Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Research Journey

6 stages of the research process.
by

Harriet Mendlowitz

on 12 August 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Research Journey

The Research Journey
Broad Topic: The Environment (too broad)
2. RESOURCE SELECTION & EVALUATION
How Do I Choose A Topic?
Makes the case for your position. Backed up by research
Usually assigned in college
Keywords: persuade, argue, evaluate, convince
Example: "This paper will argue that the rise of women in 20th century, U.S politics would not have been possible without the elimination of laws that prevented married women from maintaining control of property they owned prior to marriage. "
What Type of Research Project Is It?
Straightforward account of info and facts about topic
Assigned most often in high school
Keywords: describe, summarize, survey
Example: "This research paper will describe the laws regarding women and property rights in the U.S. prior to the 19th amendment.
Exploration of various aspects of your topic, and your conclusions
Often assigned in high school
Keywords: explain, compare & contrast
Example: "This paper will examine the role of property rights in America, and their effect on womens' participation in politics before and after the adoption of the 19th amendment. "
1. SELECTING YOUR TOPIC
Biodiversity
Renewable Energy
Always keep your original research question in mind. It will help you focus your research on those resources that provide you with evidence to back up your claim. E.g.- "Would charging people for plastic shopping bags substantially reduce the amount of non-biodegradable waste in our landfills ?"

If information and research prove too difficult to find, ADJUST COURSE- the earlier, the better.
Remember: You can always revise your thesis.

Finally, you may find evidence that disproves your thesis. THAT'S OK. If you had all the answers, there wouldn't be a need for research. Don't cherry-pick the evidence that supports your thesis. Always make a good faith effort to present other points of view (POV) that challenge your assumptions/thesis. Let the weight of the facts inform your conclusion, even if they run counter to your original claim. It is the integrity of your process that counts.
To take full advantage of the LRC Catalog you need to login to your account (see Ms. M if you don not know your user name and password).
Don't forget the NY Public Library. You can search their print collection using their online catalog. You can request that any resource not at your local branch be sent there for you to pick-up. Here are two books that came up when I plugged in the keyword "recycling."
The concept of recycling has been well-documented in the press. The Periodical Index from NYPL's "Articles & Databases" would help you locate magazine and journal articles. You would be able to narrow your search to those articles that speak directly to the use of plastic bags.
Classnotes & Textbooks
Subject Encyclopedias
The Internet
Newspapers
Magazines
Your choice of appropriate resources will depend on your understanding of what's called the "information cycle," which tells you changing nature of media coverage after an event has transpired, and as time passes.
From "The Information Cycle," University of IL at Urbana-Champaign. Go to the website for more in-depth info: http://www.library.illinois.edu/ugl/howdoi/informationcycle.html
Print Resources
The LRC catalog of print and e-resources should be your first stop for locating resources. If you plug "environment" into the DQ searchbar, you'll get 55 results
Scouting For A Topic?
Pick A Topic
That Floats Your
Online directories are searchable collections of online resource links, usually organized by subject or topic. They are great places to both narrow down a topic, and to locate resources once you have a topic. Examples include:
Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)- great resource for finding OA journals that provide free access to their scholarly articles.
ipl2- directory of librarian-vetted online resources categorized by subject.
ElRoBookmarks collection in Diigo- a directory Ms. M has created for our students and faculty. It contains over 2000 vetted resources. You will find some examples of content from this ever-growing collection below. It can be searched by keyword/phrase. It is also organized by topic/subject-specific lists for your convenience. Your teachers will be pointing you to some of these lists when you are covering various units of study.
Online Portals usually provide a gateway to both information and resources that speak to a single purpose, theme, or subject area.
Book Index or Table of Contents
Environment
STEM
Philosophy & Religion
History
Miscellaneous
English & The Arts
Here Are Some Good Ways To Turn On Your
Sustainability
SO, WHAT'S A THESIS, AND WHY DO I NEED ONE?
Online Databases
Online databases are web-based storage-houses of searchable content provided by publishers, academic institutions and others. This is where you can find scholarly articles, newspapers, conference proceedings, reports, etc. that have been vetted by experts for authority. The video to your right provides a very good explanation. Unfortunately, access to most of the better ones require a paid subscription. But, NYS residents are lucky enough to have free access to the NOVELNY collection (see below).
All NYS residents have free access through their NY Public Library card account and/or through their school to the
NOVEL (NY Online Virtual Electronic Library)
collection of databases. Links to all three content providers (
Gale, Proquest and Grolier Online
) are on the LRC website (under "Academics" on ElRo's website). You may login at school without a username or password. At home you'll need this info, which is posted throughout the LRC, and on the LRC website. NOVEL's collection contains a wide range of academic article databases; newspaper and periodical databases; and reference resources. These databases will provide you with the kind of evidence you need to back up your research. Go to this page at the LRC website for more detailed info about the NOVEL collection of databases: http://www.erhsnyc.org/apps/pages/index.jspuREC_ID=27969&type=d&termREC_ID=&pREC_ID=341195

