Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Thematic Unit - Outsider Art

No description
by

Phil Enderby

on 2 January 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Thematic Unit - Outsider Art

Theme: Outsider Art/Art Singulier
Grades 11-12 Rationale, Purpose, and Goals of the Unit Formal Lesson Plan: Wesley Willis The rationale, purpose, and/or goal of this unit is to introduce students to various forms of Outsider Art, Raw Art, Art Brut, or as it is now called Art Singulier. These various artists are intertwined with Modern Art methods in that they involve aspects of society/history and contemporary art. This subject “Outsider Art” may break the barriers for students who feel like ‘outsiders’ themselves or even those that feel that art isn’t important or relevant to their lives or practical in today’s world. It would help guide these students towards finding their individual qualities. Some discussion questions you could use to appeal to their interests would include things like who are outsiders in our society, how it might feel to be in their shoes, and how they became these outsiders. Gestures these artists make towards feeling and thoughts that they are trying to provoke/convey within their pieces; what do they remind us of? They remind us that we are all human and that art can be for everyone!
This unit will broaden student’s views of what art is and can be. The last goal of this unit is guide our students through personal development as both artists and positive members of society. Standards and Benchmarks Vocabulary and Basic Concepts of Art
A.12.1 Possess a mental storehouse of images
A.12.2 Know advanced vocabulary related to their study of art
A.12.5 Explain that art is one of the greatest achievements of human beings
D.12.4 Use basic concepts in art, such as “form follows function,” “destruction of the box,” “less is more,” balance, symmetry, integrity, authenticity, and originality
D.12.5 Know common language in art, such as abstraction, representation, impressionism, reproduction, serigraphy, sculpture, graphic design, construction, and aesthetics
J.12.6 Know the value of art as a basic part of being human
K. 12.4 Continue to use a variety of tools, such as more sophisticated application of words, numbers, sounds, movements, images, objects, emotions, technology, and spaces to help understand and communicate about the visual word

s in art are shaped by their own culture and society
B.12.7 Understand and apply environmental and aesthetic issues to concepts related to
the design of packaging, industrial products, and cities
D.12.1 Know about the history, public art, and unique architecture of their cultural community
D.12.2 Know about artists and designers, such as architects, furniture designers, critics, preservationists, museum curators, and gallery owners in their community
F.12.2 Understand visual techniques used in mass media
F.12.4 Recognize stereotyping in visual media
F.12.5 Understand the effects of production techniques on viewers' perceptions
I.12.5 Understand and recognize that art reflects the history and culture in which it was created
K.12.1 Connect their knowledge and skills in art to other areas, such as the humanities, sciences, social studies, and technology
K.12.3 Apply what they know about the nature of life, nature, the physical world, and the human condition to their understanding and creation of art
K. 12.6 Know the similarities and differences of world cultures by studying their fine arts: music, dance, theatre, literature, and architecture
L. 12.6 Understand that art is created by people with different world views, expresses diverse ideas, and changes over time

