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Immunization Literature Review Techniques

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on 22 April 2015

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Transcript of Immunization Literature Review Techniques

U.S. vaccination compliance has decreased in recent years


Childhood vaccination is a reliable public health intervention used to prevent communicable disease outbreaks. In the United States, vaccination compliance has decreased. Vaccinations not only protect the individuals who receive them, but the community through "herd immunity.” However, "herd immunity" can only protect the unvaccinated if a majority actually receive the vaccine. The decrease of vaccination rates in the United States has made the general population vulnerable to viruses once considered eradicated, such as the measles.
Background
Findings
Purpose
The purpose of our literature review is to investigate the effectiveness
of prenatal vaccination educational program to improve vaccination
status of infants.
Methods of Search
Key words:
vaccination; immunization
health literacy; education; intervention
pregnancy; prenatal; perinatal
Joyce Alexander, Lauren Azuela, Justine Gonzalez, & Katie Keyes
Literature Review Search Techniques
Method of Organization
Articles are seperated into 3 categories:
Summary
References
Adorador, A., McNulty, R., Hart, D., & Fitzpatrick, J. J. (2011). Perceived barriers to immunizations as identified by Latino mothers. Journal of The American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 23(9), 501-508. doi:10.1111/j.1745-7599.2011.00632

Ahlers-Schmidt (2012) Feasability of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate Text Reminders for Immunization Compliance in Kids (TRICKs)

Austvoll-Dahlgren, A., & Helseth, S. (2010). What informs parents' decision-making about childhood vaccinations?. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(11), 2421-2430. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05403

Dardis, M. R., Koharick, L. S., & Dukes, S. (2015). Using the health belief model to develop strategies to improve pertussis vaccination rates among preschool staff. DOI: 10.1177/1942602X14549256

Krieger (2000) Increasing influenza and pneumococcal immunization rates: a randomized controlled study of a senior center-based intervention

Navar (2007) Prenatal immunization education: The pediatric prenatal visit and routine OB Care

Pati (2010) Maternal health literacy and late initiation of immunization status among an inner city birth cohort

Plumridge, E., Goodyear-Smith, F., & Ross, J. (2009). Nurse and parent partnership during children's vaccinations: a conversation analysis. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 65(6), 1187-1194. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2009.04999

Saitoh (2013) Perinatal immunization education improves immunization rates and knowledge: A randomized controlled trial

Williams (2013) Randomized trial to increase acceptance of immunization by vaccine hesitant parents

Wilson (2012) Using the teach back method to increase maternal immunization literacy among low income pregnant women in Jamaica: Pilot study

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/imz-managers/coverage/nis/child/2013-released-child-teen.html

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/imz-managers/coverage/nis/child/figures/2013-map.html
Elimination & Selection
Published before 2005 unless completely relevant
Irrelevant to topic
Background
Perceived Barriers to Immunization as Identified by Latino Mothers
Barriers to Immunization
Feasability of a randomized controlled trial to evaluate Text Reminders for Immunization Compliance in Kids (TRICKs)
Perinatal immunization education improves immunization rates and knowledge: A randomized controlled trial
Using the Health Belief Model to Develop Educational Strategies to Improve Pertussis Vaccination Rates
Assessing Immunization Interventions in the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Prgoram
Randomized trial to increase acceptance of immunization by vaccine hesitant parents
Increasing influenza and pneumococcal immunization rates: a randomized controlled study of a senior center-based intervention
Prenatal immunization education: The pediatric prenatal visit and routine OB Care
Maternal health literacy and late initiation of immunization status among an inner city birth cohort
Objective:
Study aimed determine if maternal health literacy influences early infant immunizations.

Design:
Logitudinal prospective moter-infant dyads

Sample Size:
N=506

Main Finding:
Strong predictors of up-to-date immunization status at 3 months were maternal education (HS or beyond) and attending a hospital-affiliated clinic

Using the teach back method to increase maternal immunization literacy among low income pregnant women in jJamaica: Pilot study
Nurse and Parent Partnership During Children's Vaccination
Objective
: To examine partnership and communication between nurses and parents during actual vaccination events.

Design
: Stand-alone study

Sample size:
Ten interactions during actual vaccination events in six general practices (eight nurses and number of parents was not indicated)

Main finding:
Concurrent and coordinated talk were employed between nurse and parent. These findings suggest that such communication approaches play a role in facilitating the actual vaccination event and rapport building with both the parent
and child.

What Informs Parents' Decision-making About Childhood Vaccination?
Objective:
To explore the factors, particularly barriers and facilitators to searching for information, which influence the decision-making process among parents about childhood vaccinations.

Design:
Grounded theory approach

Sample size:
Ten parents and 16 public health nurses

Main finding:
Parents positive attitudes, being decided, and level of knowledge were found to be barriers. Public health nurses were the most important source of information about vaccinations.