NYPL Articles & Databases-
You need your library card barcode to access these databases. ElRo participates in the MyLibraryNYC (MLNYC) program, a partnership between the NYCDOE and the NY Public Library (NYPL). Please see Ms. M as soon as possible so she can give you your new MLNYC library card. If you already have a NYPL card, this will replace it. Any fines you have or books you've lost will be cleared from your record. You won't ever have to worry about late fees again (within reason). NYPL's wonderful collection provides an enormous amount of content beyond the NOVEL databases. It includes full-text, scholarly articles, many of which you can access from home (house icon), as well as authoritative websites. Its periodical & newspaper indexes are useful for researching more recent events like the Iraq War. Many of the better databases can only be accessed at the library (we have three branches within walking distance of school). JStor is one of the best of these.
Online Portals
The Internet History Sourcebook Project"- provides links to a wide array
of historical texts from all over the world. This is the "Crusades" page:
Online Portals, Directories & Archives
And, how do you know which resources are appropriate?
https://www.diigo.com/user/elrobookmarks
http://www.nypl.org/collections/articles-databases
http://www.loc.gov/library/libarch-digital.html
http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook.asp
http://www.literaryhistory.com/
http://www.csustan.edu/english/reuben/home.htm
http://www.jurn.org/
http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Lit/
http://edsitement.neh.gov/student-resources
http://www.science.gov/
http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/ETEmain.html
http://web.clas.ufl.edu/users/ufhatch/pages/03-Sci-Rev/SCI-REV-Home/
http://www-history.mcs.st-and.ac.uk/
http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/students/
http://www.dnaftb.org/
http://www.religionfacts.com/
http://www.iep.utm.edu/
http://www.theoi.com/
http://www.usa.gov/
http://www.doaj.org/
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/
http://www.ipl.org/
http://www.exploratorium.edu/climate/
http://www.ipcc.ch/
http://www.mdgmonitor.org/index.cfm
http://dailyclimate.org/
http://www.enviroliteracy.org/
http://www.loc.gov/library/libarch-digital.html
http://www.nwhp.org/
http://eudocs.lib.byu.edu/index.php/Main_Page
http://chnm.gmu.edu/
http://vlib.iue.it/history/index.html
Not all
is created
In fact, some information is just plain

Watch this video for more CRAAP
CRAAP
U
R
R
E
N
C
Y
E
L
E
V
A
N
C
E
U
T
H
O
R
I
T
Y
C
C
U
R
A
C
Y
U
R
P
O
S
E
Looking for a way to
evaluate
CRAAP

http://healthisearchproject.wikispaces.com/CRAAP+Resource+Evaluation
Here's a video that will help you understand how to scan scholarly journal articles for relevance:
It doesn't matter how you do it, but you need a method to organize your research information. This will not only help you stay sane; it will provide the basic resource info you need to create in-text citations and your works cited/references page. There are many methods for keeping it together. One of the best, tried and true techniques is using index cards. You can use this method for print or online resources. You will need a big batch of index cards which you will use in two different ways:
Source cards (one per source)- these cards provide all the bibliographic information you will need to generate a bibliography. If you take any idea from a source, the first thing you must do is create a source card. You may not end up using that particular resource for your final product, but you never know. You may also create a master list of all your resources. Just
make sure you assign a number or letter to each individual source.

Source note cards (as many as you need)- Must be identified with source code (# or letter). It contains just
ONE
idea.
This can be a direct quote (indicated by quotation marks), or a paraphrase or summary (indicate which, e.g.- "P" or "S"). Later on, you can color-code these by subject/subtopic. This process will help you make connections, which will help you organize your first draft.