The Creative Process and Personal Development
A.12.6 Use art as a basic way of thinking and communicating about the world
C.12.1 Use the elements and principles of design in sophisticated ways
C.12.2 Understand the procedures of developing quality design
C.12.3 Use design to create artworks that have different meanings
C.12.4 Use advanced design techniques to improve and/or change artwork
C.12.6 Experiment visually with sketches for complex solutions involving concepts and
symbols
C.12.7 Apply advanced craft and skills to consistently produce quality art
D.12.6 Apply problem-solving strategies that promote fluency, flexibility, elaboration, and
originality
E.12.1 Communicate ideas by producing sophisticated studio art forms, such as drawings,
paintings, prints, sculpture, jewelry, fibers, and ceramics
E.12.2 Communicate ideas by producing advanced design art forms, such as graphic
design, product design, architecture, landscape, and media arts, such as film,
photography, and multimedia
E.12.3 Communicate ideas by producing popular images and objects, such as folk art,
traditional arts and crafts, popular arts, mass media, and consumer products
E.12.4 Communicate ideas by producing advanced visual communication forms useful in
everyday life, such as sketches, diagrams, graphs, plans, and models
E.12.5 Continue to use the visual arts to express ideas that can't be expressed by words
alone
F.12.6 Use a range of media techniques to create art
F.12.7 Apply a working knowledge of media production systems
F.12.8 Revise media productions based on personal reflection and audience response
G.12.4 Create works of art that have complex meanings
H.12.1. Interpret complex patterns and forms by drawing them
H.12.3 Use careful observation to draw, paint, and sculpt from life
H.12.4 Create two-dimensional plans to make three-dimensional models
H.12.6 Be critical viewers and producers of mass-media images
I.12.1 Use art to understand their own and others' emotions
I.12.2 Make art that explores a variety of emotions
I.12.3 Compare and contrast feelings in a work of art
I.12.4 Look at art and compare their feelings with those of the artist and others
I.12.6 Create art that expresses deep feelings
I.12.7 Work independently, collaboratively, and with deep concentration when creating
works of art
J.12.2 Choose materials and techniques to influence the expressive quality of art
J.12.5 Understand their own ideas about the purposes and meanings of art
K.12.1 Connect their knowledge and skills in art to other areas, such as the humanities,
sciences, social studies, and technology
K.12.2 Invent new artistic forms to communicate ideas and solutions to problems
K.12.3 Apply what they know about the nature of life, nature, the physical world, and the
human condition to their understanding and creation of art
K.12.4 Continue to use a variety of tools, such as more sophisticated application of words,
numbers, sounds, movements, images, objects, emotions, technology, and spaces,
to help understand and communicate about the visual world
L.12.1 Use their knowledge, intuition, and experiences to develop ideas for artwork
L. 12.2 Continue to develop a base knowledge and skills from which to create new ideas
L. 12.3 Use personal traits, such as independent thinking, courage, integrity, insight, and dedication, in creating quality art and design
L. 12.4 Use their knowledge of nature and works of art as sources for new ideas
L. 12.5 Develop a personal style in art and design that reflects who they are
L. 12.7 Imagine complex situations from a variety of challenging points of view Knowing and Recognizing Styles, Art and Design History
A.12.3 Know and recognize styles of art from their own and other parts of the world
A.12.4 Know and recognize many styles of art from various times
B.12.1 Demonstrate how artists and cultures throughout history have used art tocommunicate ideas and to develop functions, structures, and designs
B.12.2 Show ways that form, function, meaning, and expressive qualities of art anddesign change from culture to culture and artist to artist
B.12.3 Relate works of art and designed objects to specific cultures, times, and places
B.12.4 Know how artists, designers, and cultures influence art
B.12.6 Describe, analyze, interpret, and judge art images and objects from various cultures, artists, and designers
C.12.2 Understand the procedures of developing quality design
F.12.2 Understand visual techniques used in mass media
F.12.4 Recognize stereotyping in visual media
F.12.5 Understand the effects of production techniques on viewers' perceptions
G.12.1 Use visual images as tools for thinking and communicating
G.12.2 Know how to find the meanings in artwork
H.12.2 Know how human eyes work to see subtle changes in light, color, textures, and surfaces
I.12.5 Understand and recognize that art reflects the history and culture in which it wascreated
J.12.1 Understand the purposes and functions of art
J.12.8 Know concepts of beauty in different cultures
J.12.9 Identify the differences between original artworks, reproductions, and copies
K.12.5 Know about a range of art activities, such as museum curation, historic preservation, collecting, and writing about art and design

