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Late Adulthood: psychosocial Development

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Faith Hardy

on 3 December 2015

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Transcript of Late Adulthood: psychosocial Development

Maria Estrada
Faith Hardy :)
Late Adulthood: Psychosocial Development
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There are two types of theories
Self theories:
individuals’ perception of self
Ability to meet challenges
Stratification theories
Describe the ways societies place people on a life path
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“The way people negotiate challenges to the self”
Crucial when older adults face major challenges
Such as:
Illness
Retirement
Death of loved ones
Define:
Theories of late adulthood that emphasize the core self, or the search to maintain one’s integrity and identity.
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Used to mean honesty also meaning:
a feeling of being whole
Not scattered
Comfortable with self and where they are in life
This is when an old adult feels pride with what they have done in the past
Integrity versus despair
The final stage of Erik Erikson’s developmental sequence, in which older adults seek to integrate their unique experiences which their vision of community.
Holding On to One's Self
as our bodies and social relationships change, adults may need to revise their self-theory about their own identity
Self Theories
Define:
Define:
compulsive hoarding
The urge to accumulate and hold on to familiar objects and possessions, sometimes to the point of their becoming health and/or safety hazards. (This impulse tends to increase with age.)
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The Positivity Effect
Define:
The tendency for elderly people to perceive, prefer, and remember positive images and experiences more than negative ones.
some people tend t be able to cope successfully with the changes of late adulthood through
selective optimization with compensation
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Stratification Theories
Define:
Theories that emphasize the social forces, particularly those related to a person’s social stratum or social category , limit individual choices and affect a persons ability to function in late adulthood because past satisfaction continues to limit life in various ways.
The view that aging makes a person’s social sphere increasingly narrow, resulting in role relinquishment, withdrawal, and passivity.
Disengagement theory
Define:
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retirement
Volunteer Work
Define:
Aging in place
Remaining in the same home and community in later life, adjusting but not leaving when health fades.
Define:
Naturally Occurring Retirement Community (NORC)
A neighborhood or apartment complex whose population is mostly retired people who moved to the location as younger adults and never left.
Define:
The obligation of adult children to care for the aging parents.
Filial Responsibility
Define:
Activity Theory
The view that elderly people want and need to remain active in a variety of social spheres with relatives, friends, and community groups and become withdrawn only unwillingly, as a result of ageism.
harms all people involved because it "creates socialization deficits for members of all age groups"
lack of needed social experiences: Younger as well as older people have a narrow perspective on life if they interact only with poeple
Home sweet Home
For elderly people no matter what their particular faith or ethnicity, psychological health depends on feeling what they are part of traditions that were handed down by their ancestors and will be carried on by their descendants.
Religious Involvement
Many older people are passionate about the well-being of future generations who are not their direct descendants.
Political Activism:
Personal happiness increases with the length as well as the quality of an intimate relationship.
Long Term Partnerships:
(tensions between older and younger adults):
-Assistance arises from need and from the ability to provide.
-Frequency of contact is related to geographical proximity, not affection.
-Love is influenced by the interaction remembered from childhood.
-Sons feel stronger obligation; daughters feel stronger affection.
Relationship
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generations
1)Remote grandparents: are emotionally distant from their grandchildren. THEY ARE ALSO ESTEEMED ELDERS WHO ARE HONORED, RESPECTED, AND OBEYED, EXPECTING TO GET HELP WHENEVER THEY NEED IT.
2)Compassionate grandparents: entertain and “spoil” their grandchildren. Especially in ways, or for reasons, that the parents would not.
3)Involved Grandparents: are active in the day-to-day lives of their grandchildren. They live near them and see them daily.
4)Surrogate Grandparents: raise their grandchildren, usually because the parents are unable or unwilling to do so.
Grandchildren:
Friends are needed and wanted in late adulthood, particularly by elderly people who do not have a living spouse or children. Recent widowhood or divorce is almost always difficult, but elderly people who never married usually have friendships, activities, ans social connections that keep them busy and happy.
Friendship:
society guides and pressures males and females into divergent
"blue is for boys"
-hard worker
go out and get money for the family
"pink is for girls"-house wife
have children
Thank You
this affects education, health, place of residence, and employment
Many people once believed that older adults were healthier and happier when they were employed. Retirement is more enjoyable when you are married than living alone.
Volunteer work makes elderly people feel like a part of their community.
They usually tend to do community work with friends or neighbors which makes them feel more connected

Typically identified as five tasks of self car that are important to independent living: eating, bathing, toileting, dressing, and transferring from a bed to a chair.
The inability to perform any of this tasks is a sign of frailty
Define:
Activities of daily life
Actions (for example, paying bills and driving a car) that are important to independent living and that require some intellectual competence and forethought.
The ability to perform this tasks may be even more critical to self sufficiency than ADL ability.
Instrumental activities of daily life:
Define:
A living arrangement for elderly people that combines privacy and independence with medical supervision.
Assisted living
Define:
Elderly people prefer to grow old in their homes.
They do not like to move to other residences.
If they must move, they prefer to stay near their old neighborhood, perhaps in a smaller apartment in a building with an elevator , but not in a different city or state.
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