See the "Helpful Graphics" section
for examples of properly formatted source and source note cards.
Online General Directories
http://vlib.org/
http://www.ipl.org/
Digital Archives
http://www.ted.com/search?cat=ss_all&q=cymatics
LOC's Country Studies
http://archive.org/
Attend A Free Lecture or Other Event That Peaks Your Interest
http://www.clubfreetime.com/new-york-city-nyc/free-talks-lectures
What Are Primary & Secondary Resources?
http://libguides.nyit.edu/content.php?pid=183440&sid=1542069
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/Weblessons/OneSource/default.htm
Keep Your Research Notes Organized
Open your own account in the social-bookmarking tool Diigo (https://www.diigo.com/sign-up), so you can keep track of all your online resources. You can organize (create lists and groups), highlight (four different colors), annotate (comment on), and share with your research collaborators.
Use
Diigo
To Collect, Organize, Highlight & Annotate Online Resources
Give all that new information a chance to percolate. Take a walk, jog, or swim. Go out to dinner and a movie with a friend. Visit a museum. Go to a poetry reading, or concert. Throw your senses a party.
You'll be surprised at the connections your mind will make when you give the outside a chance to come in.
Walk Away From The Computer
http://www.swarthmore.edu/SocSci/bschwar1/Sci.Amer.pdf
*ACADEMIC INTEGRITY*
There are many great citation management tools online. One of the best free ones is EasyBib. Once you register, you'll be able to format your citations (MLA) for all types of resources, whether they're online or print. You should add every resource you're considering to EasyBib. You may not end up using the resource later, but why take the chance? When you are logged in to your ElRo Google Apps account, you are automatically logged on to your own EasyBib account- a good reason to write up your project using GoogleDocs.
You MUST cite your sources
Plagiarism
Before you begin actually writing, you need to be aware of the importance of copyright and academic honesty. You must recognize the work of others when you produce research products for public consumption, whether they be for academic, professional or personal purposes.
Copyright law insures that intellectual creations such as books; movies or videos; paintings or photographs; and music are not reproduced without their creator's permission and/or compensation. Academic honesty is all about
honoring copyright, and other people's work
- from your fellow student
to Lady Gaga.

We recognize and honor the work of others
by not plagiarizing, and by citing our sources.
See "Resources" for more information on Academic Integrity:
A Quick Guide To Plagiarism
"What Is Copyright?"
"Copyright Term and the Public Domain in the United States"
"The Copyright Website"
http://www.copyrightwebsite.com/
http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm
"Plagiarism Prevention Zone"
http://college.cengage.com/english/plagiarism_prevention.html
There's A Method To The Madness
The Internet Archive
TED Talks
The Internet Public Library
https://www.diigo.com/learn_more/research
Click on below link, and watch the video introduction
http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/ovic/?userGroupName=nysl_me_9_erhs
This is one of the Gale Databases
PRE-WRITING
The Library of Congress (LOC) Digital Collection contains countless primary historical resources, including photographs, audio files, and documents.
Subtopics
But, where do you go?
GET AN OVERVIEW OF YOUR TOPIC
This will help you narrow down your subtopic (still too broad) to a more refined topic
you will be able to effectively research in the limited amount of time you have.
Directories are categorized by subject. Researchers use other researchers' bibliographies to find worthy resources for their own research. The authority or trustworthiness of research is best judged by where the research is published (peer-reviewed academic journal, or magazine?), and how many times others cite an author's work in their own research, Google Scholar actually provides these statistics.
They are searchable by keyword, and often browseable by subject/topic
Informational
Analytical/Expository
Argumentative
Other Questions That May Help Point You Refine
Do you have strong opinions on this topic? What are they?
Have you heard people (friends, family, talking heads) expressing strong opinions about the topic? What are they?
Have you read any newspaper or magazine articles; seen any TV programs or YouTube videos; or listened to any podcasts about the topic? Did they address a specific issue or concern?
My Pet Peeve
Focused topic generates your Research Question (RQ)
How can we substantially reduce
the use of
plastic shopping bags?
"Types of Information Sources"
http://www.lib.vt.edu/help/research/info-sources.html