Analysis and Description, Interpretation
B.12.6 Describe, analyze, interpret, and judge art images and objects from various cultures, artists, and designers
C.12.5 Analyze the complexities of nature and use challenging artistic images and ideas as visual resources
D.12.3 Explain how the environment influences the look and use of art, architecture, and
design
F.12.1 Make informed judgments about mass media, such as magazines, television,
computers, and films
F.12.2 Understand visual techniques used in mass media
F.12.3 Interpret visual messages in advertisements, news, and entertainment programs
F.12.4 Recognize stereotyping in visual media
F.12.5 Understand the effects of production techniques on viewers' perceptions
G.12.2 Know how to find the meanings in artwork
G.12.3 Interpret more complex meanings in challenging works of art, including media arts
H.12.2 Know how human eyes work to see subtle changes in light, color, textures, and
surfaces
H.12.5 Make and interpret maps, charts, and plans
H.12.6 Be critical viewers and producers of mass-media images
I. 12.1 Use art to understand their own and others’ emotions
I. 12.3 Compare and contrast feelings in a work of art
I. 12.4 Look at art and compare their feelings in a work of art
J.12.1 Understand the purposes and functions of art
J.12.3 Identify ways different cultures think about art
J.12.4 Identify ways philosophers think about art
J.12.5 Understand their own ideas about the purposes and meanings of art
J.12.7 Understand and apply art criticism and aesthetic knowledge in art and design
J.12.10 Reflect and talk about works of art Standards and Benchmarks Continued... Standards and Benchmarks continued... Standards and Benchmarks Continued... Connections to Culture
B.12.2 Show ways that form, function, meaning, and expressive qualities of art and design change from culture to culture and artist to artist
B.12.3 Relate works of art and designed objects to specific cultures, times, and places
B.12.4 Know how artists, designers, and cultures influence art
B.12.5 Understand how their choices in art are shaped by their own culture and society
B.12.7 Understand and apply environmental and aesthetic issues to concepts related to the design of packaging, industrial products, and cities
D.12.1 Know about the history, public art, and unique architecture of their cultural community
D.12.2 Know about artists and designers, such as architects, furniture designers, critics, preservationists, museum curators, and gallery owners in their community
F.12.2 Understand visual techniques used in mass media
F.12.4 Recognize stereotyping in visual media
F.12.5 Understand the effects of production techniques on viewers' perceptions
I.12.5 Understand and recognize that art reflects the history and culture in which it was created
K.12.1 Connect their knowledge and skills in art to other areas, such as the humanities, sciences, social studies, and technology
K.12.3 Apply what they know about the nature of life, nature, the physical world, and the human condition to their understanding and creation of art
K.12.6 Know the similarities and differences of world cultures by studying their fine arts: music, dance, theatre, literature, and architecture
L.12.6 Understand that art is created by people with different world views, expresses diverse ideas, and changes over times in art are shaped by their own culture and society
B.12.7 Understand and apply environmental and aesthetic issues to concepts related tothe design of packaging, industrial products, and cities
D.12.1 Know about the history, public art, and unique architecture of their cultural community
D.12.2 Know about artists and designers, such as architects, furniture designers, critics, preservationists, museum curators, and gallery owners in their community
F.12.2 Understand visual techniques used in mass media
F.12.4 Recognize stereotyping in visual media
F.12.5 Understand the effects of production techniques on viewers' perceptions
I.12.5 Understand and recognize that art reflects the history and culture in which it was created
K.12.1 Connect their knowledge and skills in art to other areas, such as the humanities, sciences, social studies, and technology
K.12.3 Apply what they know about the nature of life, nature, the physical world, and the human condition to their understanding and creation of art
K.12.6 Know the similarities and differences of world cultures by studying their fine arts: music, dance, theatre, literature, and architecture In this lesson, students will learn about the life, music, and artwork of Wesley Willis. They will gain an understanding of the hardships of his life and how he continued to make art and music in order to stay optimistic and out of trouble. Students will gain a deeper level of respect for people with mental and psychological disorders. Students will also learn about Willis's drawing style and will each create their own perspective drawing with two different points of view. In addition, students will continue to develop an understanding for some of the main objectives of the unit: that art can be used as therapy, that anyone is capable of being an artist, and that art is for everyone. Lesson Objectives: Materials and Resources DVD player or computer with built-in DVD player
TV or Projector
"Wesley Willis's Joy Rides" DVD (or http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YBgZErdvyU)
Discussion questions (can be projected on the screen or written on either looseleaf paper or on the chalkboard/dry erase board)
Individual class journals (to continue 9-week project)
Large drawing paper (approx. 22" X 30") (one per student)
Drawing/Masonite boards (one per student)
Any combination of pencils, pens, markers, colored pencils, crayons, and/or gouache with paint brushes Assessment Students will be assessed on their understanding of the film through oral discussion questions asked in class after the film, first in small groups and then as a class, as well as by whether or not they took notes during the film and personal reflections after the film in their journals. They will also be assessed on their understanding of Wesley Willis’s “double point-of-view” style of drawing by creating a perspective drawing of their own with two separate points-of-view. Procedure and
Methods Pre-Assesment (~10m): In journals, answer the following questions: "What is the first thing that comes to your mind when you hear the words 'mental disorder' or 'psychological disorder?'"
"How do society and the media portray people with mental or psychological disorders?"
"Do people with mental or psychological disorders contribute to society? If so, in what ways?" Watch a portion of "Wesley Willis's Joy Rides." Take notes in journals during film (~30m) Discussions in groups of about four students on general thoughts about the film, things they liked or didn't like, etc. (~5m) Oral Assessment: Class discussion (~15-20m) on topics such as: students' preconceptions before watching the film, changed opinions after the film, how Wesley used art and music to improve the quality of his life, Wesley's impact on those around him (friends and strangers) Written Assessment/Homework: Continue writing reflections on the class and film in journals Send students to hallway intersections or windows to work on their double point-of-view perspective drawings (~25-30m) Accommodations and Differentiations Linguistic: Answering pre-assessment questions, writing reflections, participating in group/class discussions Spanish subtitles will be turned on during the film for Spanish-speaking ESL students. Watching the video: visual and auditory learners

