked in factories, textiles, cotton mills, farms,... as trappers and coal bearers (coal miners), chimney sweep, paper boy, scavengers and many other jobs to support their family .
Children worked at least 12 hours a day in very dangerous and unsanitary working conditions, and received very bad wages.
Poor children barely had any education.
Rich children' lives were the opposite.

(www.eiu.edu/eiutps/childlabor)
Breaker boys sort out coals from other stuff.
Report of Martha Appleton's accident, 1859
REPORT OF ACCIDENT - To Robert Baker, Esq., Inspector of Factories.
Name, Age, and Occupation of Person injured:
Martha Appleton At13 a Scavenger
Name of Firm, situation of the Factory in which the Accident occurred, and nature of the work carried on: Messrs. William Woods & Son
Coll sp & w
Wallgate
Wigan
Date of Accident: Monday Augst. 8th 1859
Nature of Accident:
Loss of all the fingers of the left hand
Statement made to me by the injured person as to the cause of Accident, the hour of the day when it happened, and how that person was employed at the time:
About 6.45 a.m. on Monday last I was at the back of the wheel house putting some bobbins in, when a giddiness came over me, and my hand slipped between the driving and the man douser wheels of the self acting Mules.






Martha Appleton's accident: letter from Inspector of Factories
Re Appleton
Copy of a letter addressed by Mr Baker to Messrs Woods & Son of Wigan. August 31 1859
Gentlemen,
I have received another application from the Father of the girl Appleton who met with an accident at your Factory, and enclose you my answer.
The man has been misled to write to you by an Attorney, and has
no apparent feeling against you and seemed willing to be moderate in his demands
when I saw him.
His present application is for £150, which is more reasonable than his last was.
Both he and his wife propose to put the girl to learn dressmaking, which will involve some years of maintenance: but this I suppose would not be very heavy, and I think this idea of theirs would be perhaps better than continuing at the Mill.
I tell you fairly that I am not sure whether I have the power to recommend an action. If I had, I had much rather recommend this poor child to your favourable consideration.
But since the wheels can be boxed off without detriment to the working of the machine, they ought to have been, I and if they had, even though the child was faint, the accident could not have happened
: and therefore you are morally bound to do something for her by way of compensation.
I shall be glad if when you have seen the Father, and you should be unable to come to terms with him, to use any effort between you for that purpose.
I am
Yours Truly
Robert Baker

(http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/pathways/citizenship/struggle_democracy/transcripts/letter_appleton.htm)
chimney sweeps

(http://www.victorianchildren.org/victorian-child-labor/)