A thesis is a claim about your topic. It must be debatable (include counter-claim, e.g- "while some may object . . ."), not settled fact.
It should answer one of your research questions.
It must be plausible, or able to be backed up with evidence.
It must be consequential, i.e.- it should address issues/concepts that have and/or do matter to others.
It should be clearly stated in 1 or 2 sentences at the end of your introduction.
It should be supported by at least three pieces of evidence.
It helps you focus on the topic, and your audience follow your train of thought.
You will probably revise your thesis as you proceed with your research.
While some may object to the cost and inconvenience of having to carry around reusable bags, their use must be promoted and encouraged in order to reduce the amount of non-biodegradable waste in our landfills.
Charging people for plastic shopping bags would be an effective way to discourage their use.
Check for more help on creating thesis statements, and other aspects of the research process in the "Resources" section
If you haven't
ANALYZED & ORGANIZED
your notes yet; now's the time
Create An Outline or Mindmap
http://www.the-orb.net/bibliographies/specbib.html
http://fcit.usf.edu/holocaust/resource/books.HTM
Digital Resources
It really bugs me that we still use so many
plastic bags
when we shop?
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/cshome.html
This will test your knowledge of primary & secondary sources
SOMETIMES YOUR
TOPIC
WILL BE ASSIGNED; OTHER TIMES YOU'RE GOING TO HAVE TO SELECT YOUR OWN

Keep a writing log as you examine resources. Jot down your ideas, and the resources that inspired them (make sure you include enough info to locate them again, if necessary)
Museums
Some of these ideas come from "The Craft of Research," by Wayne C. Booth
Bibliographies
A bibliography is an alphabetized list of the resources researchers used to find evidence for their claim (thesis). It contains not just the works cited in an article, or research paper, but any works consulted that informed the research process indirectly. Researchers use other researchers' bibliographies to find worthy resources for their own research. The authority/trustworthiness of research is best judged by where the research is published (peer-reviewed academic journal, or magazine?), and how many times others cite an author's work in their own research, Google Scholar actually provides these statistics.
The NYPL collection of databases contains many specialized bibliographies, a few of which can be accessed from home (house icon) or on the web (globe icon). These are not associated with a particular article or piece of research. They are topic or subject-specific lists created by experts in their field for other researchers. Most must be accessed at the library (lion icon). Academics often post specialized bibliographies online (don't use them if you can't verify the creator's credentials).
http://www.nypl.org/collections/articles-databases?subject=&location=&audience=&language=&keyword=bibliographies&limit=
NYPL Bibliographies
The Goldilocks Topic.
If it's too broad there will be too much info,
and you won't be able to focus.
If it's too narrow, you won't be able to find enough info.
Online Directories
Whether it's on your computer/tablet/device
OR
The old-fashioned way
RESEARCH PROCESS RESOURCES
Entire Research and/or Writing Process
This is the "Big 6" page from the
"Cambridge Ringe & Latin School Research Guide."
http://www.crlsresearchguide.org/00_Introduction.asp
"Tutorial for Info Power,"
from the University of Wyoming
http://tip.uwyo.edu/categories.html
General Guidance
Using Resources: A Guide for Students: Find It - Check It - Credit It
Created by a British, educational regulatory organization, but universally valid.
http://www2.ofqual.gov.uk/files/2009-12-24-plagiarism-students.pdf
Self-Evaluation Rubrics
"Checklist for Writing Assignment"
http://big6.com/media/freestuff/checklist_writing_7-121.pdf
Easybib is a citation generation tool that allows you to save and create bibliographic information using MLA format (required at ElRo). Registration is free. They also have have very good citation guides.
http://www.easybib.com/
If you're more serious about research, Zotero is the citation generation tool for you. It offers all citation formatting for free, plus great organizational features. You'll probably want to use this in college. Works best using Firefox, but you can use Zotero Standalone with other browsers.
http://www.zotero.org/
"A+ Research & Writing
for HS & College Students"
http://www.ipl.org/div/aplus/
"A Writing Process." From Vinetta Bell at the University of NC/Chapel Hill.
Denser than the others, but the most comprehensive
http://www.learnnc.org/lp/editions/writing-process/
Any one of these offers great guidance. I might start with the very well-organized "Tutorial for Info Power."
Apply the "W" and "H" questions as you start investigating your subtopic:
Who? E.g.- Who gains and who loses if we start living sustainably?
What? E.g.- What can we do we do to promote sustainable behavior?
Where? E.g.- Where are sustainable behaviors a normal part of daily life?
When? E.g.- When are people/cultures more likely to adopt sustainable behaviors?
Why? E.g.- Why are some cultures more successful at living sustainably?
How? E.g.- How do we promote sustainable behavior in a consumer-driven culture?
Your RQ will help you focus on those resources that suit your needs.
It is
NOT