Nurse Role
(Austvoll-Dahlgren & Helseth, 2010)
Intervention-based Articles
Objective:
To identify perceived barriers to vaccinations among low-income Latino mothers

Design:
Modified survey (Flores et al., 1999)

Sample size:
One hundred Latino mothers

Main Finding
: Most mothers thought that their children were up to date on their vaccinations, however they were not. Reported barriers included: lack of insurance, lack of transportation, affordability, language, and knowledge deficit.
(Aldorador, McNulty, Hart, & Fitzpatrick, 2011)
(Plumridge, Goodyear-Smith, & Ross, 2009)
Objective:
Assess maternal health literacy pregnant Jamaican women ability to communicate benefits, risks, and safety of vaccines

Design:
Reading fluency of participants teach back method with REALM tool

Sample Size:
Convenience sampling N=34 from womens health clinic

Main Finding:
After vaccine education, women unable to give correct answers using teach back method had lower health literacy about vaccinations and lower immunization status of infants.
Objective:
To determine proportion of OB practices and
hospital-based prenatal education classes to be provided for infant immunization information.

Design:
Phone survey, pretest posttest


Study constructs:
Willingness to provide immunization information

Main Finding:
23% OB practices reported providing pregnant women provided
information on routine immunnizations for child.
65% practices provided no information but willing to change
immunization
education.
20% did not provide information.

Objective
: Pilot study using TRICKs to evaluate its feasability and potential to increase immunization coverage among children

Design
: pilot study

Sample Size
: 90 parents of newborns who were discharged from local hospitals

Main Finding
: greater numbers of children
received vaccinations using TRICKs
Objective
: to determine if providing perinatal immunization education positively changes innumization status of infants, influences the attitudes and beliefs of mothers and affects the intent to vaccinate children in Japan

Design
: quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest

Sample Size:
n=106

Main Finding:
Intervention group had 8.3% higher imm. rate than control group at 3 mo. no diff btwn prenatal (29.4%) and postnatal (38.9%) of imm status of baby. 61.4% Intervention group had intentions to vaccinate after intervention compared to 33.3% control group. perinatal imm. education improved imm status of infants, increase women’s knowledge on imm & intention to vaccinate infants
Objective
:
To investigate the effectiveness of an educational program to instruct adults about Tdap boosters in order to attempt to decrease the incidence os pertussis.

Design
:
Pilot study, quasi-experimental

Sample Size:

N=25 female adult teachers

Main Finding:
80% stated being vaccinated for Tdap,
12% did not know,
8% did not receive Tdap.
After intervention 64% became vaccinated.
Objective:
To evaluate if brochures on vaccinations increase compliance rates amoung senior citizien
Design:
Seniors recruited from senior center selected to randomely as intervention or conrtol group.
Sample Size:
N=1246, Control group= 553, Intervention group= 530
Main Finding:
Immunization rate in intervention group increased
from 78.3% in year prior to intervention to 88.2%
Objective:
To evaluate an educational intervention to improve parental attitudes and vaccine uptake in vaccine-hesitant parents
Design:
Comparison design with pre-test and post test
(Quasi-experimental)
Sample Size:
N=132 Control group= 67, Intervention group=55
Main Finding:
Intervention group showed a significant decrease in
PACV score at two month visit when
compared to controlled group,
mean difference of 6.7
Objective:
To determine coverage levels of WIC and non-WIC participants and assess the effectiveness of immunization intervention strategies
Design:
Data collected from National Immunization Survery (2007-2011). Population was limited to children ages 24-36 months. (longitutial study)
Sample Size:
WIC ineligible-6,797
WIC previous participated-2.295, current 3,404
Main Finding:
Low-income children participating in WIC
where shown to have immunivation rates
comparable to more affluent children.
Ahlers-Schmidt (2012)
Saitoh, 2013
(Pati, Feemaster, Mohamad, Fiks, Grundmeier, Cnaan, 2010)
(Wilson, Mayeta-Peart, Parada-Webster, & Nordstrom, 2012)
Dardis, M., Koharchik, L. S., an Dukes, S. (2015)
(Navar, Halsey, Carter, Montgomery, & Salmon, 2007)
1. Barriers to Vaccinations
2. Nursing Role in Vaccination Education
3. Vaccination Education Interventions
(Williams et. al, 2013))
Application to nursing
Provided information about immunizations in general
Barriers:
Cultural differences (language barriers and practices)
Patient/parent understanding (Health-literacy)
Communication between provider and patient
Lack of insurance
Lack of transportation
Affordability
Knowledge deficit (Myths vs fact)

Public health nurses are the most important source of vaccine information for people

Providing information and education about vaccinations helps to improve the vaccination status of people in general.

What we know
(Krieger et al., 2000)
Gaps in the research
Many articles about adult and older child vaccinations

Not many articles geared toward infant immunization status

Very few on prenatal and perinatal vaccination educational interventions

Most all articles only examined low-socioeconomical groups


(Thomas et al., 2014)
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