coal bearers (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
coal trapper
(bbc.co.uk)
How Child Labour ended
Public attention and education necessity.
Great Depression theory.
Unions of labor.
Fair Labor Standard Act, 1938
At least 16 years old
Value Education
Not less than 25 cents an hour
No longer than forty-four hours during the first year
Children’s Bureau
Department of Labor and Wage and Hour Division
The Administrators as investigators
The plight climbing boys 1818.
"Did you experience any inconvenience to your Knees, or your Elbows? Yes, the skin was off my knees and elbows too, in climbing up the new Chimneys they forced me up.
Were you beat or compelled to go up by any violent means? - Yes, when I went to a narrow Chimney, if I could not do it, I dare not go home; when I used to come down, my Master would well beat me with the Brush; and not only my Master, but when we used to go with the Journeymen, if we could not do it, they used to hit us Three or Four Times with the Brush.
Is it usual to teach Boys to climb by Means of Blows or Threats, when they first begin? - Yes, nothing else, and enticing them up by Money; and if they will not go with being enticed up, they beat them, and force them to go up.
Do you know how the Boys are generally treated along with the Chimney Sweepers? - Yes, many of them let out for what they call going out a Queering, to those Men that go hawking about the Streets, calling "Sweep for the Soot."
For the most Part are they ill or well lodged? - Very bad indeed,; some have no more than One Blanket, some a Bit of Straw, and some a few Sacks to lie on.
Where do they generally lie? - In the Cellar, and up in the Loft.
When they sleep in the Cellar, is the soot put into the same Place? - Yes, always.
During the Winter-time, when the Boys go out on their Duty, have they Shoes and Stockings? - If I go out with a Journeyman in the Morning, if I have got bad Chilblains, and if I cannot get on fast enough, I must off with my Shoes, or they will knock me down with their Hand, and I must run through the Snow without Shoes, which I have done many times.
How often are they washed? - Sometimes every Week, sometimes every Fortnight, and sometimes not more than once a Year. A great many Masters if they have got a new Suit of Clothes for them, the Mistresses, to get a Drop of any Thing to drink, will go and pawn the Clothes; and then when Sunday comes, "My Man, you must have a Dose of Physic, you are not well;" and so they do not want their Clothes.
Do you know of the Boys being subject to any Accidents? - Yes, I have known one at Temple Bar: I came myself, and went up to him, but it was too late; the Boy was lost through a Woman forcing him up, it was his Mistress; he was not thoroughly learned, and he stuck himself in, and it was the Death of him; it was up Devereux Court, Temple Bar; he was dead."
(http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/pathways/citizenship/struggle_democracy/transcripts/sweep_cooper.htm)

The excerpt above is the actual record of a testimony in court between Dr. Lushington and a chimney boy- William Cooper about whether or not the bill against the "Employment of Climbing Boys" should be passed.
Child Labour in the 19th Century
Production Date
: 1907
Maker
Artist's Suffrage League; Artist's Suffrage League
Copyright:
© Museum of London
http://www.20thcenturylondon.org.uk/mol-50-82-808
Labor Demonstration, 1915
Owner
Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives/B'nai B'rith
http://jwa.org/media/labor-movement-1-still-image
Working Class Women
Monday May 26th 2008
Posted by: Anna Mcclurg
Fhttp://www.annamcclurg.com/2008/05/working-class-women.html
Victoria and Albert Museum
Corset, (front), 1883. Museum no T.84-1980
http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/c/corsets-and-bustles-1880-1890-from-over-structured-opulence-to-the-healthy-corset/
Working Class Women
Monday May 26th 2008
Posted by: Anna Mcclurg
http://www.annamcclurg.com/2008/05/working-class-women.html
The Aristocracy
-Work Cited Page
-Secondary Sources

Klein, Ethel. Gender Politics: From Consciousness to Mass Politics. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1984. Print.

Murdoch, Lydia. Daily Life of Victorian Women. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood, 2014. Print.

Rowbotham, Sheila. A Century of Women: The History of Women in Britain and the United States. London: Viking, 1997. Print.

Tobias, Sheila. Faces of Feminism: An Activist's Reflections on the Women's Movement. Boulder, CO: Westview, 1997. Print.

Vicinus, Martha. Suffer and Be Still: Women in the Victorian Age. Edited by Martha Vicinus. Bloomington: Ind., London, Indiana UP, 1973. Print.

The Mittle Class
-Primary Sources

Ciment, James D. "American Woman Modeling a Corset." How They Lived. An Annotated Tour of Daily Life through History in Primary Sources. 2 Vols. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2015. 786-87. Print.

Ciment, James D. "Women's Christian Temperance Union." How They Lived. An Annotated Tour of Daily Life through History in Primary Sources. 2 Vols. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2015. 690-91. Print.

"20th Century London." Women 1900-1950. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Feb. 2016.