your thesis, but will be the basis for it.
(i.e.- what do I want to find out about this topic)
TIP: Group your source-notes by topic/subject.
Look for common themes & relationships across topics.
Think:
connections and coincidences
.
These are the seeds that will germinate ideas for your thesis.
This generally means that their research is respected, and therefore considered to be authoritative. Remember though, older research may be cited more often simply by virtue of its age. Newer research hasn't always had enough time to circulate among peers, and be evaluated. If you find articles with a compellng POV or argument that either supports or disputes your thesis, don't be afraid to cite it,
but be prepared to defend your use of it.
Thesis Creation
http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/thesis_statement.shtml
After some reading, writing and organizing, you should be able to propose an answer to one of your research questions. So . . .
Weed out any content
not
relevent to your thesis,
and include more evidence where needed.
Yeah, I know- they're so pretty.
But, they're weeds. Be ruthless.
Plug the holes in your boat,
if you want to stay afloat
(Do you need more to support your thesis?).
4. WRITING YOUR FIRST DRAFT
Whether you're presenting a traditional paper, or a multimedia product,
you need to
convey your ideas clearly.

Before you begin your
first draft
consider:

The nature of your assignment
Your audience (teacher, students, both)
Your purpose/thesis
Does your thesis need to be revised or reconsidered in light of new information?
If so, now's the time for a final course adjustment.

These guideposts will
clarify your thought process,

and allow you to
focus on the content that speaks directly to your thesis.
The process of gathering and evaluating your resources will be far less daunting with your RQ to guide you.
Mind Mapping/Brainstorming
SpiderScribe
http://www.spiderscribe.net/
bubble.us
https://bubbl.us/
WiseMapping
http://app.wisemapping.com/c/maps/3/try
How To Make A Mind Map: The Basics
This process will lay out the road before you,
and actually help you refine your sources even more.
The Myth of Introductions

From
A+ Research & Writing
You don't need to write your introduction first
Most find it helpful to write their introduction first. If written well, it summarizes the purpose, expectations and context of your investigation. But, if you've created a good outline or mind map, you may choose to create your introduction at the end, when you've arrived at your destination, and can reflect upon the path you took to get there. Either way, It should include one or two research questions, and your thesis statement.
Ms. M Can Help
Francis Bacon
Some of the content for this section was found at this very useful page from the University of Southern California's (USC) great LibGuide, "Organizing Your Social Sciences Research Paper"- http://libguides.usc.edu/content.php?pid=83009&sid=618406
HELPFUL GRAPHICS
5. REVISE, EDIT, PROOFREAD
Revision
is about the BIG PICTURE:
Have you accomplished your overall goal (answered your research question/s, and supported your conclusion with enough evidence?
Would you convey your argument more clearly if you rearranged paragraphs or sections, or deleted them entirely?

Editing
is about style and coherence.
Do your sentences lead the reader along in a logical sequence?
Do you need to make them grammatically clearer?
Can you make your sentences shorter?

Proofreading
is checking for grammatical, punctuation and spelling errors. It's the last thing you do. Make sure to check your in-text citations (have you given proper credit when needed? Are they properly formatted?)
But, before you do . . .
Academic Integrity
Citations
https://www.diigo.com/learn_more/research
Click on below link, and watch the video introduction
to the social bookmarking tool Diigo
Organization
Introducción españoles a Diigo
Evernote
http://evernote.com/work/land/version-2/?gclid=CMbyho3X87oCFQpnOgodICsAaQ
Such questions will help you generate a list of keywords/phrases:
sustainability
carrying capacity
carbon footprint
the commons
recycling
plastic
shopping bags
Online Portal , Directory & Archive Examples By Subject
The keywords/phrases you have been collecting will help you zero in on those resources that pertain to your topic.
Check the Table of Contents (TOC) and indexes of printed resources.
Use your keywords (don't forget to use synonyms) to search for online database articles.
Read the abstracts (summaries of database articles) to gauge their relevance.
Evernote
is one of the most powerful of the free notetaking apps available. You can use it to keep track of both print and online resources, including the full-text articles (copy and paste ) from databases. You can save scanned content, documents, photos, and audio recordings. Their foldering system will keep you organized. It's perfect for creating source and note cards. For more in-depth info, go to the "Resources" section, where you'll find excellent tutorials. You can also look for tutorials in the "9th Grade Research Project" list in ElRoBookmarks.
DON'T WAIT TO WRITE.
Writing crystallizes your thoughts.
"Write down the thoughts of the moment. Those that come unsought for
are commonly the most valuable."
Are there authors and/or researchers who have regularly been cited by others ?

