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Puritans and the Salem Witch Trials

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on 26 November 2013

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Transcript of Puritans and the Salem Witch Trials

Puritans and the Salem Witch Trials
Puritans formed when they were under siege from the church of England and the king for their choice of religion.
Puritans came to America for religious freedom of choice.
Doctrinally, Puritans adhered to the Five Points of Calvinism : (1) unconditional election (the idea that God had decreed who was damned and who was saved from before the beginning of the world); (2) limited atonement (the idea that Christ died for the elect only); (3) total depravity (humanity's utter corruption since the Fall); (4) irresistible grace (regeneration as entirely a work of God, which cannot be resisted and to which the sinner contributes nothing); and (5) the perseverance of the saints (the elect, despite their backsliding and faintness of heart, cannot fall away from grace).
Puritan Roots
Puritan Beliefs
If Puritans did not read the Bible, it was thought that they were worshiping the devil.
Puritans would sit in their appropriate places. The men sat on one side, the women sat on the other, and the boys did not sit with their parents, but sat together in a designated pew where they were expected to sit in complete silence. The deacons sat in the front row just below the pulpit because everyone agreed the first pew was the one of highest dignity. The servants and slaves crowded near the door and rushed to a loft or balcony. The picture to the right shows how strict order was kept in the church and they would use a staff to poke anyone misbehaving.
Puritans did not like music in their services.
Powers of Satan
Puritans believed that God used the Devil to show Christians the wrong way of life, to test the faith of Christians, and to act out vengeance upon deserving individuals.
Puritans believed that women were particularly weak to the influences of the Devil, and thus, were tempted much more easily. This owes partly to the biblical story of Adam and Eve, in which the serpent tempted Eve away from God, convincing her to eat the Forbidden Fruit. Puritans feared that some women were completely lost to God and had turned to witchcraft to serve the Devil.
Puritans respected the Devil and feared his powers even as they despised him because the acts of the Devil were another form of God's will.
Signs of Witchcraft
Five tests that were used to determine if someone was a witch or not.
1. Bound Submersion
2.Pressing
3. Forced Confession by Dunking
4. Lord’s Prayer Test
5. Eye Witnesses Testimonials
Reality of Salem
Jealousy and hostility between the Puritan people played a major role in the Salem witch trials.
Reverend Parris and his impassioned sermons also helped fuel the witch trials hysteria.
Salem Village tried to gain independence from Salem Town.
Puritan Names
1.Dancell-Dallphebo-Mark-Anthony-Gallery-Cesar. Son of Dancell-Dallphebo-Mark-Anthony-Gallery-Cesar, born 1676.
2.Praise-God. Full name, Praise-God Barebone.
3.If-Christ-had-not-died-for-thee-thou-hadst-been-damned. For some inexplicable reason, he decided to go by the name Nicolas Barbon.
4.Fear-God. Also a Barebone.
5.Job-raked-out-of-the-ashes
6.Has-descendents
7.Wrestling
8.Fight-the-good-fight-of-faith
9.Fly-fornication
10.Jesus-Christ-came-into-the-world- to-save.
11.Thanks
12.What-God-will
13.Joy-in-sorrow. A name attached to many stories of difficult births.
14.Remember
15.Fear-not. His/her surname was “Helly”, born 1589.
16.Experience
17.Anger
18.Abuse-not
19.Die-Well. A brother of Farewell Sykes, who died in 1865. We can assume they had rather pessimistic parents.
20.Continent. Continent Walker was born in 1594 in Sussex.

Here are some of the extreme names Puritans were given.
By participating in this WebQuest, I have learned more about Puritan Roots, Beliefs, Names, the powers of Satan, the real reason for the Salem witch trials, and some Signs of Witch Craft. I have also learned more about Puritan Life, their history, their beliefs, and the Salem Witch trials during this WebQuest.
Citations
http://www.history.com/topics/puritanism
The Information and pictures used for the completion of this webquest were taken from the following websites linked below.
http://fervis.tripod.com/
http://people.opposingviews.com/devil-satan-puritan-beliefs-2619.html
http://listverse.com/2012/07/27/10-tests-for-guilt-used-at-the-salem-witch-trials/
http://school.discoveryeducation.com/schooladventures/salemwitchtrials/life/divisions.html
http://treeofmamre.wordpress.com/2013/09/16/extreme-puritan-given-names/
This prezi was created from a WebQuest made by Tony and Thanael.
Here are the list of questions that needed to be completed in the WebQuest.
Slide 3. 1. What caused the Puritans to form?

2. Why did Puritans come to America?
Slide 4. 1. When someone was not reading the bible, what did their fellow Puritans think they were doing?

2. Was their a certain place where people had to sit in their meeting house, if so where did they have to sit?
Slide 5. 1. Why was the Devil such an important part of Puritan life?

2. Why are women believed to be weak to the Devil?
Slide 6. 1. What are 5 tests that were used to determine if someone was witch or not?
Slide 12. 1. Why do you think the Salem Witch trials really happened?

2. What, do you think, fueled the Witch trials?
Slide 13. What are some Puritan names?
Bound Submersion
Bound Submersion was a test to prove if someone was a witch. The suspect would be bound at the hands and feet with a heavy rock attached to themselves and thrown into a body of water. If the body floated to the surface, that was proof, that the accused was indeed a witch (at which point they’d execute her by some other means). If she sank to the bottom and inevitably drowned, she was innocent. About 100% of the people put through this test drowned.
Pressing
Another means of torture designed to make the accuser talk, but made it impossible for them to talk, much less breathe. Called “pressing,” the subject is placed beneath heavy stones, meant to literally crush you into submission. One such recipient endured this very treatment, an 80 year-old man named Giles Corey accused of being a warlock (yes men could be accused as well). He refused to give a plea each of the several times he was asked, and was ultimately crushed to death by the stones, which, as it turned out, were more likely to speak than he was.
Those who didn’t admit to being a witch and under heavy suspicion were usually induced to confess by way of torture. One method was dunking, in which the accused would be held under water repeatedly until they were successfully broken down. This is also an effective means to brainwash someone into believing a lie, anything to make the inhumanity cease.
Forced Confession by Dunking
The Lord's Prayer Test
The Lord's Prayer Test was a literal test of faith. The accused would be made to recite the “Lord’s Prayer” without error – this included any stumbling, stammering, or outright wrong quotes. As elocution is a painstaking art, it seems that any average human would slip up, but under “God’s eyes” (as well as whoever else sees themselves fit to judge) mistakes are unacceptable. As far as fits go, try forcing someone who may be mentally-retarded or hysterical (medically-speaking) or hallucinating from LSD-fungus-covered rye bread (another suspect of these ubiquitous “fits”) to read from the bible with absolute level-headedness.
Some witnesses would confess to actually seeing the alleged witches practicing their black magic, which was enough to tattoo guilt all over them. Of course there was nothing to stop accusers of making up stories just to see people they disliked or deemed strange taken away. Many accusations stemmed from the belief that a death or illness had been caused by witchcraft, which upon filing with a magistrate and being deemed credible would lead to an arrest. On the charge of “affliction with witchcraft” or “entering a covenant with the devil.”
Eye Witness Testimonials
Full transcript