"20th Century London." Women in the Workforce. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Feb. 2016.

https://koshersamurai.wordpress.com/tag/bustles/
http://historicaltidbits.blogspot.com/2013/05/1882-fashions-hat-bonnets.html
Lower Class
19th century women bonnets
Women's Bustles
" Corsets were designed to shape ...and to produce what was considered the ideal hourglass figure."
the complite story of custume and fashion, p.206
the complite story of custume and fashion, p.199
The Process
Sears catalog
the complite story of custume and fashion, p.198
the complite story of custume and fashion, p.206
Women's Fashion
the complite story of custume and fashion, p.206, 207
Men's Fashion
Marriage in 19th Century Britain
The popular culture street literature typically featured upwards of 500 advertisements by tradesmen and domestics searching for like-minded companions.
Marriage and the press
The British matrimonial press was created during the mid-nineteenth century when newspapers ceased the practice of accepting personal advertisements.
Marriage in the 19th century became scarce because the amount of single men was over weighed by the amount of single women.
These types of ads informed the lower middle class of marriage opportunities once the press when newspapers ceased the practice of accepting personal advertisements.

Men in Marriage
men with children had to remarry in order to evidence their masculinity and to obtain care for their children.
personality mattered and that the giving of gifts played a different role in the courtships of remarrying men than was the case in first marriages
experiences of remarrying men and their potential brides, that there was generally little discussion of the economics of the “match” in the case of remarrying men, and that the issue of prior children was surprisingly unimportant to the conduct of a courtship
Women in Marriage
"Spartacus Educational." Spartacus Educational. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Feb. 2016.

"Clown Fish." Getty Images. Points of View. EBSCO. Web. 20 Feb. 2016.
Cocks, Harry. "The Cost Of Marriage And The Matrimonial Agency In Late Victorian Britain." Social History 38.1 (2013): 66-88.Academic Search Premier. Web. 14 Feb. 2016.
King, Steven, and Mark Shephard. "Courtship And The Remarrying Man In Late-Victorian England." Journal Of Family History 37.3 (2012): 319-340. Professional Development Collection. Web. 14 Feb. 2016.

Women in marriage were very typical when it came to being wives
They cooked, cleaned, and took care of the kids
Women didn't know any better they thought that marrying and having kids were the only thing they were good at
They were raised to be housewives and nothing else
HURST, ISOBEL. "Ancient And Modern Women In The Woman's World." Victorian Studies 52.1 (2009): 42-51. Academic Search Premier. Web. 14 Feb. 2016.

Men also contributed to the perspective of the woman authors such as Oscar Wilde and Hyden Brown wrote books on how it was like to be a married woman in the 19th century
the complite story of custume and fashion, p.190
Avery,victorian people,p.106
The Royal Family
Franz Xavier
1846
The Best and The Power
Hush
Frank Holl
1877
Gauge
the complite story of custume and fashion, p.209,211
ttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKPhGHAdqk0-----------
h
A womans place
Stop drinking too much
http://b-womeninamericanhistory19.blogspot.com/2010/09/life-in-america-genre-paintings-by.html
Steam Engine
Locomotive
Telephone
Telegraph
Internal Combustion Engine
Rifle
Ironclad Ship
Electricity/Light Bulbs
Photography
Cotton Gin.
Inventions
James Watt is the creator
Purpose: Create an efficient source of power to operate with.
Examples: ships, Factories, Cars.
Steam Engine
Locomotive Engine
Richard Trevithick
20m/hr
Steam Engine
The rapid development of industry that occurred in the late 18th and 19th centuries,
new invention of machines.
Purpose to make work easier for farmers for instance.

Industrial Revolution
Steam Engine
Locomotive
Telephone
Telegraph
Internal Combustion Engine
Rifle
Ironclad Ship
Electricity/Light Bulbs
Photography
Cotton Gin.
Inventions
James Watt is the creator
Purpose: Create an efficient source of power to operate with.
Examples: ships, Factories, Cars.
Steam Engine
Locomotive Engine
Richard Trevithick
20m/hr
Steam Engine
The rapid development of industry that occurred in the late 18th and 19th centuries,
new invention of machines.
Purpose to make work easier for farmers for instance.

Industrial Revolution
Full transcript