Resource Types
These keywords will help you search effectively for pertinent resources.
Remember, content providers may use different terminology or subject terminology,
so don't forget to think about synonyms. Make a list of your keywords/phrases.
STILL TOO BROAD THOUGH . . .
And, STAY ORGANIZED
Revision, Editing & Proofreading
http://sites.middlebury.edu/peer_writing_tutors/2011/02/14/revision-editing-and-proofreading-what%E2%80%99s-the-difference/
Resource Evaluation
From "Identifying and Narrowing A Topic," Creighton University
Info Cycle
What Are Databases?
http://www.eduteka.org/profeinvitad.php3?ProfInvID=0009
Some of these ideas come from the
"Cambridge Rindge and Latin School's ""Research Guide."
Research & Writing Handouts,
University of TX at Austin
http://uwc.utexas.edu/handouts/
Plagiarism
http://www.plagiarism.org/plagiarism-101/overview/
Some of these ideas were taken from "How To Write A Thesis Statement,"
Writing Tutorial Services, Indiana University
Handouts from "The Writing Center," University of NC-Chapel Hill
http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/
Thesis Statement Creator
http://johnmcgarvey.com/apworld/student/thesiscreator.html
University Libraries, University of WA
Penn State University Libraries
http://www.libraries.psu.edu/content/dam/psul/up/lls/audiovideo/infocycle_2008.swf
Primary, Secondary & Tertiary Resources
http://www.ala.org/rusa/sections/history/resources/pubs/usingprimarysources
Copyright
http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/docs/copyrightterm.pdf
CRAAP Resource Evaluation Criteria
http://www.csuchico.edu/lins/handouts/eval_websites.pdf
Evaluacion critica de un Sitio Web
C.A.R.S Checklist for Evaluating Internet Sources
From the NY Institute of Technology
http://libguides.nyit.edu/content.php?pid=183440&sid=1542069
Meriam Library, California State University, Chico
See the "Resources" page for other sites that address plagiarism.
Many of these ideas come from "√Revision, Editing and Proofreading: What’s the Difference? (Middlebury College) and "The Writing Process: Revising, Editing and Proofreading" (University of Toronto). See the bibliography.
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/plagiarize
"Plagiarism: How To Avoid It"
Perdue's Online Writing Lab (OWL)
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/
http://www.copyrightwebsite.com/Default.aspx
Evernote Tutorial
Diigo
The Writing Process: Revising, Editing and Proofreading
http://www.engineering.utoronto.ca/Directory/students/ecp/handbook/process/editing.htm
Revision, Editing and Proofreading: What’s the Difference?
http://www.nwp.org/cs/public/download/nwp_file/342/Four_principles.pdf?x-r=pcfile_d
A Baker's Dozen of Fat-Cutting Exercises
http://www.nwp.org/cs/public/print/resource/756
http://flavorwire.com/361311/20-great-writers-on-the-art-of-revision/
20 Great Writers On The Art of Revision
Topic Selection
"Narrowing Research" Libguide, University of RI
http://libraryschool.libguidescms.com/content.php?pid=224553&sid=1922368
Information Elimination:
A Lesson on Narrowing the Topic For Expository Writing
http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/WebLessons/InformationElimination/InfoElim.htm#6a
An Important Word About Manual Entry of Citation Information
Unless you're generating a citation directly from a database, or other content provider that offers this service, you will almost always have to manually edit your citation to include other necessary information. Here is an example of an EasyBib citation form for an online resource I used for this presentation:
The missing information is in red. You will have to locate this information if it is available. You may leave it blank, if it's not provided.
See if you can find some of the missing information from the website:
http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/thesis_statement.shtml
Databases
http://www.mywebcheck.net/start.php
Recommended by Ms. M. "Senior" level is for high school
http://www.andyspinks.com/researchhelp/web/CARS.pdf
how can we substantially reduce the use of plastic shopping bags?
My answer/opinion, or THESIS is:
3. CREATING YOUR THESIS
"Revision (n.)-1610s, "act of revising," from French révision, from Late Latin revisionem (nominative revisio)
"a seeing again. . . "
(
Online Etymology Dictionary
)
"Your eloquence should be the servant of the ideas in your head. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out"
(Kurt Vonnegut, "How to Use the Power of the Printed Word."
From "20 Great Writers on The Art of Revison." See "Resources" section).
This well-organized, concise guide from NY Military Academy illustrates general formatting for research papers, including source and note cards
http://www.nyma.org/uploaded/Academics/Booth_Library/formatguide2009.pdf
Source/Bibliographic and Note Cards
"Instructions for Source Cards/Works Cited Entries" (Miami Valley Career Technology Center
"Guidelines for Notetaking" (Miami Valley Career Technology Center
http://www.mvctc.com/researchpaper/SourceCards.html
http://www.mvctc.com/researchpaper/NoteCard.html
Research Process
Dewey Decimal System
Resource Evaluation
CRAAP
C.A.R.S
AASL's 21st Century Learner
Information Literacy
Topic Selection
Locating Resources
Venn Diagrams
Mindmaps/Brainstorming
Topic Triangles
Create a Mindmap
http://galesupport.com/novelGeo/novelGeoLink.php?token=3XGFPNRIUMS39M1K&db=PQ
http://galesupport.com/novelGeo/novelGeoLink.php?loc=nysl_me_9_erhs&db=GPS
http://galesupport.com/novelGeo/novelGeoLink.php?uname=nygeo4905&db=SCH1
NYPL Articles & Databases
The house icon indicates those databases you can access from home. The lion icon indicates those that you can only access at the main library. You can narrow search results to only those you can access from home- though you will also limit your results. You will need to login with your library card barcode and password.
There are countless other databases, archives, directories, portals and indexes available online. Here's a collection that Ms. M has vetted for you from ElRoBookmarks in Diigo:
http://www.nypl.org/collections/articles-databases
https://www.diigo.com/list/elrobookmarks/%22Research+Journey%22+Databases%2C+Portals%2C+Directories+%26+Indexes/2zfbbkdld
Want to know how to get a library card and access their databases?
http://www.nypl.org/help
C.A.R.S Source Evaluation Worksheet
http://www.teachlearn-online.net/olcteach/ElearningTutorial/cars.html
Research Paper Self-Evaluation
file://localhost/Users/huskies/Desktop/Research%20Paper%20Self%20Evaluation.htm
BIBLIOGRAPHY
ANALYZE & ORGANIZE
"What Are Databases, And Why Do We Need Them?"
Need More Help Figuring Out How To Use Online Databases?
"Database Search Tips," MIT Libraries
http://libguides.mit.edu/content.php?pid=36863&sid=271370
If you need help understanding what a suitable thesis statement looks like, check these resources:
"Revising & Fixing Weak Thesis Statements," Adapted from, Rosenwasser, D. and Jill, S.,  "Writing Analytically," 2012
http://www.lakeforest.edu/live/files/1757-revisedrevisingandfixingweakthesispdf

