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Affinity Seeking Theory

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by

Fiona Hope

on 9 May 2013

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Transcript of Affinity Seeking Theory

The active social communication process by which individuals attempt to get others to like and feel positive towards them. Affinity Seeking Theory: Affinity-Seeking Strategies and Open Communication in Peer Workplace Relationships Affinity-Seeking Theory Communication in Collegiate Female-Male Relationships Background Information Authors: Jason Gordon and Rosanna L. Hartman (2009)
Research Questions:
Special peers are more likely to use affinity-seeking strategies in the workplace than collegial peers.
Special peers are more likely to use affinity-seeking strategies in the workplace than information peers.
Special peers are more likely to use open communication in the workplace than do collegial peers.
Special peers are more likely to use open communication in the workplace than do informational peers.
Methods and Measures: 1 of 3 surveys emailed out (informational, special, and collegial surveys), The Communication Openness Scale and the Affinity-seeking Instrument (Created by Bell, 1987) Affinity Strategies in Relationships: The Role of Gender and Imagined Interactions in Maintaining Liking Among College Roommates Authors: James M. Honeycutt and James Patterson
Research Question: What affinity strategies do college roommates use to enhance affinity in the relationship?
Difference in Gender: Woman place affinity as a high priority; Men more driven by power and status
Participants: 84 roommate pairs, average age 20
Findings:
Imagined Interactions and gender affects affinity strategies
Other-involvement predicted the affinity for the other roommate
Female roommate pairs endorsed strategies reflecting other-involvement.
Females had more imagined interactions than males; most of them relatively pleasant.

Various combinations of other-involvement strategies are important in facilitating affinity for the roommate (rather than isolated strategies). Authors: Robert A. Bell and John A. Daly
Founded: 1984
Key Concepts: 25-30 strategies that a person utilizes to make them more likeable (the actual number depends on what article you read).
Recent Research: How relationships form and are maintained.
Importance: It provides insight into real world situations in which it would be beneficial to make a good impression and form positive relationships. Applying the Theory Weaknesses and Limitations Authors: Virgina P. Richmond, Joan S. Gorham, and Brain J. Furio
Research Questions:
To what extent do college females and males differ in their choices of affinity-seeking strategies in cross-gender dyads?
To what extent do college females and males differ in affinity-seeking strategies perceived as appropriate for the other individual in cross-gender dyads?
Methods and Measures: 472 students participants were provided with a description of a quiet or outgoing student of the opposite gender, Likert Scale Other Theories that might apply... Social Penetration Theory

Communication Accommodation Theory The individuals preferences may have little relationship with their actual actions
The theory looks at one-on-one interactions; not really groups
The measurement of the participant's self-awareness Works Cited Honeycutt, J. M., & Patterson, J. (1997). Affinity strategies in relationships: The role of gender and imagined interactions in maintaining liking among college roommates. Personal Relationships, (4), 35-46.
Richmond, V. P., Gorham, J. S., &Furio, B. J. (1987). Affinity-Seeking Communication in Collegiate Female-Male Relationships. Communication Quarterly, (Vol. 35), 334-348.
Gordon, Jason & Hartman Rosanna L. (2009). Affinity-Seeking Strategies and Open Communication in Peer Workplace Relationships. Atlantic Journal of Communication, (Vol. 17), 115-125.
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