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Literary Elements - Ngoc, Giselle, Carmen

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Ngoc Nguyen

on 8 January 2016

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Transcript of Literary Elements - Ngoc, Giselle, Carmen

Genre
Word Use
Concepts

To exaggerate the use of irony, amusement, or to criticize and ridicule the person’s ignorance
Ex. Comics section of a newspaper has a picture of a park with a sign that reads "Caution: Children Playing". All the kids in the picture are on tablets and none of the kids are actually playing in the playground.
Onomatopoeia
A sound that sounds like what it describes
Ex. Crash, Pow, Crunch

Haiku is a Japanese form of poetry that consists of three lines. The first and last lines have five syllables and the middle line has seven. The lines do not rhyme
Ex. "Over the wintry forest rage, winds howl in rage with no leaves to to blow." -Natsume Soseki.



Rhyme Scheme
The pattern in order of rhymes at the end of the lines of a verse or poem
Ex. "Twinkle, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are. Up above the sky so high, Like a diamond in the sky. Twinkle, twinkle, little star, How I wonder where you are." - Jane Taylor
Assonance
A repeating vowel sound
Ex. “purple curtain, Thrilled me-filled me” - Edgar Allan Poe, “The Raven”

Literary Elements

A poem with fourteen lines using an optional amount of a number of formal rhyme schemes.
Ex. "Turn back the heart you've turned away
Give back your kissing breath
Leave not my love as you have left
The broken hearts of yesterday
But wait, be still, don't lose this way
Affection now, for what you guess
May be something more, could be less
Accept my love, live for today
Your roses wilted, as love spurned
Yet trust in me, my love and truth
Dwell in my heart, from which you've turned
My strength as great as yours aloof.
It is in fear you turn away
And miss the chance of love today!" -James Deford


A form of humorous poetry which consists of five verses
Ex. There once was a girl Selina, who wanted to be a ballerina. She went on her toes, and broke her nose.
Then became cleaner." - Selina Wallis
Consonance
The repetition of the same consonants
Ex."He clasps the crag with crooked hands."-Lord Alfred Tennyson

Sensory Language
Words that show a descriptive image
Ex. “They were flat round wafers, slightly browned on the edges and butter-yellow in the center” - Maya Angelou, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings”


A literal, vivid or figurative language
Ex. "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud"-William Wordsworth

Metaphor
A comparison that does not use “like” or “as
Ex. “The snow is a white blanket.” - YourDictionary.com

Internal Rhyme
A rhyme that involves a word in the middle of a sentence and another at the end
Ex. “dreary and weary” Edgar Allan Poe, “The Raven”
Theme
The central idea or lesson about life the story conveys
Ex. The theme for Tamerlane is love.
Tone


The author's attitude about what they write
Ex. The tone from The Raven is melancholy
Mood

The feeling that the reader gets from a story
Ex. "Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary" or "And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain" -Edgar Allan Poe
Characterization
A method the author uses such as the character's actions, words, or thoughts to reveal a character's personality
Ex. The characterization for The Tell-Tale Heart is crazy.
Idiom
A phrase who's meaning is exaggerated.
Ex. "I'm so hungry I could eat a horse."
Flashback
A scene in either a movie or novel that is rpresenting a scene earlier in the plot.
Ex. In the new movie, The Force Awakens, Rey remembers when she was taken away from her family as a child.
Bias
A tendency in favor of a person or subject.
Ex. A boy might be biased against something pink because he believes pink is a girl color, but really it is not. Pink can be for everyone.
Paradox
A statement that contradicts itself or a situation which seems to defy logic.
Ex. Less is more.
Stereotype
A character that is too common or original.
Ex. All girls like dolls.
Extended Metaphor
It compares two unlike things, which continue all the way through multiple sentences in lines of a poem or a paragraph.
Ex. "But soft! What light through yonder window breaks? It is the East, and Juliet is the sun! Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief." -Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare is comparing "Juliet" with the "sun".
Dialect
A significant type of language.
Ex. "We's safe, Huch, we's safe! Jump up and crack yo' heels. Dat's de good ole Cairo at las', I jis knows it." -Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn
Myth
A false story that takes you back into time, depicting many types of different fantasies and truths.
Ex. Pandora's Box
Fable
A short story usually with animals for characters with a moral.
Ex. The Lion and the Mouse
Legend
Traditional stories that are usually known as historical but not authentic.
Ex. Johnny Appleseed
Tall Tale
A story that is not believable but very exaggerated.
Ex. Jack and the Corn Stalk
Alliteration
A device in poetry that repeats similar sounds.
Ex. "nodded, nearly napping" -by Edgar Allan Poe, "The Raven"
Iambic Pentameter
A line that consists of one stressed syllable followed by an unstressed syllable five times.
Ex. "Her vestal livery is but sick and green. And none but fools do wear it; cast it off. -Shakespeare, "Romeo and Juliet"
Couplet
Two lines that rhyme
Ex. "Tis education forms the common mind, Just as the twig is bent, the tree's inclined." -Alexander Pope
Meter
The rhythm of a part of poetry.
Ex.Shall I | com pare | thee to | a sum | mer's day? -Sonnet 18
Simile
A comparison of things using "like" and "as".
Ex. "the sweet smell of success" - EnchantingLearning.com
Repetition
Repeating something that has been said or written.
Ex. "Oh woeful, oh woeful, woeful, woeful day!" -Shakespeare, "Romeo and Juliet"
Prose
Free wording.
Ex. A newspaper article, a fictional novel, a magazine interview, and biography.
Personification
When something nonhuman represents or acts like human characteristics.
Ex. "Winter's icy grip caused people to shudder." -Yourdictionary.com
Sonnet
Limerick
Haiku
Satire
Oxymoron
A figure of speech that has contradictory terms that appear in conjuction.
Ex. pretty ugly
Imagery
Suspense
Foreshadowing
Irony
Allusion
A feeling of uncertainty and anxiousness about what would happen next.
Ex. Star Wars movies have a lot of suspense. That is why people want to see the new ones that come out.
To warn or indicate.
Ex. In the fairy tale, Little Riding Hood, the mother is concerned for her safety and the foreshadows the appearance of the big bad wolf.
A phrase which meaning isnot predictable from the usual meanings of its components.
Ex. When you tell someone to "break a leg", you really mean for them to have good luck.
A short reference to a person, place, thing, or idea of historical, literary, cultural, or political significance.
Ex. "I was surprised his nose was not growing like Pinocchio's."
Hyperbole
An exaggerated statement that is not taken liteally.
Ex. "She cried so long that she made a lake."
We hope
you enjoyed!

Created by:
Ngoc,
Carmen,
Giselle
Full transcript