"Thesis Statements," Writing Center, University of NC at Chapel Hill
http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/thesis-statements/
"Examples of Thesis Statement Revision," Hommocks Middle School
http://hommocks.mamkschools.org/www/ud00/a/aee16938445f4aa8898ac8c052e782ee/Personal_Documents/Thesis%20developing.pdf
"Turn Your Topic into a Research Question," Clark College
http://www.clark.edu/Library/iris/start/topics/topics_p7.shtml
http://www.clark.edu/Library/iris/start/topics/topics_p7.shtml
Miller, K., & Childs, T. (2007). Concept Mapping: How to Start Your Term Paper Research‏. YouTube.
"20 Great Writers on the Art of Revision – Flavorwire "Web. 1/22/2014 <http://flavorwire.com/361311/20-great-writers-on-the-art-of-revision/>.

"A+ Research & Writing "Web. 1/22/2014 <http://www.ipl.org/div/aplus/>.

"Basic Steps to Creating a Research Project- CRLS Research Guide "Web. 2/3/2014 <http://www.crlsresearchguide.org/>.

"Diigo - Improving how we find, share, and save information - YouTube "Web. 1/22/2014 <

"Diigo en 10 minutos - YouTube "Web. 1/22/2014 <

"Evaluating Information using the CRAAP Test - YouTube "Web. 2/3/2014 <

"Famous Quotes at BrainyQuote "Web. 1/22/2014 <http://www.brainyquote.com/>.

"Google Images "Web. 1/22/2014 <http://www.google.com/imghp>.