Class discussions: auditory learners

Writing notes and responses: visual, kinesthetic, and auditory learners

Drawing: visual and kinesthetic learners. Accommodations and Differentiations (cont.) Logical/Mathematical: Recalling specific facts from the film during class discussions, note-taking Bodily/Kinesthetic- Drawing (hand-eye coordination) Intrapersonal- Answering pre-assessment questions and writing personal reflections Spatial: Determining distance/placement while drawing Naturalistic: Drawing perspective scenes from nature Musical- May particularly enjoy or relate to the sections of the film about Wesley's music Interpersonal- Participating in group/class discussions Standards
and Benchmarks A.12.1
A.12.3
A.12.5
A.12.6
B.12.1
B.12.2
B.12.3
B.12.4
B.12.6
C.12.6
D.12.5 D.12.6
E.12.5
F.12.4
F.12.5
G.12.1
G.12.2
H.12.1
H.12.2
H.12.3
I.12.1
I.12.3 I.12.4
I.12.5
J.12.1
J.12.2
J.12.5
J.12.6
J.12.10
K.12.1
K.12.3
K.12.4
L.12.6 Week 1 - Introductions and History of Outsider Art Hand out and explain syllabus, rules, expectations
Explain general ideas/goals of class
Talk about possible fundraising idea for field trip to the John Michael Kohler Art Center in Sheboygan, WI Packer game hand-outs, bake sale, car wash, etc. Day 1 Watch/Listen to "A Song About Art" Day 2 Pre-assessment: Ask students if they know of any outsider artists and see if they can guess how/why people began to study and collect Outsider Art
Give presentation on history of outsider art/Art Brut and vocabulary Introduce journal assignment (nine weeks long, part of final) Students will follow along with guided vocabulary worksheet and assessed through a class discussion/participation Introduce current events article summary assignment (One due by the end of each week starting next week) Day 3 "Interview game" with paper slips and student matching, write notes in journals Information on Hans Prinzhorn, Jean Dubuffet, Max Fourny, and Bruno Decharme http://prezi.com/-5gykg7rfv-s/outsider-art-101-grades-6-12/ Introduce quarter-long research project and list of available artists. Students will to computer lab and select three or four artists that are most interesting to them.
Surprise Assessment: Each student must say two things about the artists they researched before he or she can leave. Day 4 Groups of students determined for research project, announced at beginning of class, groups each choose two different artists
Research as a group in computer lab Day 5 First half of class spent researching artists in the library
Assessment: Second half spent playing Jeopardy/trivia game in teams, reviewing notes and images from earlier in the week Materials Needed: Types of Assessments Used: Team trivia, class discussions, vocabulary worksheet, oral responses, interpersonal communication/piecing clues together Day 2 Give presentation on Loy Bowlin - "The Original Rhinestone Cowboy" while students take notes
Continue working on boot project while listening to music, preferably "Rhinestone Cowboy" by Glen Campbell Day 3 Give presentation on Emery Blagden and "The Healing Machine" while students take notes in their journals
Continue working on boots, listen to music Day 4 Day 5 Week 2 - Materials, Pattern, and Design Day 1 Give presentation on the history of the cowboy boot
Introduce "Boot" Project
Give demo on technique used for Boot project Boot project due. Each student writes a brief description of the significance of the design on their boot, what it represents or means to him or her
Team Trivia (different teams from the week before) Current event articles due. Five students chosen at random to share their articles and how they feel about them. Other students gain participation points for responding.
Pop quiz (10 short questions on Emery Blagdon, Loy Bowlin, and their artwork)
Continue working on Boot project Materials needed: 20 old cowboy boots, sequins, glitter, craft glue, acrylic paint, construction paper, beads, pens, pencils, buttons, computer, projector. Language Arts Skills: Speaking, Listening, Writing, Research, Visual Viewing Language Arts Skill: Research, Visual Viewing Language Arts Skills: Research, Listening, Speaking, Visual Viewing Language Arts Skills: Listening, Writing, Technology, Visual Viewing Computer and printer, projector, computer paper and printer ink, 20 8.5" X 5.5" Moleskine-style sketchbooks/journals, pens and pencils Language Arts Skills: Visual Viewing and Technology Standards and Benchmarks continued...
Full transcript