"How to Make a Mind Map - The Basics - YouTube."Web. 2/3/2014 <

"How To Write A Thesis Statement."Web. 1/22/2014 <http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/thesis_statement.shtml>.

"Introduction to the CRLS Research Guide- CRLS Research Guide "Web. 1/22/2014 <http://www.crlsresearchguide.org/00_Introduction.asp>.

"Learn How to Use Evernote | Evernote "Web. 2/3/2014 <http://evernote.com/video/>.

Molton, R. "What Is Copyright? - YouTube "Web. 2/3/2014 <

"Plagiarism: How to avoid it - YouTube "Web. 2/3/2014 <

"Primary vs. Secondary Sources - YouTube "Web. 2/3/2014 <

"Purpose of Guide - Organizing Your Social Sciences Research Paper - LibGuides at University of Southern California "Web. 2/3/2014 <http://libguides.usc.edu/writingguide>.

"A Quick Guide To Plagiarism - YouTube "Web. 2/3/2014 <

"Quick Tips & Shortcuts for Database Searching - YouTube."Web. 2/3/2014 <

"Research Topic Tips - Ethics Projects - LibGuides Sandbox for Library Schools at Springshare "Web. 2/3/2014 <http://libraryschool.libguidescms.com/content.php?pid=224553&sid=1922368>.

"Revision, Editing and Proofreading: What’s the Difference? : Peer Writing Tutors & FYS Mentors at Middlebury "Web. 1/22/2014 <http://sites.middlebury.edu/peer_writing_tutors/2011/02/14/revision-editing-and-proofreading-what’s-the-difference/>.

"Search library databases like a pro! - YouTube "Web. 2/3/2014 <

"What Are Databases and Why You Need Them - YouTube "Web. 1/22/2014 <
https://library.nycenet.edu/cataloging/servlet/presentadvancedsearchredirectorform.do?l2m=Library%20Search&tm=TopLevelCatalog
http://www.erhsnyc.org/apps/pages/index.jsp?uREC_ID=27969&type=d&termREC_ID=&pREC_ID=452912
Ms. M's Tutorials Page
OWL: Tips & Examples for Writing Thesis Statements
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/545/01/
You can use CRAAP to evaluate any resource.
Just ignore or adapt the criteria that only apply to online resources
when using it to evaluate print resources.
Pre-writing is all about brainstorming.
Clustering
Mindmapping
What ideas has your reading generated?What about all those connections and relationships you've discovered during your research? Check out those index cards or Evernotes, because now it's time to-
These 3 tutorials cover all the important searching strategies
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLejNKcSoYbcC_esrWkFlYzNfHjzqpk3rJ
How To Read a Scholarly Journal Article
6. CREATE YOUR REFERENCE LIST
We said it earlier, and we'll say it again:
We recognize and honor the work of others
by not plagiarizing, and by citing our sources.

We do this both in the paper/project itself (parenthetical or in-text citations),
and by creating a "Works Cited" list (aka "References") page once the project is complete.
A "Works Cited" page is
not
the same as a bibliography (see link below to understand the differences).
It is a list of
only those sources you actually cited in your paper, and must be properly formatted (MLA).

Fortunately, there are several great citation managers that will make this process a breeze. We recommend-
http://www.easybib.com/
The EasyBib Google app is already associated with your Elro Google account,
which is why you should use it to write your paper.
Here is a short video (ignore school-specific instructions) on how the process works:
Ignore school-specific instructions.
Your teachers will tell you what they expect.
Also, you don't need to load the app;
it's already been done for you.
Not sure how to create parenthentical citations? Watch this video:
Click the below link for a good explanation of the difference between a "Works Cited" page, and a Bibliography:

http://libanswers.dominican.edu/faq/8000
The U.S. Government has many portals,
like The Department of Energy's great site:
http://www.energy.gov/
Digital Archives
Digital archives are collections of historical documents that have been digitized by the institution that houses them. They usually contain primary resources like photos, documents, and artifacts. They are fantastic resources for research. The Library of Congress has one of the best. There are countless others, many of which I have added to the ElRoBookmarks Diigo collection.
Focused Topic: Plastic Bags
If you need help during this stage, ask your teacher or the librarian
TIME TO WRITE UP YOUR FINAL DRAFT.
IF YOU NEED HELP PROPERLY FORMATTING YOUR PAPER GO TO THIS WEBSITE:

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/
Full transcript